GAMSAT 2018 for 2019-2020 entry Watch

jay-pakchoi
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Hi everyone!

So glad to have come across this thread! I'm a GAMSAT hopeful too and was planning to take the March exam. But due to work and other things i've had some delay in doing revision and prep. I hear that some people have prepared for the GAMSAT in a month so I'm wondering if I should take the march exam or not. I graduated with a degree in Biomedical Sciences last year with a first and I was hoping to apply for GEM 2019 entry.

Does anyone have any tips with tackling section III? so far i've made a note to concentrate on maths aspect of it all seeing. How are other people tackling the exam?

PS. I'm london based too
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daiigou
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(Original post by jay-pakchoi)
Hi everyone!

So glad to have come across this thread! I'm a GAMSAT hopeful too and was planning to take the March exam. But due to work and other things i've had some delay in doing revision and prep. I hear that some people have prepared for the GAMSAT in a month so I'm wondering if I should take the march exam or not. I graduated with a degree in Biomedical Sciences last year with a first and I was hoping to apply for GEM 2019 entry.

Does anyone have any tips with tackling section III? so far i've made a note to concentrate on maths aspect of it all seeing. How are other people tackling the exam?

PS. I'm london based too
I'd definitely sit the exam even with a months revision. Worst case scenario it's a trial run for September.
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User19999
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Hey, Thank you for the tips.. could you send me the topics list for section III?
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tamsin_athalie
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I'm hoping to sit the GAMSAT in September. I've got an Arts and a Neuroscience background, but I want to brush up on everything. I've not heard many great reviews about the gold standard GAMSAT book and it seems really expensive. Does anyone have any ideas for good study materials? I prefer hard copies, rather than ebooks. I've heard there's some overlap with MCAT for the science questions.
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s2.student
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(Original post by daiigou)
Hi

My advise to you or anyone thinking about starting to revise for GAMSAT is don't think you need to learn everything in terms of facts. What you need to do is try and understand concepts and familiarise yourself with as many as you can. It's a reasoning exam which means they will give you 95% of the information on the page and it's up to you to logically figure out what the right answer is. Get numerate very quickly. That's one of the most important things I did and I went from a section 3 score of 46 to 80 in a year. By numerate I mean learn how to manipulate equations, standard form and logs etc.

For section 1 & 2, ted talks and the ukcat question bank for verbal reasoning helped me a lot. Just remember not to restrict your responses in the essays to a set way because there's no set way.

Finally, and probably the most difficult, learn to enjoy the exam. Having sat it 3 times, I'm actually a little disappointed that I won't have to take it again. That sounds crazy but there's a reason the average people have to take it is 2.5 times.

I took the GradMed course which is honestly invaluable. So if you can afford it (and it's not cheap), I'd 100% advise you go on it. On the other hand, i've got all their study materials, about 25 papers which are honestly so similar to the real thing. Hit me up if you're interested.

Good luck!!
Hi I’m interested in the GRADMED material inbox me the detail please
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
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daiigou
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(Original post by s2.student)
Hi I’m interested in the GRADMED material inbox me the detail please
I'm really sorry, you're about 3 weeks too late. I have sold it. Thanks for reminding me so i can take that previous message down. Good luck
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s2.student
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(Original post by daiigou)
I'm really sorry, you're about 3 weeks too late. I have sold it. Thanks for reminding me so i can take that previous message down. Good luck
no problem thanks, what are your tips of getting a good score in the GAMSAT
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Charlottehall96
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Intending to take the GAMSAT in September in order to apply for GEM in 2020. Currently studying a part-time teaching degree and working full-time in a primary special needs school so I really don't have a science background! Any tips for how to get a decent score in the exam? Thanks
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username2936508
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Guys I just want to chip in here and say that lots of people get good scores without buying expensive prep courses or books. Don't panic if you haven't got a grand lying around for a course.

YouTube is your best friend. It will teach you everything. Just make sure you keep on applying knowledge to questions. Any questions are helpful, and gamsat-styled ones are even better. I liked Khan Academy and Professor Dave Explains the best, but find channels you like.

I have an English degree and no experience of post-GCSE science and I got 64, 72, 50, giving a total score of 59 / 62 depending on how you calculate it. It's not the best score, but frankly it's good enough. I prepared for it around my full job, and my part time job, and fitting in enough work experience.

I had moments during my prep where I thought I was never going to be good enough in section 3 and wanted to give up, but you CAN do it and you just have to keep going.
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sherlockholmes96
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Hi, I would write as many practice essays as possible and look at "Leah4sci MCAT maths without a calculator" on youtube - the latter helped me with all the maths prep. When you register you also get some free practice Qs which are good to go through in timed conditions. Good luck.
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blessedbytheone
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(Original post by Mincepiemmmm)
Guys I just want to chip in here and say that lots of people get good scores without buying expensive prep courses or books. Don't panic if you haven't got a grand lying around for a course.

YouTube is your best friend. It will teach you everything. Just make sure you keep on applying knowledge to questions. Any questions are helpful, and gamsat-styled ones are even better. I liked Khan Academy and Professor Dave Explains the best, but find channels you like.

I have an English degree and no experience of post-GCSE science and I got 64, 72, 50, giving a total score of 59 / 62 depending on how you calculate it. It's not the best score, but frankly it's good enough. I prepared for it around my full job, and my part time job, and fitting in enough work experience.

I had moments during my prep where I thought I was never going to be good enough in section 3 and wanted to give up, but you CAN do it and you just have to keep going.
Hey thanks for the good tips! I come from a science background but I haven't done physics since GCSEs. How do you know what to search up on youtube and what to learn? Do you have some kind of specification you follow? Your help is much appreciated!
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username2936508
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(Original post by blessedbytheone)
Hey thanks for the good tips! I come from a science background but I haven't done physics since GCSEs. How do you know what to search up on youtube and what to learn? Do you have some kind of specification you follow? Your help is much appreciated!
I used the syllabus guide from the Griffiths review. You can find other suggested topic lists online for free though.

Edit - it's actually really important you have a list of key topics to target instead of just learning a whole lecture series from Youtube. I would recommend focusing your revision on learning the basics of chemistry, and then moving on to organic chemistry, physics, and MINIMAL biology. All you really need to know for biology is a few basics about cells and be comfortable with the kinds of genetics questions that they ask.

Oh and I've heard some people say they use the Letts Revise books as topic guides. These are really old books that have a summary of a topic and then pages of questions. They won't teach you enough about the subject on their own (supplement with youtube), but you can use the summary for revision and more importantly, use the questions! Here's an example of the range I'm talking about:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Physics-Rev...+level+physics

They are also recommended by the Griffiths review.

Here's a list my friend sent me that she said she found online:


Concepts to know:

  1. 1. Maths (VERY BASIC)
    1. a. Measurements
      1. i. Convert between units
      2. ii. 1mL=1cm^3
      3. iii. scientific notification
      4. iv. know units
    2. b. Operators
      1. i. Order of operations (PEDMAS)
      2. ii. Exponents
      3. iii. Square and square roots
    3. c. Equations
      1. i. Fundamental algebra
      2. ii. Equating equations, words to equations, manipulate units
    4. d. Statistics
      1. i. Basics of probability
      2. ii. Mean and SD
    5. e. Trigonometry
      1. i. Apply Pythagoras theorem
      2. ii. Manipulate cos, sin, tan ratios in equations
      3. iii. Angles and degrees
    6. f. Logarithms
      1. i. Components of a logarithm
      2. ii. Apply in context of pH and pKA
      3. iii. Interpret graphical representations
    7. g. Graphs
      1. i. Interpret graphs
      2. ii. Trends: linear, exponential, sigmoidal
      3. iii. Significance of area under a curve ex. Velocity versus time the area under the curve is displacement
      4. iv. Tangents to curve
      5. v. Change in conditions effect graph
  2. 2. Physics (BASICS)
    1. a. Vectors and scalars
      1. i. Perform vector addition and basic trigonometry
    2. b. Motion
      1. i. Displacement, velocity, acceleration, circular motion, projectile motion and equations
      2. ii. Interpret and predict graphs of motion
    3. c. Forces
      1. i. Understand and apply newtons laws
      2. ii. Understand gravity, normal force, tension, torque, springs and friction
      3. iii. Determine centre of gravity and net force affecting it
      4. iv. F=ma
    4. d. Energy
      1. i. Nature of energy and conservation
      2. ii. Rules for potential and kinetic energy
      3. iii. Equate and resolve various forms of energy
    5. e. Work
      1. i. Work and W=Fd
      2. ii. Know the relationships between work, energy and power
    6. f. Momentum
      1. i. Momentum and conservation
      2. ii. Impulse and understand graphically
    7. g. Simple machines
      1. i. Inclined plane, pulley and lever
      2. ii. Apply concepts of work and energy to machines
    8. h. Fluids
      1. i. Pressure, density, specific gravity
      2. ii. Principle of buoyancy
      3. iii. Predict flow of fluids
    9. i. Solids
      1. i. Understand thermal expansion
    10. j. Magnetism
      1. i. Understand/apply concepts of magnetic and electric fields
      2. ii. Use right hand rule to predict the force of a particle
    11. k. Electricity
      1. i. Rules of charge
      2. ii. Predict effect of charged particles on each other
      3. iii. How charge through a wire is related to electric and magnetic fields
    12. l. Circuits
      1. i. Series and parallel circuits
      2. ii. Resistance, current or voltage of circuits
      3. iii. Effect of changes to circuit
    13. m. Waves
      1. i. Terminology and types of waves
      2. ii. Relationship between velocity, frequency and wavelength
      3. iii. Predict the result of interference
      4. iv. Understand simple harmonic motion
    14. n. Sound
      1. i. Decibel scale
      2. ii. Doppler effect and beat frequency
    15. o. Light
      1. i. Reflection and refraction
      2. ii. Predict path of light as it traverses through different media
      3. iii. Lenses and mirrors
      4. iv. Predict location and dimensions of images formed by mirrors and lenses
    16. p. Radioactivity
      1. i. Half life
      2. ii. Radioactive decay and properties
  3. 3. Chemistry (EXTENSIVE YEAR 1)
    1. a. Atoms and periodic table
      1. i. Element, simplest form of a substance (don’t confuse with substance) composed of ob
      2. ii. Alkaline metals-highly reactive metals (blow-up in water!)
      3. iii. Transition
      4. iv. Nature of atoms
      5. v. Trends in periodic table, patterns regarding atomic size and electronegativity
      6. vi. Ionization energy, amount of energy needed to steel an electron away from an atom (low ionization energy for a weak bond)
      7. vii. Different category of elements, features and common elements
    2. b. Stoichiometry
      1. i. Interconvert units especially with regard to moles and molecular weights
      2. ii. Balance equations
    3. c. Bonding and quantum mechanics
      1. i. Types of bonding
        1. 1. covalent bonds, share electrons
        2. 2. ionic bonds, steals electrons
      2. ii. Electronegativity and polarity of molecules
      3. iii. Shapes of molecules according to VSEPR theory
      4. iv. Effect of electron withdrawing groups
      5. v. Hybridized bonding and how it affects bond strength
      6. vi. Electron orbitals and quantum numbering
    4. d. Kinetics and equilibrium
      1. i. Understand/apply Le Chatelier’s principle
      2. ii. Know the effect of heat, catalysist, and change in concentrations on reaction rates
      3. iii. Calculate the rate and order of a reaction
      4. iv. Know equivalence and equilibrium points and interpret graphically
    5. e. States of Matter
      1. i. Substance that cannot be separated into things
      2. ii. Solid- fixed shape and volume
      3. iii. Gas- occupies the space
      4. iv. Liquid- fixed volume
      5. v. Understand/apply the ideal gas laws to predict the deviation of real gases from the law
    6. f. Solutions
      1. i. Know how changed conditions will affect solubility, temperature, pH, chemical concentrations, pressure
      2. ii. Apply Ksp values to determine solubility and precipitation
      3. iii. Understand how chemical properties affect solubility
    7. g. Phase changes and colligative properties
      1. i. Understand heat capacity and specific heat
      2. ii. Interpret phase diagrams
      3. iii. Understand vapour pressure and Raoult’s law
      4. iv. Understand how vapour pressure impacts boiling and melting points
      5. v. Understand and apply the concepts of boiling point elevation and freezing point depression
    8. h. Thermodynamics
      1. i. Laws of thermodynamics
      2. ii. Understand entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs Free Energy
      3. iii. Predict whether a reaction will be spontaneous
      4. iv. Predict whether a reaction will be exothermic or endothermic
    9. i. Acids and bases
      1. i. Understand what pH is and be able to calc H and OH ion concentrations
      2. ii. Understand pKA values and how they relate to pH values
      3. iii. Know the links between an acid or base and its conjugate
      4. iv. Predict whether a molecule will act as an acid or base depending on its structure
      5. v. Understand the acid base titrations graphically
      6. vi. Understand how molecular stability, solubility and electronegativity relate to acidity
      7. vii. Predict how an acid-base indicator will respond to a solution, given pH and pKA values
    10. j. Electrochemisty
      1. i. Reduction and oxidation reactions
      2. ii. Predict which molecule will act as an oxidising agent or reducing agent
      3. iii. Apply E values to calculate the potential of a cell and direction of a reaction
      4. iv. Apply E values to compare reduction potentials
      5. v. Understand the components of galvanic cell and how electrons and ions flow in such a cell
  4. 4. Organic Chemistry (very BASIC) hydroCARBON chemistry!
    1. a. Nomenclature
      1. i. Understand and apply IUPAC naming conventions
      2. ii. Draw molecular structures from chemical name and vice-versa
    2. b. Sterochemisty
      1. i. Differentiate between isomers
      2. ii. Chirality
      3. iii. Enantiomers and diastereomers
      4. iv. Visualise the rotation of molecules and determine their stereochemistry
      5. v. Recognise Fischer and Haworth structures
      6. vi. Apply the R-S naming system
    3. c. Hydrocarbons
      1. i. Alkanes, alkenes, alkynes
      2. ii. Structure of alcohol, carboxylic acids, esters, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, amines, and amides
      3. iii. Properties and effects of the major functional groups
    4. d. Organic reactions
      1. i. Resonance and tautomerisation
      2. ii. Common organic reactions
      3. iii. Predict the type of reaction organic molecules will undergo
      4. iv. Apply concepts of electronegativity and acid base chemistry to organic molecules
  5. 5. Biology (BASIC but inclusive)
    1. a. Genetics
      1. i. Medellin genetics and construct and interpret punnet squares
      2. ii. Basic nature of DNA and features
      3. iii. Sexual reproduction
    2. b. The heart
      1. i. Physiology of heart and blood flow
      2. ii. Pressure and volume operate in heart
      3. iii. Predict impact of changes in heart physiology
    3. c. The lungs
      1. i. Physiology of lungs
      2. ii. Process of breathing and gas exchange
      3. iii. Predict the impact of changes in lung physiology
    4. d. The kidneys
      1. i. Structure and function
      2. ii. Filtration
      3. iii. Concentration and pressure gradients
      4. iv. Cellular transport
    5. e. The nervous system
      1. i. Components of the nervous system
      2. ii. Different nervous systems
        1. 1. ANS
        2. 2. PNS
        3. 3. CNS
      3. iii. Feedback regulation
    6. f. Cells
      1. i. Parts of a cell
      2. ii. Mitosis- single cell division to two cells, chromosomes replicate but remain attached to centriole (center) and identical DNA is pulled apart until the cell divides
      3. iii. Meiosis- (sperm and egg cells are created this way) they only have half the DNA, first chromosomes replicate, matched pairs align themselves at centromere some DNA may be passed between matched pairs (crossover) cell divides and divides again.
        1. 1. Meiosis 1 first division
        2. 2. Meiosis 2 second division leaves 4 daughter cells with 1 half of DNA in each 4 cells
      4. iv. osmosis
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tough2
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(Original post by blessedbytheone)
Hey I'd be interested in that!
Awesome, can you message me your email and phone number, so I can add you in the group?
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Oves
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Im currently doing respiratory physiology did my Alevels 2 years ago had BBB in maths chesmitry and biology so im not too bothered with section 3. but i did UKCAT 2years ago and got 2600 so i am really scared about the section 1 and 2 which involves essay and reading stuff. looking to take my GAMSAT in september any idea where to get cheap resource now so i can practice alot before hand?. if there are any group going around someone pls direct me in the right direction. thanks.
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username2936508
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(Original post by judeogbokor)
Im currently doing respiratory physiology did my Alevels 2 years ago had BBB in maths chesmitry and biology so im not too bothered with section 3. but i did UKCAT 2years ago and got 2600 so i am really scared about the section 1 and 2 which involves essay and reading stuff. looking to take my GAMSAT in september any idea where to get cheap resource now so i can practice alot before hand?. if there are any group going around someone pls direct me in the right direction. thanks.
I don't think UKCAT performance correlates with GAMSAT performance very much.

I'm terrible at the UKCAT. I did it 4 times before I finally scored enough to get an interview at Warwick this year (still only got 692.5 average though). I did much better in sections 1 and 2 of the GAMSAT despite doing poorly in the UKCAT verbal reasoning (this year I got 800 in QR, which pulled my average up; I got something like 640/650 in VR).

I know others who have got nowhere sitting the UKCAT but sat the GAMSAT and got 4 interviews. GAMSAT is largely a test of your endurance during the preparation stage, while UKCAT remains a mystery to me. If you put a solid amount of work into the GAMSAT you will likely do ok.
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Oves
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(Original post by Mincepiemmmm)
I don't think UKCAT performance correlates with GAMSAT performance very much.

I'm terrible at the UKCAT. I did it 4 times before I finally scored enough to get an interview at Warwick this year (still only got 692.5 average though). I did much better in sections 1 and 2 of the GAMSAT despite doing poorly in the UKCAT verbal reasoning (this year I got 800 in QR, which pulled my average up; I got something like 640/650 in VR).

I know others who have got nowhere sitting the UKCAT but sat the GAMSAT and got 4 interviews. GAMSAT is largely a test of your endurance during the preparation stage, while UKCAT remains a mystery to me. If you put a solid amount of work into the GAMSAT you will likely do ok.
i might just not do ukcat and remove the university that requires it from my selection
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username2936508
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(Original post by judeogbokor)
i might just not do ukcat and remove the university that requires it from my selection
That's not a terrilble idea, but it is definitely possible to get better at the UKCAT. I can't even remember what I got the first time I sat it but it was low 600s, whereas this year I was 83rd percentile.

My strategy last year was to allocate around 6 weeks of my GAMSAT prep to focusing on UKCAT alongside some relatively light GAMSAT revision (I think I did biology at this point? Or some section 1 practice? I don't actually remember). I sat the UKCAT on the first day of testing (early July) so I could decide whether to just drop the UKCAT unis and focus on GAMSAT for the next 2.5 months if it didn't go well.

Also as a non-scientist with no science A levels I struggled to fill my choices without doing both exams....
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Oves
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(Original post by Mincepiemmmm)
That's not a terrilble idea, but it is definitely possible to get better at the UKCAT. I can't even remember what I got the first time I sat it but it was low 600s, whereas this year I was 83rd percentile.

My strategy last year was to allocate around 6 weeks of my GAMSAT prep to focusing on UKCAT alongside some relatively light GAMSAT revision (I think I did biology at this point? Or some section 1 practice? I don't actually remember). I sat the UKCAT on the first day of testing (early July) so I could decide whether to just drop the UKCAT unis and focus on GAMSAT for the next 2.5 months if it didn't go well.

Also as a non-scientist with no science A levels I struggled to fill my choices without doing both exams....
good advice i will drop wales and put in warwick and then just do UKCAT in early summer giving me 2months to prep for GAMSAT
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orchid124
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Hey just wanted to pop in give my 2 cents about the gamsat. I read a lot of these forums before I sat it and they did freak me out as a bit as some people said they had revised for 5 hours a day every day for 6 months etc...I revised maybe an hour a day (not every day) for 2 months and got 71. I agree with mincepiemmmm that its not necessary to fork out for an expensive course (I really wish they didn't exist, I think it's pretty *****y they do- no judgement if you can afford it though)- but I did use the Des O'Neill books which i attribute my score to (especially section 2). I got a photocopied version from ebay for £25, and printed it out in sections at work.
For section 1 I worked through the majority of the question bank in the Des O'Neill book. By checking the answers you start to get a feel for what they are looking for. Some people say reading is very helpful for this section and section 2. I think reading widely is useful anyway but if you're short on time I wouldn't worry too much about that. I think it helps a lot to do practice questions and you just get a sixth sense for what they want.
For section 2 I actually didn't practice writing any essays which was a bit risky but I didn't have the time. I got 75 though. I read a lot of the examples in the Des book and made notes on what they recommended. I wouldn't have had a clue what the GAMSAT markers were looking for without having had that guidance!
For section 3 I got the Letts revision guides to guide the curriculum. Mostly it was just refreshing my knowledge, but physics I had to learn from scratch a bit. It's very useful being comfortable with your mental maths as you won't have time to double check working out and can't spend ages doing simple sums either. Particularly with this section (although applicable to the others too) you have to get in the mindset. The best way to improve your score is to answer as much as possible- some questions of course will require a bit more time, but if you're struggling, move on. If you know balancing equations takes you ages for example, leave those out.
On the day: don't panic, walk there to get your blood flowing, sit up straight in your seat, breathe deeply and smile; its just an exam, there's always next year ! Good luck!
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blessedbytheone
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(Original post by Mincepiemmmm)
I used the syllabus guide from the Griffiths review. You can find other suggested topic lists online for free though.

Edit - it's actually really important you have a list of key topics to target instead of just learning a whole lecture series from Youtube. I would recommend focusing your revision on learning the basics of chemistry, and then moving on to organic chemistry, physics, and MINIMAL biology. All you really need to know for biology is a few basics about cells and be comfortable with the kinds of genetics questions that they ask.

Oh and I've heard some people say they use the Letts Revise books as topic guides. These are really old books that have a summary of a topic and then pages of questions. They won't teach you enough about the subject on their own (supplement with youtube), but you can use the summary for revision and more importantly, use the questions! Here's an example of the range I'm talking about:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Physics-Rev...+level+physics

They are also recommended by the Griffiths review.

Here's a list my friend sent me that she said she found online:


Concepts to know:
Hey thanks for that! You have just saved me loaaaaaaaaads of time. Cheers!
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