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    I'm at uni. There are good aspects- I like having more independence, little things like being able to do my own food shop, cook my own meals. However there are bad aspects too- mainly my course. I feel bored, uninspired, I'm really not enjoying either the content or the style of learning. It makes me feel so bad that I actually considered having depression but my attitude towards everything else in life and the way I feel when I'm away from uni makes me think I don't actually have depression.

    If something makes you feel bad, the obvious thing you think is not to do it. And I have considered dropping out however I currently don't have an alternative option lined up and waiting.

    The sensible side of me says to finish this degree. I've made a financial commitment, a degree is a great thing to have and I'm nearly halfway through anyway.

    The other half of me thinks how is it considered sensible, when I'm young, healthy, and don't have many responsibilities, to spend my time wishing years of my life away? Sure it's only a couple more years. But I don't want to wake up every day wishing it was over and I could move on with the next chapter in my life. Life's too short.

    I feel stuck between the side of me that's 'sensible' and does the safe thing and the side of me that says I don't have to settle and I should be enjoying myself.

    So to anyone that has any experience with dropping out of uni, how did you know it was the right thing?
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    Reading this, it seems like the only aspect you like is the independence. I do think when you go to university, you do need to enjoy or have interest in the course that you are doing. It is a subject that you will spend the next 3 to 4 years and thousands of pounds studying, you want to make sure it is worth that. Also, if your course is linked to your career aims, you want to do well. Trying to work hard studying something you don't really like makes that a whole lot harder. If you feel this way now, what about next year or the year after?

    If you think there is no way that you will change your mind, I would look for another course or university that will suit you better. Alternatively, you could take some time out and think about what you want to do. To hang on until the end of your degree will be too late. You are best finding a path that you enjoy and something that excites you and challenges you.
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I'm at uni. There are good aspects- I like having more independence, little things like being able to do my own food shop, cook my own meals. However there are bad aspects too- mainly my course. I feel bored, uninspired, I'm really not enjoying either the content or the style of learning. It makes me feel so bad that I actually considered having depression but my attitude towards everything else in life and the way I feel when I'm away from uni makes me think I don't actually have depression.

    If something makes you feel bad, the obvious thing you think is not to do it. And I have considered dropping out however I currently don't have an alternative option lined up and waiting.

    The sensible side of me says to finish this degree. I've made a financial commitment, a degree is a great thing to have and I'm nearly halfway through anyway.

    The other half of me thinks how is it considered sensible, when I'm young, healthy, and don't have many responsibilities, to spend my time wishing years of my life away? Sure it's only a couple more years. But I don't want to wake up every day wishing it was over and I could move on with the next chapter in my life. Life's too short.

    I feel stuck between the side of me that's 'sensible' and does the safe thing and the side of me that says I don't have to settle and I should be enjoying myself.

    So to anyone that has any experience with dropping out of uni, how did you know it was the right thing?
    Just tagging in Sheffield Hallam University and

    (Original post by University Centre Hastings)
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I'm at uni. There are good aspects- I like having more independence, little things like being able to do my own food shop, cook my own meals. However there are bad aspects too- mainly my course. I feel bored, uninspired, I'm really not enjoying either the content or the style of learning. It makes me feel so bad that I actually considered having depression but my attitude towards everything else in life and the way I feel when I'm away from uni makes me think I don't actually have depression.

    If something makes you feel bad, the obvious thing you think is not to do it. And I have considered dropping out however I currently don't have an alternative option lined up and waiting.

    The sensible side of me says to finish this degree. I've made a financial commitment, a degree is a great thing to have and I'm nearly halfway through anyway.

    The other half of me thinks how is it considered sensible, when I'm young, healthy, and don't have many responsibilities, to spend my time wishing years of my life away? Sure it's only a couple more years. But I don't want to wake up every day wishing it was over and I could move on with the next chapter in my life. Life's too short.

    I feel stuck between the side of me that's 'sensible' and does the safe thing and the side of me that says I don't have to settle and I should be enjoying myself.

    So to anyone that has any experience with dropping out of uni, how did you know it was the right thing?
    Hi,

    Sorry to hear things are a bit tough for you at the moment. It's never great when we're in a situation that is making us feel down, and I'm glad to hear the rest of your life feels positive.

    I've definitely felt the way you have at points when I have been studying, and I reckon most people have. It isn't always easy. Sometimes it's worth it to carry on, and sometimes it isn't. I have carried on with courses, but also dropped out of some, so I can see both sides.

    One thing I would say is that you might be able to opt for getting a lower qualification than a degree. For example, you could see if you could use your credits so far to get an HNC or HND. That way, you would leave with something and won't feel like you've wasted money. Perhaps it's worth asking someone where you study if that would be possible?

    If you could have any job right now, what would it be ... ?

    Jordan
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    (Original post by University Centre Hastings)
    Hi,

    Sorry to hear things are a bit tough for you at the moment. It's never great when we're in a situation that is making us feel down, and I'm glad to hear the rest of your life feels positive.

    I've definitely felt the way you have at points when I have been studying, and I reckon most people have. It isn't always easy. Sometimes it's worth it to carry on, and sometimes it isn't. I have carried on with courses, but also dropped out of some, so I can see both sides.

    One thing I would say is that you might be able to opt for getting a lower qualification than a degree. For example, you could see if you could use your credits so far to get an HNC or HND. That way, you would leave with something and won't feel like you've wasted money. Perhaps it's worth asking someone where you study if that would be possible?

    If you could have any job right now, what would it be ... ?

    Jordan
    Thanks for your reply

    Speaking to other people it seems like it's very common to struggle with motivation at uni- I'm just having trouble deciding if it's just a rough patch or if my lack of motivation or being inspired by my course is a sign that I'm not doing the right thing for me.

    If I could have any job I'd love to be an artist/illustrator or park ranger. I have actually applied for a placement at a wildlife reserve so I could potentially take a year out of uni and do some practical work there. I think getting out of a classroom/academic environment could be good for me as I'm a very practical, hands on person rather than an academic or theoretical one
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I'm at uni. There are good aspects- I like having more independence, little things like being able to do my own food shop, cook my own meals. However there are bad aspects too- mainly my course. I feel bored, uninspired, I'm really not enjoying either the content or the style of learning. It makes me feel so bad that I actually considered having depression but my attitude towards everything else in life and the way I feel when I'm away from uni makes me think I don't actually have depression.

    If something makes you feel bad, the obvious thing you think is not to do it. And I have considered dropping out however I currently don't have an alternative option lined up and waiting.

    The sensible side of me says to finish this degree. I've made a financial commitment, a degree is a great thing to have and I'm nearly halfway through anyway.

    The other half of me thinks how is it considered sensible, when I'm young, healthy, and don't have many responsibilities, to spend my time wishing years of my life away? Sure it's only a couple more years. But I don't want to wake up every day wishing it was over and I could move on with the next chapter in my life. Life's too short.

    I feel stuck between the side of me that's 'sensible' and does the safe thing and the side of me that says I don't have to settle and I should be enjoying myself.

    So to anyone that has any experience with dropping out of uni, how did you know it was the right thing?
    Hi!

    What course is it that you currently study?

    One way which might help you to decipher whether you're going through a motivational rough patch or whether you really just don't like your course is to think about when you applied and what's changed. Did you apply because you were interested in and passionate about the subject? Did you apply because you are good at the subject? Did you apply because of career prospects? Or did you apply because you felt that you 'had' to?

    For me, I applied for English language because it was my favourite subject during A-levels. Although some modules at university do make me less motivated than others, overall I still do have a strong interest in the subject as a whole, so I can know when I feel unmotivated that it'll be due to individual modules or other aspects of my life contributing. If you feel as though none of the course is inspiring or interesting you, and that you don't have a passion for the subject itself, this would explain how you're feeling now. Or maybe the course wasn't what you expected it to be?

    Regardless, I think it's great that you've applied for a placement at a wildlife reserve - taking a year out at uni might be what you need to get your passion and focus back! You could even use your day-to-day experiences at the wildlife reserve to create a small portfolio of artwork based on the animals or the landscapes (if that's what you like to draw).

    I think one thing you should definitely do is speak to the university about this. Although it seems a bit daunting to go to them and say you're not enjoying the course, there might be advice that they can give you, and you could even ask about a deferral or switching courses if there are others you feel you'd be interested in. I'm not sure what year you're in, but Student Finance does provide four years of finance to you, so if you are in first year and want to switch courses or even universities, you will be able to get finance for this.

    I hope this helped, good luck with everything

    Ellie
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    (Original post by SHUGURU)
    Hi!

    What course is it that you currently study?

    One way which might help you to decipher whether you're going through a motivational rough patch or whether you really just don't like your course is to think about when you applied and what's changed. Did you apply because you were interested in and passionate about the subject? Did you apply because you are good at the subject? Did you apply because of career prospects? Or did you apply because you felt that you 'had' to?

    For me, I applied for English language because it was my favourite subject during A-levels. Although some modules at university do make me less motivated than others, overall I still do have a strong interest in the subject as a whole, so I can know when I feel unmotivated that it'll be due to individual modules or other aspects of my life contributing. If you feel as though none of the course is inspiring or interesting you, and that you don't have a passion for the subject itself, this would explain how you're feeling now. Or maybe the course wasn't what you expected it to be?

    Regardless, I think it's great that you've applied for a placement at a wildlife reserve - taking a year out at uni might be what you need to get your passion and focus back! You could even use your day-to-day experiences at the wildlife reserve to create a small portfolio of artwork based on the animals or the landscapes (if that's what you like to draw).

    I think one thing you should definitely do is speak to the university about this. Although it seems a bit daunting to go to them and say you're not enjoying the course, there might be advice that they can give you, and you could even ask about a deferral or switching courses if there are others you feel you'd be interested in. I'm not sure what year you're in, but Student Finance does provide four years of finance to you, so if you are in first year and want to switch courses or even universities, you will be able to get finance for this.

    I hope this helped, good luck with everything

    Ellie
    I turned off the notifications for this and forgot about it! But the dilemma still stands.

    I'm studying Biology and I haven't enjoyed it since day 1. Since I started uni it's been a case of 'just give it a few more weeks' and 'just do the assignment/exam, the worst you can do is fail' only I've managed to somehow pass everything (which makes me feel guilty because I know how hard some people work and care about their degree meanwhile I'm doing the bare minimum and still passing). I was there a couple of weeks, and whilst I settled into being away from home and making new friends straight away, I hated uni (the lack of proper routine, the whole student environment, the course content, the learning style, feeling like I wasn't learning or doing anything useful or productive). In first year it felt like leaving was giving up to quickly and not giving it a chance but now I'm wishing I'd listened to that instinct telling me it wasn't right for me

    When I applied for the course it was a case of looking what I was studying at A-level(Chem, Bio and Art) and what I got good grades in. I was good at Biology so I applied for it because I HATED art at school (weird considering it had always been my favourite hobby but I clashed badly with my art teacher and just didn't like the way art was structured at school). I just applied because I didn't know what to do when I left school and uni was sold to me as the 'safe, sensible' option that would open many career paths. Degrees are respected, it seemed logical. I've never had a passion for any academic subject so I just went with what I got good grades in. I didn't really know what to expect from the course to be honest.

    I didn't get that placement but it was good experience for me anyway to apply, go through the interview process and put myself out of my comfort zone.

    I'm in second year at the moment so I'm halfway through my degree almost. I want to cry at the thought of going back after christmas. My tutor is the head of biology and I feel awful going to her and saying 'yeah I lied when I've been telling you everything's great, I actually hate the course and have wanted to leave since I got here....'. I really struggle to go and talk to them because I just feel like I'm moaning. I don't have a back up plan, I can't go and say 'I don't like the course, but I want to do this instead, can you help me set it in motion?'. My tutor can't tell me what to do, all they can help with really is the official processes and helping me do what I've already decided to do.
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I turned off the notifications for this and forgot about it! But the dilemma still stands.

    I'm studying Biology and I haven't enjoyed it since day 1. Since I started uni it's been a case of 'just give it a few more weeks' and 'just do the assignment/exam, the worst you can do is fail' only I've managed to somehow pass everything (which makes me feel guilty because I know how hard some people work and care about their degree meanwhile I'm doing the bare minimum and still passing). I was there a couple of weeks, and whilst I settled into being away from home and making new friends straight away, I hated uni (the lack of proper routine, the whole student environment, the course content, the learning style, feeling like I wasn't learning or doing anything useful or productive). In first year it felt like leaving was giving up to quickly and not giving it a chance but now I'm wishing I'd listened to that instinct telling me it wasn't right for me

    When I applied for the course it was a case of looking what I was studying at A-level(Chem, Bio and Art) and what I got good grades in. I was good at Biology so I applied for it because I HATED art at school (weird considering it had always been my favourite hobby but I clashed badly with my art teacher and just didn't like the way art was structured at school). I just applied because I didn't know what to do when I left school and uni was sold to me as the 'safe, sensible' option that would open many career paths. Degrees are respected, it seemed logical. I've never had a passion for any academic subject so I just went with what I got good grades in. I didn't really know what to expect from the course to be honest.

    I didn't get that placement but it was good experience for me anyway to apply, go through the interview process and put myself out of my comfort zone.

    I'm in second year at the moment so I'm halfway through my degree almost. I want to cry at the thought of going back after christmas. My tutor is the head of biology and I feel awful going to her and saying 'yeah I lied when I've been telling you everything's great, I actually hate the course and have wanted to leave since I got here....'. I really struggle to go and talk to them because I just feel like I'm moaning. I don't have a back up plan, I can't go and say 'I don't like the course, but I want to do this instead, can you help me set it in motion?'. My tutor can't tell me what to do, all they can help with really is the official processes and helping me do what I've already decided to do.
    I am in the same situation at the moment in 2nd year unmotivated and struggling to get any revision done not hopeful about anything atm. There was a thread about this somewhere recently so more people are in this situation than what is thought.

    I also feel like dropping out but have been telling people I'm ok so I guess we are in the same situation.

    I have no idea what I am going to do after university and feel as if it is all a waste of time especially knowing so many graduates are in non graduate jobs.

    I think I would just end up in retail anyway. Currently it is messing with my health as I have been waking up at 4pm and going bed at 3am in a cycle so I have had enough of that as well.

    Do you think you will drop out?
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    (Original post by iodo345)
    I am in the same situation at the moment in 2nd year unmotivated and struggling to get any revision done not hopeful about anything atm. There was a thread about this somewhere recently so more people are in this situation than what is thought.

    I also feel like dropping out but have been telling people I'm ok so I guess we are in the same situation.

    I have no idea what I am going to do after university and feel as if it is all a waste of time especially knowing so many graduates are in non graduate jobs.

    I think I would just end up in retail anyway. Currently it is messing with my health as I have been waking up at 4pm and going bed at 3am in a cycle so I have had enough of that as well.

    Do you think you will drop out?
    I agree with you about the non-gradute jobs. I have three cousins, all with degrees who are 24, 25 and 28 (all graduated when they were 21). Two of them are in retail and one is unemployed. Where's that degree got them that they couldn't have got before? I sometimes think wouldn't it be better to make my own path and go and get experience in the world rather than just spend my time skipping lectures, feeling lost on assignments and wishing I was doing something else. I am worried that I'm suffering from 'the grass is greener' syndrome though, often something else looks great but the reality is that you were better off before.

    I'm sorry it's messing with your health, that's got to make it even worse! At the moment my philosophy is 'the worst they can do is kick me out' so I don't get worked up over assignments etc. But then it makes it feel like a huge waste of my time and money just to be there until I get kicked out when I don't even want to make the most of it

    Honestly I don't know if I will drop out. Sometimes it seem silly to even contemplate it- I'm halfway through the degree, not actually failing yet, have a lot of free time....but then other times it's just soul destroying and I just want nothing more than to leave. I don't have a realistic back up plan so it seems stupid to drop out
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    (Original post by PollyParrot23)
    I agree with you about the non-gradute jobs. I have three cousins, all with degrees who are 24, 25 and 28 (all graduated when they were 21). Two of them are in retail and one is unemployed. Where's that degree got them that they couldn't have got before? I sometimes think wouldn't it be better to make my own path and go and get experience in the world rather than just spend my time skipping lectures, feeling lost on assignments and wishing I was doing something else. I am worried that I'm suffering from 'the grass is greener' syndrome though, often something else looks great but the reality is that you were better off before.

    I'm sorry it's messing with your health, that's got to make it even worse! At the moment my philosophy is 'the worst they can do is kick me out' so I don't get worked up over assignments etc. But then it makes it feel like a huge waste of my time and money just to be there until I get kicked out when I don't even want to make the most of it

    Honestly I don't know if I will drop out. Sometimes it seem silly to even contemplate it- I'm halfway through the degree, not actually failing yet, have a lot of free time....but then other times it's just soul destroying and I just want nothing more than to leave. I don't have a realistic back up plan so it seems stupid to drop out
    May I ask what their degrees were in and whether they actually applied to anything to do with graduate jobs?
    (internships, grad schemes etc)

    I think there is too much pressure to go straight from school most of the people I know at university are only there as it is the next step after sixth form. They don't really know what they will be doing after they graduate and have only chosen a subject they like with no real career aims.

    I too don't have a back up plan but even if I ended up working in retail like your cousins it is not as if the degree has benefitted me but right now I have one of those "keep calm and carry on" posters as my background which reminds me to persevere.

    The only person I know with a job is very wealthy has a 35k job straight after graduation didn't have any part time work,voluntary work, only one internship. The phrase it is not what you know but who you know is very true sadly.
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    (Original post by iodo345)
    May I ask what their degrees were in and whether they actually applied to anything to do with graduate jobs?
    (internships, grad schemes etc)
    One was in Biology like me, the other was in Finance and Accounting and I can't actually remember what the third was in but I think it was a 'less academic' subject so to speak.

    The biology and accounting ones both applied for graduate schemes, one didn't get on so took a retail job to fill the time (and three years later is still there) and the other did but hated it so much he dropped out, decided finance wasn't for him and is now unemployed has spent the last few months looking for work
 
 
 
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