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If you DON'T buy a remembrance poppy, please say why Watch

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    I can remember the sacrifice made by soldiers without displaying it to the world with a poppy.
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    Personally, I think the poppy meant the most to a particular generation - immediately after the world war one at a time when it directly affected those people. Now, for my generation, and probably yours too (I'm in my 20s) the 1st world war and armistice day do not have a direct personal connection to us. That doesn't mean I don't care - I've watched documentaries, read books etc and it's very sad especially when you read individual stories of soldiers or people left behind. I also recognize the sacrifice that people made and I appreciate that I probably wouldn't be here without that. The same goes for WW2. But as years go by, the sadness becomes less personal as directly affected people pass away. The Armistice agreement was signed almost 100 years ago.

    So although I recognize that I probably wouldn't be here without the sacrifice of the men/women who fought/died in WW1/2 I also wouldn't be here if the Romans/Vikings had murdered my ancestors...but I don't wear anything in particular to pay my respects to them because I don't feel the need to - based on having no emotional closeness to those people.

    Bonfire night is a good example - how many people who went to a firework display or who had a bonfire this month did it because they were celebrating the survival of King James the first? I doubt very much that anyone was going to see fireworks other than for the reason of watching some nice fireworks. It just doesn't mean anything to people anymore - and that's normal, a lot of time has passed.

    Similarly, I don't think that people born from around 1980 onward really consider much when they buy/wear a poppy and if they do, they probably consider those who have died in Kosovo/the Falklands/Afghanistan/Iraq more than the 1st/2nd world wars - since they are more likely to have lost a family member/friend from those conflicts.

    I remember watching 9/11 unfold on the TV when I was 11 and I've never been able to accept people's jokes about that event or to accept people's dismissal of it. I always think about it every time the anniversary comes around and it does haunt me and has affected my outlook on the world/life. But I know that there are people born after 9/11 or not long before it, who have zero emotional connection to it and who don't concern themselves with a minute's silence etc. I don't think that's wrong of them - it's just due to the fact that it didn't really affect them and they have no direct memory of it. I certainly wouldn't shame them into wearing a commemorative flower and it's certainly not expected for TV personalities to justify themselves for not wearing anything to commemorate it....if you see what I'm saying here.

    I don't believe that people will wear poppies in 100 years time. Time moves on and the people to whom certain events and sacrifices meant so much also move on.
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    (Original post by gonelifting)
    Personally, I think the poppy meant the most to a particular generation - immediately after the world war one at a time when it directly affected those people. Now, for my generation, and probably yours too (I'm in my 20s) the 1st world war and armistice day do not have a direct personal connection to us. That doesn't mean I don't care - I've watched documentaries, read books etc and it's very sad especially when you read individual stories of soldiers or people left behind. I also recognize the sacrifice that people made and I appreciate that I probably wouldn't be here without that. The same goes for WW2. But as years go by, the sadness becomes less personal as directly affected people pass away. The Armistice agreement was signed almost 100 years ago.

    So although I recognize that I probably wouldn't be here without the sacrifice of the men/women who fought/died in WW1/2 I also wouldn't be here if the Romans/Vikings had murdered my ancestors...but I don't wear anything in particular to pay my respects to them because I don't feel the need to - based on having no emotional closeness to those people.

    Bonfire night is a good example - how many people who went to a firework display or who had a bonfire this month did it because they were celebrating the survival of King James the first? I doubt very much that anyone was going to see fireworks other than for the reason of watching some nice fireworks. It just doesn't mean anything to people anymore - and that's normal, a lot of time has passed.

    Similarly, I don't think that people born from around 1980 onward really consider much when they buy/wear a poppy and if they do, they probably consider those who have died in Kosovo/the Falklands/Afghanistan/Iraq more than the 1st/2nd world wars - since they are more likely to have lost a family member/friend from those conflicts.

    I remember watching 9/11 unfold on the TV when I was 11 and I've never been able to accept people's jokes about that event or to accept people's dismissal of it. I always think about it every time the anniversary comes around and it does haunt me and has affected my outlook on the world/life. But I know that there are people born after 9/11 or not long before it, who have zero emotional connection to it and who don't concern themselves with a minute's silence etc. I don't think that's wrong of them - it's just due to the fact that it didn't really affect them and they have no direct memory of it. I certainly wouldn't shame them into wearing a commemorative flower and it's certainly not expected for TV personalities to justify themselves for not wearing anything to commemorate it....if you see what I'm saying here.

    I don't believe that people will wear poppies in 100 years time. Time moves on and the people to whom certain events and sacrifices meant so much also move on.
    Very Well put. Agree with you
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    (Original post by NJA)
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    Because it can make a real difference without showing everyone who cares about the poppy by donating money.

    It's the money which helps right?
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    Not made of money.
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    Don't buy and wear one as religiously as I once did because of the appauling anti Muslim sentiments stirred up over it annually now and because of the poppy wearing bullying. Still believe in the cause though.
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    (Original post by gonelifting)
    Personally, I think the poppy meant the most to a particular generation - immediately after the world war one at a time when it directly affected those people. Now, for my generation, and probably yours too (I'm in my 20s) the 1st world war and armistice day do not have a direct personal connection to us. That doesn't mean I don't care - I've watched documentaries, read books etc and it's very sad especially when you read individual stories of soldiers or people left behind. I also recognize the sacrifice that people made and I appreciate that I probably wouldn't be here without that. The same goes for WW2. But as years go by, the sadness becomes less personal as directly affected people pass away. The Armistice agreement was signed almost 100 years ago.

    So although I recognize that I probably wouldn't be here without the sacrifice of the men/women who fought/died in WW1/2 I also wouldn't be here if the Romans/Vikings had murdered my ancestors...but I don't wear anything in particular to pay my respects to them because I don't feel the need to - based on having no emotional closeness to those people.

    Bonfire night is a good example - how many people who went to a firework display or who had a bonfire this month did it because they were celebrating the survival of King James the first? I doubt very much that anyone was going to see fireworks other than for the reason of watching some nice fireworks. It just doesn't mean anything to people anymore - and that's normal, a lot of time has passed.

    Similarly, I don't think that people born from around 1980 onward really consider much when they buy/wear a poppy and if they do, they probably consider those who have died in Kosovo/the Falklands/Afghanistan/Iraq more than the 1st/2nd world wars - since they are more likely to have lost a family member/friend from those conflicts.

    I remember watching 9/11 unfold on the TV when I was 11 and I've never been able to accept people's jokes about that event or to accept people's dismissal of it. I always think about it every time the anniversary comes around and it does haunt me and has affected my outlook on the world/life. But I know that there are people born after 9/11 or not long before it, who have zero emotional connection to it and who don't concern themselves with a minute's silence etc. I don't think that's wrong of them - it's just due to the fact that it didn't really affect them and they have no direct memory of it. I certainly wouldn't shame them into wearing a commemorative flower and it's certainly not expected for TV personalities to justify themselves for not wearing anything to commemorate it....if you see what I'm saying here.

    I don't believe that people will wear poppies in 100 years time. Time moves on and the people to whom certain events and sacrifices meant so much also move on.
    This is exactly how I feel. I'm 19 and the only person I knew who had some kind of connection with the war was my granddad, and he died 10 years ago. He didn't fight in the war, but he was involved somehow. I've never felt the need to wear one. It's not that I don't care or that I don't appreciate what was done for our country, because I really do, it just doesn't have any personal relevance to me in terms of my emotions. I feel sadness thinking about how many people died, but it doesn't deeply affect me.
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    I do not buy one because I am not from the UK; I do not even know when Remembrance Day is!

    I remember back when I did my AS-levels in the UK and everyone just stopped on the streets out of a sudden. I was so confused about what was happening that I went to ask someone, who told me to shush :hide:
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    I tend not to carry coins and, with the greatest respect possible, i'm not going to spend £10 on a poppy.
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    (Original post by gonelifting)
    Personally, I think the poppy meant the most to a particular generation - immediately after the world war one at a time when it directly affected those people. Now, for my generation, and probably yours too (I'm in my 20s) the 1st world war and armistice day do not have a direct personal connection to us. That doesn't mean I don't care - I've watched documentaries, read books etc and it's very sad especially when you read individual stories of soldiers or people left behind. I also recognize the sacrifice that people made and I appreciate that I probably wouldn't be here without that. The same goes for WW2. But as years go by, the sadness becomes less personal as directly affected people pass away. The Armistice agreement was signed almost 100 years ago.

    So although I recognize that I probably wouldn't be here without the sacrifice of the men/women who fought/died in WW1/2 I also wouldn't be here if the Romans/Vikings had murdered my ancestors...but I don't wear anything in particular to pay my respects to them because I don't feel the need to - based on having no emotional closeness to those people.

    Bonfire night is a good example - how many people who went to a firework display or who had a bonfire this month did it because they were celebrating the survival of King James the first? I doubt very much that anyone was going to see fireworks other than for the reason of watching some nice fireworks. It just doesn't mean anything to people anymore - and that's normal, a lot of time has passed.

    Similarly, I don't think that people born from around 1980 onward really consider much when they buy/wear a poppy and if they do, they probably consider those who have died in Kosovo/the Falklands/Afghanistan/Iraq more than the 1st/2nd world wars - since they are more likely to have lost a family member/friend from those conflicts.

    I remember watching 9/11 unfold on the TV when I was 11 and I've never been able to accept people's jokes about that event or to accept people's dismissal of it. I always think about it every time the anniversary comes around and it does haunt me and has affected my outlook on the world/life. But I know that there are people born after 9/11 or not long before it, who have zero emotional connection to it and who don't concern themselves with a minute's silence etc. I don't think that's wrong of them - it's just due to the fact that it didn't really affect them and they have no direct memory of it. I certainly wouldn't shame them into wearing a commemorative flower and it's certainly not expected for TV personalities to justify themselves for not wearing anything to commemorate it....if you see what I'm saying here.

    I don't believe that people will wear poppies in 100 years time. Time moves on and the people to whom certain events and sacrifices meant so much also move on.
    Well written
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    I don't live in the UK and I am able to reflect and remember the dead without wearing one.
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      You don't need to buy a poppy to remember war.
      You don't need to buy a christmas tree to celebrate Yule.
      You don't need to buy an easter egg to celebrate the Spring Equinox
      You don't need to buy fireworks to celebrate parliament nearly being blown up.
      You don't need to buy a wall to celebrate the reunification of Germany

      However, you DO need to buy a poppy in order to virtue signal about your remembering, and to give you the higher ground in order to **** on others for not wearing one.
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      We watch the remembrance programme on the Sunday (today) to remember it. We don't need to buy a poppy to display that we're remembering them.
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      (Original post by NJA)
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      This may sound offensive but I apologise.

      I don't wear or buy a poppy because I dont feel the connection to it. I understand about the sacrifices made and I appreciate them, but i think we do it now out of ceremony than true rememberance.

      An unpopular opinion that I have is that we tend to glorify war and conflict. Almost everyday, there is a programme about the World Wars, Battles of Hastings, Waterloo, Paschendale, Falklands and many others. When there is an international disagreement, we hear the politicians and media beat the drums of war, but don't send their children to fight.

      We are very good at remembering the heinuous crimes of the past, but fail to change as a nation. As we discuss this subject, we still have our men and women out there in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan and other nations fighting conflicts that are either really not for us or based on lies told by our politicians.

      I watched Rememberance Sunday on TV and I saw Tony Blair, who took us to Iraq on a lie, lay a wreath for the fallen. Yet, he and his family are living a good life in the UK without the loss and trauma of war. In the next few decades or century, we would be remembering the Iraq war, when a British PM sent British soldiers to die.

      I think the first step to true rememberance is acknowledging some of the failures of our political system. We should bring our troops home and support them to only fight in real conflicts that affect the UK and defend us.

      We are currently talking about North Korea and, if things go bad, we would be sending more troops to harms way, when this is and has never been about us.

      For me, when periods like this come around, I bow my head in rememberance, say a little prayer for the fallen, and live my life in peaceful co-existence with others.

      I show my support in my own little way, but we must change our ways.
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      Honestly my reason is because I tend not to have change on me. I rarely use physical money to pay for things these days I just use my card because it's easier and if I have money on me it's usually in note form. Unfortunately I'm not going to spend £20 on a poppy I can't afford to do that.
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      I know a lot of people here are saying you don't need to buy a poppy to reflect, but I wear a poppy, and it makes me happy knowing my small donation goes to help veterans. Not only do you donate to something good but you also have something really symbolic. Even if you don't wear a poppy a donation goes a long way as a collective.
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      I don't agree with it.
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      I don't mind giving money to the cause (I haven't this year but there's no particular reason for that), but I'm more a white poppy person in terms of my personal feelings/beliefs, and (as someone else said) really dislike the pressure on people to wear a red poppy. So I don't wear poppies - of any colour - anymore :nah:
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      (Original post by xCaHx)
      I know a lot of people here are saying you don't need to buy a poppy to reflect, but I wear a poppy, and it makes me happy knowing my small donation goes to help veterans. Not only do you donate to something good but you also have something really symbolic. Even if you don't wear a poppy a donation goes a long way as a collective.
      But you don't have to donate when it is time to buy a poppy? The British Legion and other Charities are open everyday and you can donate more than once.

      Apologies, I am not trying to call you out. However, i have seen people put themselves on a pedestal for donating £1 to buy a poppy, when others, who don't wear one, are probably spending more and contributing more to the lives of the veterans and their families.
     
     
     
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