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What is your opinion on MB/PhD programs at uni if doing it? Watch

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    (Original post by ecolier)
    I am specialising in neurology in medicine, which is why I would like to help those who are interested in neuroscience!
    Hey, I was wondering if you could give me some advice. I plan to study medicine and then work either towards being a cardiothoracic surgeon or a neurosurgeon. Are there any books you would suggest I should read or any articles (JStore preferably) which I can talk about in my interview and that would give me insight into the field.
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    (Original post by kaytoner)
    I never brought gender into this
    Just pointing out that not all registrars are the boring middle-aged men that you know...
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    Hey, I was wondering if you could give me some advice. I plan to study medicine and then work either towards being a cardiothoracic surgeon or a neurosurgeon. Are there any books you would suggest I should read or any articles (JStore preferably) which I can talk about in my interview and that would give me insight into the field.
    Might sound a bit naive to say in your interview that you definitely want to be a neurosurgeon or cardiothoracic surgeon.

    But for your own interest:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Do-No-Harm-.../dp/0297869876

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Admissions-...BZAJYGBK8HJDPD

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fragile-Liv.../dp/0008196761

    I haven't read any of them, but they appear to be well-received.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Might sound a bit naive to say in your interview that you definitely want to be a neurosurgeon or cardiothoracic surgeon.

    But for your own interest:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Do-No-Harm-.../dp/0297869876

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Admissions-...BZAJYGBK8HJDPD

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fragile-Liv.../dp/0008196761

    I haven't read any of them, but they appear to be well-received.
    won't really mention it but I hear it is beneficial if you have read stuff before linking to medicine thats why.
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    won't really mention it but I hear it is beneficial if you have read stuff before linking to medicine thats why.
    It's good to have something to aim for. Good books suggested above but for our specialty I would recommend "Phantoms in the Brain" and "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat". Both inspired me to do neurology.

    If you can backup your choice of career with insight - i.e. know a bit about the Glasgow Coma Scale (for neurosurgery), range of operation etc. etc. then I suppose it could work. Otherwise it will just be "I want to be a CT surgeon" "Ok, what does it involve?" "erm...." (won't go down well)
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    It's good to have something to aim for. Good books suggested above but for our specialty I would recommend "Phantoms in the Brain" and "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat". Both inspired me to do neurology.

    If you can backup your choice of career with insight - i.e. know a bit about the Glasgow Coma Scale (for neurosurgery), range of operation etc. etc. then I suppose it could work. Otherwise it will just be "I want to be a CT surgeon" "Ok, what does it involve?" "erm...." (won't go down well)
    True. Will have a look at them. thanks
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    (Original post by ecolier)
    It's good to have something to aim for. Good books suggested above but for our specialty I would recommend "Phantoms in the Brain" and "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat". Both inspired me to do neurology.
    *Faints*

    You're the first person I've come across on here who's actually become a neurologist after reading those books - everyone seems to put them on their personal statement but I think the vast majority change choice of specialty when they get through med school!
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    *Faints*

    You're the first person I've come across on here who's actually become a neurologist after reading those books - everyone seems to put them on their personal statement but I think the vast majority change choice of specialty when they get through med school!

    I know eh?! I do like my cognitive neurology and may sub-specialise in it! It's either that or movement disorders...
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    (Original post by carraiga)
    1) from my understanding It saves time as I'd be working towards PhD and MD simultaneously, rather than first MD/MB and then PhD
    Your understanding is off - you don't do simultaneous med school and PhD - that would be insane. You do a PhD in the middle of a normal med school course, with no time being saved. If anything, it might actually be longer.

    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I'm not sure how common these are - Cambridge and UCL have them. Does anywhere else?
    Oxford of course allow people to embed PhDs into the medical course. You arrange it in third year though on a less formal basis than Cambridge/UCL.

    I'd imagine a similar arrangement would be possible at most unis, though i have no idea how common it is.

    2. Do a PhD once you're already a clinically-qualified doctor. Some people do advise this, since you are most likely to know what you want to specialise in and it can be more relevant to your chosen career. I don't really know enough to offer advice on which option, 1 or 2, is "better". I suspect they each have their pros and cons.
    If you do it as a doctor your pay is also higher, you can work locums alongside and the PhD is on average shorter, so i'm told. From the people I've spoken to the consensus is that its much better to do it as a doctor not a med student.

    The obvious exception would be someone who actually finds they prefer research and don't return to complete clinical school.

    (Original post by kaytoner)
    And yes I'm applying to Cambridge - as far as I'm aware they're a pioneer in this ...
    A pioneer in what lol - research in general? People doing PhDs?

    (Original post by kaytoner)
    Just didn't think a registrar would be on TSR and especially not with a snoopy profile pic- The registrars I know are boring middle aged men
    There are a few registrars who post here and I think I'm correct in saying that nationwide most registrars are female. Most doctors are female, after all.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    There are a few registrars who post here and I think I'm correct in saying that nationwide most registrars are female. Most doctors are female, after all.
    You would be correct in many specialties, but not ours (certainly not in this area)

    (I am not middle aged though - or at least I hope I'm not... Maybe in the eyes of 16 year olds :cry:)
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Your understanding is off - you don't do simultaneous med school and PhD - that would be insane. You do a PhD in the middle of a normal med school course, with no time being saved. If anything, it might actually be longer.
    huh, I swear I thought I read something about doing clinical work as well, while working on your PhD, to satisfy the medical school's requirement of keeping in touch with clinical practice or something


    (Original post by nexttime)

    A pioneer in what lol - research in general? People doing PhDs?
    Pioneer isn't the correct word, but if I read right I'm pretty sure they were the first uni to offer the MBPhD program to undergrads
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    (Original post by kaytoner)
    huh, I swear I thought I read something about doing clinical work as well, while working on your PhD, to satisfy the medical school's requirement of keeping in touch with clinical practice or something


    I think at Cambridge you're meant to have one clinical supervision per week (or something like that) during the PhD years.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I think at Cambridge you're meant to have one clinical supervision per week (or something like that) during the PhD years.

    exactly, I suppose due to it's unconventional-ness it isn't recognized by other users who posted here

    @nexttime this is what I was talking about
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    (Original post by kaytoner)
    thanks for advice

    also you a med student?
    Yes, Oxbridge aren't the only places offering an 'integrated' PhD, but probably have the most established courses.

    It's not a 60/40 split for academic and clinical duties - I think that's what other posters were referring to. I doubt you have any proper clinical time at all, the girl I mentioned doing it could barely remember how to do a rectal exam (she was showing me round the new clinical skills lab and mentioned how deskilled she had become).

    Anyways good luck you obviously have a bright future ahead.
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    (Original post by kaytoner)
    exactly, I suppose due to it's unconventional-ness it isn't recognized by other users who posted here

    @nexttime this is what I was talking about
    That's like 1.5 hours per week though btw.
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    (Original post by kaytoner)
    huh, I swear I thought I read something about doing clinical work as well, while working on your PhD, to satisfy the medical school's requirement of keeping in touch with clinical practice or something
    Sure, but the degree still takes 9 or more likely 10 years, not 5-6. You aren't saving time by doing both as you seem to think.

    Pioneer isn't the correct word, but if I read right I'm pretty sure they were the first uni to offer the MBPhD program to undergrads
    Med students have been doing PhDs for hundreds of years. Perhaps Cambridge was the first formal program, i don't know. Its certainly not a new idea though.
 
 
 
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