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I get paid €30,000 per year to do my PhD in Europe, AMA Watch

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    I don't know if "AMA" is still a thing, but let's try it. Maybe some people will find it insightful
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    (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
    I don't know if "AMA" is still a thing, but let's try it. Maybe some people will find it insightful
    What's your Ph.D. in?
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    What's your Ph.D. in?
    It's in the field of mathematics.
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    (Original post by jyai)
    can u pls give me some money
    Not at the moment, sorry. :ashamed2:
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    Who is paying you? Tell me it's Jeremy Corbyn please.
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    (Original post by HoldThisL)
    Who is paying you? Tell me it's Jeremy Corbyn please.
    The university pays me, but their funding is from the Austrian Science Fund.
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    Couple of questions - who's paying you? Why are you getting paid? What are you studying your PhD in? Thanks
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    (Original post by AyoNW)
    Couple of questions - who's paying you? Why are you getting paid? What are you studying your PhD in? Thanks
    As I said before, I am paid by the university since in many countries in Europe (such as Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, et al) PhD "students" are in fact employees of the university and are thus paid a salary. On top of your salary, you are also afforded employee rights, a pension scheme and whatnot.

    I am being paid because the university received funding for a specific project and thus a position was made available. They scouted for candidates and I turned out to be the successful one.

    I don't want to give away my identity, so I apologise for not giving you the specific title of my project. However, it is in the area of mathematics and also has an application.

    Some might find it helpful to know that I found the position courtesy of: http://euro-math-soc.eu/jobs. Of course, that website is specific to mathematics and I am sure that there are other search engines to find relevant positions for other subjects. From my understanding, computer science and engineering PhD candidates are likely to receive even higher salaries (in Germany, for example).
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      (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
      I don't know if "AMA" is still a thing, but let's try it. Maybe some people will find it insightful
      Where and what did you study for your undergrad?
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      (Original post by vela1)
      Where and what did you study for your undergrad?
      I studied mathematics at the University of Aberdeen, but I only achieved a 2:2 due to various reasons although not enough for me to claim "mitigating circumstances".

      In any case, I got my major break when I was accepted for a master programme in the Netherlands and ended up doing quite well there (although not enough to achieve a "*** laude", i.e. a distinction). I think it's useful to bear in mind that while employers in the United Kingdom look very far back through your track record, this is not the case on the continent. In fact, I also made this thread with the idea of making people aware of other opportunities that lie out there.
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      Is that pre or post tax?

      also whats the plans post phd?
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      Hahahah, *** laude.

      That's almost as good as the Cressida **** one.
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      (Original post by Yaboi)
      Is that pre or post tax?
      That would be my gross salary, so pre-tax.

      (Original post by Yaboi)
      also whats the plans post phd?
      I don't have plans to stay in academia, floating from post-doctoral position to post-doctoral position. Instead, I would like to go into industry. My expertise in mathematics is valued in certain areas of industry and the "Dr" title also goes a long way in the Benelux and German speaking world, at least.
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      (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
      That would be my gross salary, so pre-tax.



      I don't have plans to stay in academia, floating from post-doctoral position to post-doctoral position. Instead, I would like to go into industry. My expertise in mathematics is valued in certain areas of industry and the "Dr" title also goes a long way in the Benelux and German speaking world, at least.
      What made you go and do a phd if you dont want to go into academia?
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      (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
      That would be my gross salary, so pre-tax.



      I don't have plans to stay in academia, floating from post-doctoral position to post-doctoral position. Instead, I would like to go into industry. My expertise in mathematics is valued in certain areas of industry and the "Dr" title also goes a long way in the Benelux and German speaking world, at least.
      So you plan on staying in that region for a while then?

      would you say it pays better than the uk?
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      (Original post by madmadmax321)
      What made you go and do a phd if you dont want to go into academia?
      Actually, the vast majority of PhDs do not go into academia; even the ones who want to. There are simply not enough positions.

      As I mentioned already, a PhD is a very valuable title in many European countries and is a necessary requirement for certain positions in industry. After all, industrial companies have research positions.

      This position allows me to attain that title, while providing me with a decent salary and enabling me to specialise in a particular field which is very relevant for where I want to go in the future. Not to mention that the work is very interesting (for me).

      (Original post by Yaboi)
      So you plan on staying in that region for a while then?
      I will simply go wherever the best opportunity presents itself. This has been my philosophy up until now.

      (Original post by Yaboi)
      would you say it pays better than the uk?
      I have friends who are doing their PhDs in the UK. If you are lucky, you are awarded a stipend which tends to be around £1300 a month. Okay, it is untaxed, but it will still not get you very far in the majority of cities. For example, a friend of mine in Manchester still lives in shared housing whereas I can comfortably afford a 65 m^2 flat of my own in the city centre.

      Moreover, the environment is very competitive in the UK. More so than on the continent, I believe. In the situation described above, I would have certainly gone straight into industry.
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      (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
      Moreover, the environment is very competitive in the UK. More so than on the continent, I believe. In the situation described above, I would have certainly gone straight into industry.
      More competitive to gain a place on a PhD programme, or to get a job afterwards?
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      (Original post by plklupu)
      More competitive to gain a place on a PhD programme, or to get a job afterwards?
      Both, from my perspective, if you exclude unfunded PhD programmes.

      I must admit that I don't know the precise facts and figures; however, as I mentioned already, positions in the UK (within both industry and academia) tend to place quite strong filters to weed out candidates with weaker degrees, A-levels and even GCSEs. On the continent, the focus seems to be on just your most recent qualification.

      For example, I am of the opinion that you can apply for a job in the UK with a distinction in your master degree and maybe even a doctorate but they will still halt your application if you have a 2:2. These hurdles are more easily overcome on the continent.
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      (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
      Both, from my perspective, if you exclude unfunded PhD programmes.

      I must admit that I don't know the precise facts and figures; however, as I mentioned already, positions in the UK (within both industry and academia) tend to place quite strong filters to weed out candidates with weaker degrees, A-levels and even GCSEs. On the continent, the focus seems to be on just your most recent qualification.
      Thanks for your answer. I'm seriously considering a route to at least a PhD, and possibly academia if Lady Luck smiles upon me. I might look at PhDs in Europe, being a dirty continental foreigner myself - a slightly less cutthroat market sounds very lucrative. Just gotta get these bloody A Levels sorted first...

      Best of luck in your PhD
     
     
     
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