man111111
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which engineering degree should i choose
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donut_mckenzie28
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(Original post by man111111)
which engineering degree should i choose
Depends .But i really want to work or have a career in the aeronautical or aviation industry or aerospace engineering.
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man111111
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Do you know anyone who took an electrical and electronic engineering degree? In addition, do you think an electrical and electronic engineering degree may be better than an aerospace engineering degree?
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donut_mckenzie28
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Follow your heart's desire!!
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man111111
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A few people told me that an electrical and electronic engineering degree would be better suited for me because it has better job opportunities and I could potentially work with planes.
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man111111
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[=donut_mckenzie28;74532222]Follow your heart's desire!![/QUOTE]

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Smack
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(Original post by man111111)
which engineering degree should i choose
What kinds of things interest you?
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trapking
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If I were you I would do EEE.

Timing is perfect for future and you can go into avionics anyway.
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man111111
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(Original post by Smack)
What kinds of things interest you?
I like space, planes, looking inside electrical products, phones, computers, smart watches and building lego technic sets. In addition, I would like to compete in robot wars. Basically, I want to improve, make and fix things.
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man111111
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(Original post by trapking)
If I were you I would do EEE.

Timing is perfect for future and you can go into avionics anyway.
Do aerospace engineering degrees teach students the electronic systems on aircraft?
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by man111111)
which engineering degree should i choose
Depends what you prefer. Also, bear in mind that some courses have you do one or even two years of general engineering before choosing a specialism. Apparently quite a lot of people change their minds...
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trapking
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(Original post by man111111)
Do aerospace engineering degrees teach students the electronic systems on aircraft?
Depends on the university and its optional modules but generally you will do very little of it anyway. You don't learn everything in the degree you essentially learn the basics of engineering science with a few options of interest (for example I did Mechanical and in my last year I did Electrical Drive Systems with the EEE students as I chose that as my option).

Although from your description to Smack it sounds like EEE would be the better fit for you.
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man111111
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(Original post by trapking)
Depends on the university and its optional modules but generally you will do very little of it anyway. You don't learn everything in the degree you essentially learn the basics of engineering science with a few options of interest (for example I did Mechanical and in my last year I did Electrical Drive Systems with the EEE students as I chose that as my option).

Although from your description to Smack it sounds like EEE would be the better fit for you.
Did you find your mechanical engineering degree hard? Some people say that mechanical engineers are like aerospace engineers. Is this true?
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trapking
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(Original post by man111111)
Did you find your mechanical engineering degree hard?
Of course it was hard!

-First year: Challenging but the difficulty wasn't too high.
-Second year: Things got a lot harder + a lot more group project work was done.
-Third year: I just wanted to jump off a bridge but some aspects were very enjoyable it was more applied to real world :laugh:


(Original post by man111111)
Some people say that mechanical engineers are like aerospace engineers. Is this true?
I don't know what you exactly mean by this but an Aerospace Engineer will study a bit more fluid dynamics than a Mechanical Engineer and possibly have a few different modules on say flight mechanics etc.

The degrees are very similar in terms of the basics e.g. material science, CAD+CFD, Maths etc. It is only really in the third year (or second year at some universities) were things will become a little more specialised towards the discipline.
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man111111
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(Original post by trapking)
Of course it was hard!

-First year: Challenging but the difficulty wasn't too high.
-Second year: Things got a lot harder + a lot more group project work was done.
-Third year: I just wanted to jump off a bridge but some aspects were very enjoyable it was more applied to real world :laugh:




I don't know what you exactly mean by this but an Aerospace Engineer will study a bit more fluid dynamics than a Mechanical Engineer and possibly have a few different modules on say flight mechanics etc.

The degrees are very similar in terms of the basics e.g. material science, CAD+CFD, Maths etc. It is only really in the third year (or second year at some universities) were things will become a little more specialised towards the discipline.
What do mechanical engineers do on a day to day basis?
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man111111
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(Original post by TheMindGarage)
Depends what you prefer. Also, bear in mind that some courses have you do one or even two years of general engineering before choosing a specialism. Apparently quite a lot of people change their minds...
what do you mean by quite a lot of people change their minds. Do they drop out of uni after 2 years?
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trapking
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(Original post by man111111)
What do mechanical engineers do on a day to day basis?
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...nical-engineer
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by man111111)
what do you mean by quite a lot of people change their minds. Do they drop out of uni after 2 years?
Put it this way, when I was a Cambridge engineering day masterclass (for year 12s), we were shown this pair of quotes from a student:

Start of 1st year: "I had no idea what kind of engineer I wanted to be, but I knew I definitely didn't want to be a chemical or civil engineer."
Start of 3rd year: "I've just started my third year, specialising in civil engineering."

(the Cambridge course doesn't really specialise until the third year)
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man111111
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(Original post by trapking)
Of course it was hard!

-First year: Challenging but the difficulty wasn't too high.
-Second year: Things got a lot harder + a lot more group project work was done.
-Third year: I just wanted to jump off a bridge but some aspects were very enjoyable it was more applied to real world :laugh:




I don't know what you exactly mean by this but an Aerospace Engineer will study a bit more fluid dynamics than a Mechanical Engineer and possibly have a few different modules on say flight mechanics etc.

The degrees are very similar in terms of the basics e.g. material science, CAD+CFD, Maths etc. It is only really in the third year (or second year at some universities) were things will become a little more specialised towards the discipline.
I was wondering, if you were given a book that covers the whole course for mechanical engineering.
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Smack
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(Original post by man111111)
I was wondering, if you were given a book that covers the whole course for mechanical engineering.
Different books tend to cover different parts of the course; e.g. a fluid mechanics book will cover different material to a statics/solid mechanics book. I'm not aware of any book that covers the entirety of the mechanical engineering syllabus (which differs between universities anyway), although there might be some really big ones out that cover a lot of the basics, e.g. statics/structures, dynamics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluids, controls etc.
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