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Would this count as "extenuating circumstances" ???? Watch

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    Hi all, my tutor group leader is currently writing references for us and so forth. i was wondering if a really really bad teacher can be a reason to put down as 'extenuating circumstances', this may sound subjective however, i was in set 2 out of a possible 5. (set 1 being best) i have had a high exposure to numbers as a kid and did quite well always from years 7 - 9. however when we started gcse we got a new teacher. she was literally 21 (straight from her degree and then first teaching job) and we were 16. she was incredibly bad and could not convey anything properly. we never did past paper questions in class and she used to get basic concepts wrong (we regularly corrected her). i had her for all year 10.. a waste. then for year 11 until December. when we did gcse mocks our whole class got lower than set 3 at the time (everyone got below a C) the school found this worrying and did a formal investigation. after that she was sacked lol..... after seeing her teach then the head of maths taught us everything from scratch from January to June. including all basic year 10 concepts. managed to get a B but literally could of done a lot better considering we had a rubbish teacher which consequently led to me being demotivated in the subject........ is it extenuating though ??? thanks
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    I'm not entirely sure but honestly it sounds like you are making excuses for not doing as well as you had hoped. Most people have bad teachers at some point in their education.
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    (Original post by Light.Y)
    Hi all, my tutor group leader is currently writing references for us and so forth. i was wondering if a really really bad teacher can be a reason to put down as 'extenuating circumstances', this may sound subjective however, i was in set 2 out of a possible 5. (set 1 being best) i have had a high exposure to numbers as a kid and did quite well always from years 7 - 9. however when we started gcse we got a new teacher. she was literally 21 (straight from her degree and then first teaching job) and we were 16. she was incredibly bad and could not convey anything properly. we never did past paper questions in class and she used to get basic concepts wrong (we regularly corrected her). i had her for all year 10.. a waste. then for year 11 until December. when we did gcse mocks our whole class got lower than set 3 at the time (everyone got below a C) the school found this worrying and did a formal investigation. after that she was sacked lol..... after seeing her teach then the head of maths taught us everything from scratch from January to June. including all basic year 10 concepts. managed to get a B but literally could of done a lot better considering we had a rubbish teacher which consequently led to me being demotivated in the subject........ is it extenuating though ??? thanks
    Doesn't hurt trying, especially if you believe that it has a huge impact on your grade.
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    (Original post by Alison12345)
    I'm not entirely sure but honestly it sounds like you are making excuses for not doing as well as you had hoped. Most people have bad teachers at some point in their education.
    i agree it seems subjective, but it was to the point the school sacked her.... so im not making a pretentious statement.
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    i had a similar situation where a fresh young teacher tried to teach A-level maths to about 30-35 of us engineering students. After the first year about 15 or so dropped out because they found it too difficult (in reality the teacher was bad at explaining and constantly made mistakes which confused everyone). By the time we took our AS...only 2 of us got a passing grade. I got an A but only because i taught myself the entire syllabus before starting the college...and the other student who passed had a private tutor the whole year. (He still just scraped a C). The teacher didn't stay on to teach A2 maths...apparently she "got a job somewhere else." :s
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    (Original post by Light.Y)
    i agree it seems subjective, but it was to the point the school sacked her.... so im not making a pretentious statement.
    Fair enough, it's worth a try then.
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    (Original post by Light.Y)
    Hi all, my tutor group leader is currently writing references for us and so forth. i was wondering if a really really bad teacher can be a reason to put down as 'extenuating circumstances', this may sound subjective however, i was in set 2 out of a possible 5. (set 1 being best) i have had a high exposure to numbers as a kid and did quite well always from years 7 - 9. however when we started gcse we got a new teacher. she was literally 21 (straight from her degree and then first teaching job) and we were 16. she was incredibly bad and could not convey anything properly. we never did past paper questions in class and she used to get basic concepts wrong (we regularly corrected her). i had her for all year 10.. a waste. then for year 11 until December. when we did gcse mocks our whole class got lower than set 3 at the time (everyone got below a C) the school found this worrying and did a formal investigation. after that she was sacked lol..... after seeing her teach then the head of maths taught us everything from scratch from January to June. including all basic year 10 concepts. managed to get a B but literally could of done a lot better considering we had a rubbish teacher which consequently led to me being demotivated in the subject........ is it extenuating though ??? thanks
    No, I’m afraid it isn’t. Extenuating circumstances is medical illness or family death, in most cases.

    It’s something that may be worth mentioning or taken into consideration by universities, but there’s no guarantees.
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    (Original post by FloralHybrid)
    No, I’m afraid it isn’t. Extenuating circumstances is medical illness or family death, in most cases.

    It’s something that may be worth mentioning or taken into consideration by universities, but there’s no guarantees.
    I agree. It would be similar to claiming extenuating circumstances for having been brought up in south London.
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    (Original post by Light.Y)
    Hi all, my tutor group leader is currently writing references for us and so forth. i was wondering if a really really bad teacher can be a reason to put down as 'extenuating circumstances', this may sound subjective however, i was in set 2 out of a possible 5. (set 1 being best) i have had a high exposure to numbers as a kid and did quite well always from years 7 - 9. however when we started gcse we got a new teacher. she was literally 21 (straight from her degree and then first teaching job) and we were 16. she was incredibly bad and could not convey anything properly. we never did past paper questions in class and she used to get basic concepts wrong (we regularly corrected her). i had her for all year 10.. a waste. then for year 11 until December. when we did gcse mocks our whole class got lower than set 3 at the time (everyone got below a C) the school found this worrying and did a formal investigation. after that she was sacked lol..... after seeing her teach then the head of maths taught us everything from scratch from January to June. including all basic year 10 concepts. managed to get a B but literally could of done a lot better considering we had a rubbish teacher which consequently led to me being demotivated in the subject........ is it extenuating though ??? thanks
    This is the 21st century, there is absolutely no reason that you couldn’t have accessed one of the many online resources to make up for the lack of teaching quality. There is an argument for why your mitigating circumstances would not be accepted if I’m honest.
    You have access to the syllabus and therefore could have used things like khan academy to independently cover topics.
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    (Original post by Light.Y)
    Hi all, my tutor group leader is currently writing references for us and so forth. i was wondering if a really really bad teacher can be a reason to put down as 'extenuating circumstances', this may sound subjective however, i was in set 2 out of a possible 5. (set 1 being best) i have had a high exposure to numbers as a kid and did quite well always from years 7 - 9. however when we started gcse we got a new teacher. she was literally 21 (straight from her degree and then first teaching job) and we were 16. she was incredibly bad and could not convey anything properly. we never did past paper questions in class and she used to get basic concepts wrong (we regularly corrected her). i had her for all year 10.. a waste. then for year 11 until December. when we did gcse mocks our whole class got lower than set 3 at the time (everyone got below a C) the school found this worrying and did a formal investigation. after that she was sacked lol..... after seeing her teach then the head of maths taught us everything from scratch from January to June. including all basic year 10 concepts. managed to get a B but literally could of done a lot better considering we had a rubbish teacher which consequently led to me being demotivated in the subject........ is it extenuating though ??? thanks
    What are the references for uni or GCSE sixth form?

    GCSE yes if she was fired for incompetence, no for uni if it happened in year 10.
 
 
 
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