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    (Original post by trapking)
    Of course it was hard!

    -First year: Challenging but the difficulty wasn't too high.
    -Second year: Things got a lot harder + a lot more group project work was done.
    -Third year: I just wanted to jump off a bridge but some aspects were very enjoyable it was more applied to real world :laugh:




    I don't know what you exactly mean by this but an Aerospace Engineer will study a bit more fluid dynamics than a Mechanical Engineer and possibly have a few different modules on say flight mechanics etc.

    The degrees are very similar in terms of the basics e.g. material science, CAD+CFD, Maths etc. It is only really in the third year (or second year at some universities) were things will become a little more specialised towards the discipline.
    I was wondering, if you were given a book that covers the whole course for mechanical engineering.
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    (Original post by man111111)
    I was wondering, if you were given a book that covers the whole course for mechanical engineering.
    Different books tend to cover different parts of the course; e.g. a fluid mechanics book will cover different material to a statics/solid mechanics book. I'm not aware of any book that covers the entirety of the mechanical engineering syllabus (which differs between universities anyway), although there might be some really big ones out that cover a lot of the basics, e.g. statics/structures, dynamics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluids, controls etc.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Different books tend to cover different parts of the course; e.g. a fluid mechanics book will cover different material to a statics/solid mechanics book. I'm not aware of any book that covers the entirety of the mechanical engineering syllabus (which differs between universities anyway), although there might be some really big ones out that cover a lot of the basics, e.g. statics/structures, dynamics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluids, controls etc.
    but would most universities give you a few books that would cover all of the content (especially the hard content)
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    (Original post by man111111)
    but would most universities give you a few books that would cover all of the content (especially the hard content)
    No, at university you're generally expected to either purchase the books yourself or loan them from the library.

    You may find that the lecture notes are sufficient, though.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    No, at university you're generally expected to either purchase the books yourself or loan them from the library.

    You may find that the lecture notes are sufficient, though.
    but is it possible to learn all the content from reading the books that you've loaned from the library?
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    (Original post by man111111)
    but is it possible to learn all the content from reading the books that you've loaned from the library?
    University libraries are pretty well stocked so should have all of the required books to complement the course.
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    (Original post by man111111)
    but would most universities give you a few books that would cover all of the content (especially the hard content)
    You often don't need separate books at all. The course notes can be all you need.

    But university libraries are always well stocked with whatever books you want. You don't need to buy any.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    You often don't need separate books at all. The course notes can be all you need.

    But university libraries are always well stocked with whatever books you want. You don't need to buy any.

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    Do universities give you notes or are you expected to write your own notes? In addition, do universities only teach the theory of electronics when you study electrical and electronic engineering or would they also teach students how to build their own circuits...
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    (Original post by man111111)
    Do universities give you notes or are you expected to write your own notes? In addition, do universities only teach the theory of electronics when you study electrical and electronic engineering or would they also teach students how to build their own circuits...
    Both.

    And, sorry I didn't do EEE (I was a CSer a long time ago) but I imagine you'd be working on actual circuits in the weekly EEE labs.
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    (Original post by man111111)
    Do universities give you notes or are you expected to write your own notes? In addition, do universities only teach the theory of electronics when you study electrical and electronic engineering or would they also teach students how to build their own circuits...
    Electrical Engineering: electrical power generation, power conversion, power transmission, large machine applications, high voltage applications, safety, power control systems, electromagnetic emissions and protection, insulation, electrical installations, statutory requirements, marine, automotive, aircraft applications etc.

    Electronic Engineering: analogue and digital design, RF transmissionand reception, small signals, data transmission (multiplexing etc.), data conversion, data logging, error detection and correction, encryption, signal transducers and interfacing, computer control systems, stability criteria, signal conditioning, domain conversion (A/D and D/A.), electronic components construction and design, semiconductor modelling and design, very large scale integrated circuits, computer control systems, PCB's, hardware, firmware, software, programming. This is not an extensive list. You will cover much more.

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering is a mixture of the above two but obviously, can't delve into quite the same depth.

    Yes, you will get extensive lab time, designing, building, testing circuits etc.

    Since engineering is a highly collaborative discipline, you will get assigned a range of projects as part of a team, working closely together and also individually. The latter will be most apparent in the third year where your dissertation will be a major project (hundreds of hours) you do on your own.

    On my course, the team based projects required collaborative analysis, design and developing a solution to a given problem.

    For instance, one of our team tasks was to design and develop an automotive real-time telemetry data system collecting, storing and analysing data for crash testing vehicles. Another was to design an Application Specific Integrated Circuit using NMOS technology including fabrication.

    The various parts of the design will then be split up and individual team members develop their own responsible sub-system, construct and test it. The final stage brings the whole project together to be debugged, tested, demonstrated and formally presented to an audience, then written up and submitted for marking. Your contribution is examined both as an individual and as an active team member.

    There will be several such tasks as well as individual coursework.
 
 
 
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