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    Good day to everyone reading this,

    It's been a dream of mine to teach English as a foreign language abroad in Japan. Yet the means of achieving that dream are quite uncertain as I have read multiple sources stating that any uni course (with a certain focus on literary skills) is sufficient enough to teach English abroad. Whereas other sources have stated that a BA in English is required.

    Could anyone help me out here? I really want to get into teaching English abroad, so I would appreciate any answer that can tell me what I should do exactly to become an English teacher. Studying education in uni, getting a BA in English and then working my way through experience or any alternatives?

    Thank you in advance for your response.
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    My mate went teaching English in a school in Thailand with just a TEFL.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    My mate went teaching English in a school in Thailand with just a TEFL.
    Interesting, out of curiosity, will his TEFL be enough to keep him situated as a teacher for as long as wants?
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    (Original post by Fawazknaiver)
    Interesting, out of curiosity, will his TEFL be enough to keep him situated as a teacher for as long as wants?
    It seems so in that particular institution (I thought it was a bit odd myself, but I do know other people that have done the same), though they only stayed for a year.

    In contrast, my cousin taught English in schools in Spain and has a wealth of qualifications, including teaching quals. She did that for many years, so maybe the route with some substantial qualifications makes for more longevity.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    It seems so in that particular institution (I thought it was a bit odd myself, but I do know other people that have done the same), though they only stayed for a year.

    In contrast, my cousin taught English in schools in Spain and has a wealth of qualifications, including teaching quals. She did that for many years, so maybe the route with some substantial qualifications makes for more longevity.
    I see, and I assume the pay was sufficient enough to keep them afloat? Did they go for a masters in any other field at some point in their careers?
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    (Original post by Fawazknaiver)
    I see, and I assume the pay was sufficient enough to keep them afloat? Did they go for a masters in any other field at some point in their careers?
    Cousin did, yes. Pay for TEFL person was, by all accounts, ok. Pay for my cousin was good. She only came back here after retiring.
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    Thank you for your help, this is much appreciated.
    (Original post by gjd800)
    Cousin did, yes. Pay for TEFL person was, by all accounts, ok. Pay for my cousin was good. She only came back here after retiring.
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    Why Japan?

    Do you watch anime or read manga?
 
 
 
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