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    I get that having an oxbridge degree opens up almost any door to any career you want. But how do you think a history lecturer at cambridge would feel if he knew that a fair chunk of his students are gonna be interns at canary wharf (or alternative) as soon as they get their degree?
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    (Original post by Mazoorie)
    I get that having an oxbridge degree opens up almost any door to any career you want. But how do you think a history lecturer at cambridge would feel if he knew that a fair chunk of his students are gonna be interns at canary wharf (or alternative) as soon as they get their degree?
    Oxbridge degree doesn’t open ‘almost any door’ in recruit market.

    There’s a big difference between being able to open a door and actually getting a place, either as an intern or as a permanent employee.
    And getting an internship place in financial sector is almost as difficult as getting an actual job there. Often even more difficult if you don’t have a right connection or are not from a certain social background.

    A fair chunk of history students do not become an intern in financial sector (or other alternative).

    If your primary reason for studying at Cambridge is because of your presumption for job prospect rather than genuine passion for the subject, you’ll probably won’t enjoy (or may no even survive) the very demanding and intensive academic environment at Cambridge. And it’s possible admission tutor/interviewers detect it and you won’t get an offer.

    As for how a history lecturer might think of a student like that, you can ask the real Cambridge history lecturer and our resident admission tutor, Murray Edwards Admissions.
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    To be fair, plenty seem to do that. I've just had a look at Gradlink, which is only a tiny proportion of graduates and plenty seem to have gone from History to Finance

    I can see

    History >Deloitte on graduation, now in Corporate Tax
    MPHil Modern Hist > on graduation Private Equity in US
    History > Assistant Fund Manager and onward career in banking
    History > Head of Econometrics and Data
    History > Auditor and NAO
    History > direct into Finance, Goldman Sachs in 3 years
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    To be fair, plenty seem to do that. I've just had a look at Gradlink, which is only a tiny proportion of graduates and plenty seem to have gone from History to Finance

    I can see

    History >Deloitte on graduation, now in Corporate Tax
    MPHil Modern Hist > on graduation Private Equity in US
    History > Assistant Fund Manager and onward career in banking
    History > Head of Econometrics and Data
    History > Auditor and NAO
    History > direct into Finance, Goldman Sachs in 3 years
    Yeah, to be honest I wasn't sure if that was truly happening but almost all graduates I know are currently doing very well in a field they haven't studied. Good on them, I mean I understand History does not lead to a great number of careers but I wonder how exactly the teachers of the universities feel about it? This may be very different from how the actual university as a whole feels as I can imagine any university would be happy to see their degree to rise up to a respectable position. For example, would they accept those who show that they are aware of this trend and are determined not to become part of it?
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    (Original post by Mazoorie)
    ..........
    I don't think they could care less, they are educating students to be happy, successful people, they aren't trying to clone themselves. There are many more students even in one year than there are academic career opportunities. They only have to find one student in a career and their succession planning is done.
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    (Original post by Mazoorie)
    I get that having an oxbridge degree opens up almost any door to any career you want. But how do you think a history lecturer at cambridge would feel if he knew that a fair chunk of his students are gonna be interns at canary wharf (or alternative) as soon as they get their degree?
    Your desired future career is not a factor for Oxbridge admissions.

    That said, if you are applying for History you will need to be very interested in studying a lot of history for 3 internse years.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    To be fair, plenty seem to do that. I've just had a look at Gradlink, which is only a tiny proportion of graduates and plenty seem to have gone from History to Finance

    I can see

    History >Deloitte on graduation, now in Corporate Tax
    MPHil Modern Hist > on graduation Private Equity in US
    History > Assistant Fund Manager and onward career in banking
    History > Head of Econometrics and Data
    History > Auditor and NAO
    History > direct into Finance, Goldman Sachs in 3 years
    They’re not from a one year group, are they? 6 examples among how many?
    And How do they compare to non-History graduates?

    I’d been in the financial sector for many years. It’s true there’re many top university graduates (not only Oxbridge) with degree that’s not Econimics/Finance/Maths-related as they have transferable skills, but I don’t think I’ve come across so many History graduates....

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    though I’m actually one of them. But I entered the sector when things were very different and I had other skills and several years experience in international banking before the career in IB in the City.
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    The point of education is to give people the power, knowledge and ability (all exemplified by qualifications) to decide what they want to do with their life. There's only so many academic historian jobs available, while the number of graduate opportunities in finance, particularly in London, is numerous.
    After my degree (which could be at Oxbridge, but probs get rejected lmao) I would like a job in my degree area, but I imagine many people say this, while in reality when confronted with the need to get a job, they get sucked into the corporate meat grinder. Due the temptation of acquiring a top salary, which with an Oxbridge degree, despite what people say, is still easy.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    They’re not from a one year group, are they? 6 examples among how many?
    And How do they compare to non-History graduates?

    I’d been in the financial sector for many years. It’s true there’re many top university graduates (not only Oxbridge) with degree that’s not Econimics/Finance/Maths-related as they have transferable skills, but I don’t think I’ve come across so many History graduates....

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    though I’m actually one of them. But I entered the sector when things were very different and I had other skills and several years experience in international banking before the career in IB in the City.

    No idea, those are just examples from the grads that have offered to give careers advice. But I attended a number of finance/consulting recruitment events when I was at Cam as a (very mature) student only a few years ago and they were all very positive and welcoming of Arts and Humanities students, often having specific recruitment events for them.

    The gist was that it was people with the skills that make you successful at an 'elite' university that they are interested in, not the subject matter of the degree. Cambridge students need to be able to absorb very large amounts of information, turn it around and apply it quickly and accurately, they need to work hard as a matter of routine, they have to plan, prepare and organise their time etc and those are the skills employers are looking for.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    They’re not from a one year group, are they? 6 examples among how many?
    And How do they compare to non-History graduates?

    I’d been in the financial sector for many years. It’s true there’re many top university graduates (not only Oxbridge) with degree that’s not Econimics/Finance/Maths-related as they have transferable skills, but I don’t think I’ve come across so many History graduates....

    Spoiler:
    Show


    though I’m actually one of them. But I entered the sector when things were very different and I had other skills and several years experience in international banking before the career in IB in the City.

    I know someone who has a very good career in IB and earning good bonuses, but went to one of the lower ranking unis, almost London South Bank equivalent (don’t want to name the actual uni on here as it could identify the person. The degree was finance/law related.

    How common is it for individuals from lower ranking universities to achieve this?
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    No idea, those are just examples from the grads that have offered to give careers advice. But I attended a number of finance/consulting recruitment events when I was at Cam as a (very mature) student only a few years ago and they were all very positive and welcoming of Arts and Humanities students, often having specific recruitment events for them.

    The gist was that it was people with the skills that make you successful at an 'elite' university that they are interested in, not the subject matter of the degree. Cambridge students need to be able to absorb very large amounts of information, turn it around and apply it quickly and accurately, they need to work hard as a matter of routine, they have to plan, prepare and organise their time etc and those are the skills employers are looking for.
    I was involved in recruiting people when I was at IB and I must confess a name of Oxbridge (or other top uni) does sometimes help to open a door better as, as you said, they tend to have good work ethics and ability to work very hard and resilient under pressurised environment which is extremely important quality when working in the financial market where I was.
    So, yes, they’re very keen to meet as many job applicants like that and want to encourage as many aa graduates to apply to them to give them good opportunities to decide which ones to pick up. Exactly the same reason as top unis want as many potential applicants to apply to them.

    Good Arts/Humanities graduates often have a good analytic skills and language students in particular have a very good skill (language) which can be very useful if you’re in the international market.
    So yeah, its nothing new. I have employed a few people because of those skills, too.
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    (Original post by Fruli)
    I know someone who has a very good career in IB and earning good bonuses, but went to one of the lower ranking unis, almost London South Bank equivalent (don’t want to name the actual uni on here as it could identify the person. The degree was finance/law related.

    How common is it for individuals from lower ranking universities to achieve this?
    It's less common, but that's partly because far fewer with that background tend to apply in the first place.

    Fundamentally they are looking for good people, not "good" universities.

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    (Original post by Mazoorie)
    I get that having an oxbridge degree opens up almost any door to any career you want.
    Not true.

    But how do you think a history lecturer at cambridge would feel if he knew that a fair chunk of his students are gonna be interns at canary wharf (or alternative) as soon as they get their degree?
    They don't. What matters is that you have a genuine interest in, and enthusiasm for the subject.

    When I went, the largest employer of Oxford Engineering Science graduates was accountancy.
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    (Original post by Fruli)
    I know someone who has a very good career in IB and earning good bonuses, but went to one of the lower ranking unis, almost London South Bank equivalent (don’t want to name the actual uni on here as it could identify the person. The degree was finance/law related.

    How common is it for individuals from lower ranking universities to achieve this?
    There’re lots of different jobs in ‘IB’. Some don’t even require a university degree.
    And there’re thousands of IBs, too, with different degrees of competitiveness.
    So it is possible to get a job in the sector without a top uni degree, though with big names in the industry it helps if you’re from top uni.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Fundamentally they are looking for good people, not "good" universities.

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    Oh, interesting. It's such a shift from the time I graduated in 2009 when many finance and consultancy entities were looking for a minimum of 360 UCAS points and either Oxbridge or Russell Group.

    I remember there was an exclusive recruitment consultancy start-up called Brightnetwork whose initial aim was to only cater for Oxbridge and so it's been interesting to see its priorities change over the past few years. It now more or less resembles the Graduate Recruitment Bureau.
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    There are tons of transferable skills you get from studying history that can apply virtually anywhere. And the fact that the degree if from Oxbridge makes it that more appealing to employers in the finance sect. as they know oxbridge graduates typically have a high level of intellect and work ethic. Seems perfectly logical to me — and a history professor would understand the skills acquired in historical study that can be transferred to a job in finance better than anyone
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    (Original post by Fruli)
    Oh, interesting. It's such a shift from the time I graduated in 2009 when many finance and consultancy entities were looking for a minimum of 360 UCAS points and either Oxbridge or Russell Group.

    I remember there was an exclusive recruitment consultancy start-up called Brightnetwork whose initial aim was to only cater for Oxbridge and so it's been interesting to see its priorities change over the past few years. It now more or less resembles the Graduate Recruitment Bureau.
    Very sadly, there’re many firms, especially competitive ones popular with graduates, both in financial sector and others, that uses computer algorithm to shift through applications in the first stage of selection/deselection process. Some are programmed to pick up top university names and/or firsts. Even sadder fact is that they have to rely on that kind of system to cope with literally thousands of application.
    One of the reasons why so many universities in recent years giving out so much more firsts to their students than they used to do.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    Very sadly, there’re many firms, especially competitive ones popular with graduates, both in financial sector and others, that uses computer algorithm to shift through applications in the first stage of selection/deselection process. Some are programmed to pick up top university names and/or firsts. One of the reasons why so many universities in recent years giving out so much more firsts to their students than they used to do.
    Oh, that's very interesting.

    I thought there might be a shift from this sort of practice. I've been working in the Talent Assessment industry for 6 years and I thought there might be a move away from this sort of thing, particularly as the likes of EY decided to get rid of the UCAS points requirement.

    In their research, EY found that high UCAS points weren't adding any significant benefits, and in fact by having this UCAS points requirement, they were restricting the range in their graduate pool.
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    (Original post by Fruli)
    Oh, interesting. It's such a shift from the time I graduated in 2009 when many finance and consultancy entities were looking for a minimum of 360 UCAS points and either Oxbridge or Russell Group.

    I remember there was an exclusive recruitment consultancy start-up called Brightnetwork whose initial aim was to only cater for Oxbridge and so it's been interesting to see its priorities change over the past few years. It now more or less resembles the Graduate Recruitment Bureau.
    Some major recruiters now have university-blind policies. Certainly in consulting and law, not sure if it has reached banking yet... but it will.
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    (Original post by Fruli)
    Oh, that's very interesting.

    I thought there might be a shift from this sort of practice. I've been working in the Talent Assessment industry for 6 years and I thought there might be a move away from this sort of thing, particularly as the likes of EY decided to get rid of the UCAS points requirement.

    In their research, EY found that high UCAS points weren't adding any significant benefits, and in fact by having this UCAS points requirement, they were restricting the range in their graduate pool.
    Yep, EY are one of those I was referencing above.

    Need to get DB, Morgan Stanley, Goldman, etc to adopt it too...
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