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Was ICT a good or bad decision in secondary schools? Watch

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    Imagine this scenario. If the government decided in the 1990s that:

    1. Computers are used in primary schools both in traditional subjects and schools also teach ICT as a subject.

    2. Computers are used in secondary schools only in traditional subjects. Secondary schools do not teach ICT. The decision what computer hardware and software is purchased is decided by the heads of individual subjects according to the needs and requirements although in reality they will talk to each other.

    Until Michael Gove came up with Computer Science at GCSE.

    Would this really have been bad? An independent secondary school decided on (2) until it started offering the Computer Science GCSE a few years ago. There was no evidence before then that the kids were less computer literate than those who attended the state schools and studied ICT for 5 years to GCSE level. Despite this there seems to be much reluctance to let go of ICT at secondary school level and a belief that ICT was a good decision.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    Imagine this scenario. If the government decided in the 1990s that:

    1. Computers are used in primary schools both in traditional subjects and schools also teach ICT as a subject.

    2. Computers are used in secondary schools only in traditional subjects. Secondary schools do not teach ICT. The decision what computer hardware and software is purchased is decided by the heads of individual subjects according to the needs and requirements although in reality they will talk to each other.

    Until Michael Gove came up with Computer Science at GCSE.

    Would this really have been bad? An independent secondary school decided on (2) until it started offering the Computer Science GCSE a few years ago. There was no evidence before then that the kids were less computer literate than those who attended the state schools and studied ICT for 5 years to GCSE level. Despite this there seems to be much reluctance to let go of ICT at secondary school level and a belief that ICT was a good decision.
    Not really an ICT fan but to play devils advocate, the independent school kids probably had better access to computers at home and on average more computer literate parents anyway, especially if you're going back to the 90s...

    There had been a lot of noise out of employers about people leaving school who didn't have the skills to operate a PC - badgering the government to put IT literacy on the curriculum seemed better than giving the recruits a short course in microsoft office in the workplace... and if you put something on the national curriculum you've got to have an associated qualification at the end of it so that there is something to be fed into a league table to show whether the school is doing it's job properly.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Not really an ICT fan but to play devils advocate, the independent school kids probably had better access to computers at home and on average more computer literate parents anyway, especially if you're going back to the 90s...
    Unknown. It's quite possible that the independent school kids spend all their time playing sports and musical instruments whilst their parents are snobby technophobes.

    There had been a lot of noise out of employers about people leaving school who didn't have the skills to operate a PC - badgering the government to put IT literacy on the curriculum seemed better than giving the recruits a short course in microsoft office in the workplace...
    Operating a PC in 1990 meant and in-depth knowledge of DOS commands. DOS was still being used by many businesses until the late 1990s.

    Many businesses use bespoke software applications rather than Microsoft Office.

    and if you put something on the national curriculum you've got to have an associated qualification at the end of it so that there is something to be fed into a league table to show whether the school is doing it's job properly.
    That's the problem with the state school setup. GCSEs serve two purposes not one. Independent schools commonly offer extended studies of subjects not part of the curriculum that are not examined.
 
 
 
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