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opinions : do you think uni is worth £9000 a year? Watch

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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    I actually edit it before you responded.

    To be honest in don’t think you really understand the points I’m making, which is fine, but it makes responding a bit pointless for me.
    No, I understand what you mean. Doesn’t mean I have to agree with it.

    I understand that you have to have a brilliant track record to attend Oxbridge, that certainly looks good in your favour.

    As I said, your degree comes from you. Your classification (first, 2:1 etc) does as well. You aren’t measured in comparison to those around you.

    If anything, getting a 2:2 from Cambridge looks worse on you. You didn’t measure up to your peers. Whereas someone from a different RG Uni exceeded their peers.

    Your point about grades being taken in context would only really be valid if you exceeded your peers, or you were measured against them. Neither is the case for someone from a 2:2 from Oxbridge.
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    (Original post by FloralHybrid)
    As I said, your degree comes from you. Your classification (first, 2:1 etc) does as well. You aren’t measured in comparison to those around you.
    Depends on the course. For example in our first and second year exams (NatSci, Cambridge) marks are scaled so that a fixed percentage of the cohort gets each grade irregardless of how well or badly people do overall.
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    (Original post by Forecast)
    Depends on the course. For example in our first and second year exams (NatSci, Cambridge) marks are scaled so that a fixed percentage of the cohort gets each grade.
    Ah, so it’s not always fixed percentages. You can be measured against your peers. Interesting.
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    (Original post by FloralHybrid)
    Ah, so it’s not always fixed percentages. You can be measured against your peers. Interesting.
    It depends on the uni though. At imperial it's only a top percentage which get whatever class of degree, but at others, like UCL it's a fixed percentage of achievement (i.e. one year if everyone is great there may only be 2:1s and above).
    But I don't really get the whole measuring against peers thing personally as especially by the time you get to uni there's such a variation in age and backgrounds that each cohort can be quite different.
    I think my year's cohort at UCL aren't the brightest because last year there was a drop in applicants for chemistry, so lots of people have got in despite missing their offers (but equally that could be because the new a-levels were a mess).
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    (Original post by GovernmentEarner)
    Think about it logically though. It’s relative to who you’re being compared with.

    In a university of extremely intelligent people it is going to require much more work to be in the top 20% than it is in a university of fairly intelligent people.

    I don’t really get what you mean when you say ‘they would just go somwhere else’. Oxbridge students are usually their because they’d love their subject and want to do it in the best environment possible, not for a grade. Also I’m pretty sure Oxbridhe students know how to effectively revise, most have been getting top grades for years.

    The only time these people were compared on an equal level was at A Level and the Oxbridge student likely got 2/3A* while the Mid Russell Group ABB-AAA.

    So the 2:2 Oxbridge student likely works harder, and would get a first at a university where people worked less than them. However they’re surrounded by people even more determined.

    It’s a bit like big fish little fish theory.
    That’s why IMO grades should be considered in the context of the uni.
    The general comparison I've always heard was that 2:1 from Oxbridge ~ comparable to a first at another Russel group. Not 2:2.
    Also you've got to remember there are plenty of people who get Oxbridge offers and just miss them, or people who haven't had the right teaching etc so underperform at A-Level but go on to get firsts at degree level. Oxbridge does not necessarily mean the most intelligent, just that at that point in time these particular students were performing best. A lot of students are hot-housed into getting to Oxbridge, and then collapse when they haven't got parental pressure etc (I've witnessed this). So although the majority of the cohort are very intelligent etc, that does not mean that all are, and that all will work hard (I know ppl there who literally just keep their grades at a pass and party on the rest of the time). It equally does not mean that all the intelligent people are at Oxbridge. Plenty of high-achieving people I've known didn't apply there because they felt it was posh and snobbish there, or because they felt it was too burdened by tradition. Or their exams went badly due to mental health issues etc, and now they're thriving at unis where they actually have support in place for mental health issues.

    It is a highly selective institution so I agree there is some discrepancy, but not as much as a 2:2 being equivalent to a first.
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    (Original post by StealingThunder)
    It depends on the uni though. At imperial it's only a top percentage which get whatever class of degree, but at others, like UCL it's a fixed percentage of achievement (i.e. one year if everyone is great there may only be 2:1s and above).
    But I don't really get the whole measuring against peers thing personally as especially by the time you get to uni there's such a variation in age and backgrounds that each cohort can be quite different.
    I think my year's cohort at UCL aren't the brightest because last year there was a drop in applicants for chemistry, so lots of people have got in despite missing their offers (but equally that could be because the new a-levels were a mess).
    I completely agree. I think it should be a fixed percentage and not a case of “The top 10% of you will be given a first”

    Because as you say, mixed ability.
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    yes how else can I become a doctor..
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    It's a personal decision. I do not think your average non-vocational degree from a Russell Group/1994 Group uni is worth 9k a year. There's only four or five unis in the country that I'd be prepared to spend 9k a year on. Not because those unis are intrinsically better, they probably aren't, but because (rightly or wrongly) they have added cachet.
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    I think this is heavily debated and controversial. Personally, I'd say yes it is worth the money if you end up going to a top university for your course that you want to study. I've applied to study International Business/Economics and I want to go to university. For subjects like it would depend on what you'd want to go into further, e.g. medicine, dentistry, etc... There are some courses where you may not really need a degree to get into what you want to do in the future, especially now that apprenticeships have become more available, and some companies offer degree apprenticeships where you earn and learn whilst they pay for your education and what not - yet these types of apprenticeships are very competitive. Didn't really want to use the phrase "good university" because good can be defined in many ways for different people. This is just my two cents though. Either way, I don't think anyone wants to pay £9000-£9250 each year for however long your course is.
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    No. Not at all. Uni should cost different amounts regarding the course because different courses are not worth the same. I for example do Creative Writing and Media Studies joint honours. My current time table is 8 hours of lectures or seminars a week. Most of these just consist of the lecturer reading off the slide which then gets put on blackboard. I'm paying 9k a year for this ****. My friend on the other hand does radiology. She gets lab access and does a lot of practical based work with equipment etc. That's worth 9k a year. I should not be paying the same as someone doing a science or medicine degree because I get far less out of this than they do. I don't see how it's justified what I pay in regards to what I actually get given
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    (Original post by Killgrave)
    I certainly think it's "worth" 9k a year.but I think certain subjects and degrees should be 100% funded by tax payers and corporations.
    Like which ones?
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    Nursing, Paramedic science, Social work, anything in teaching....
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    (Original post by Killgrave)
    Nursing, Paramedic science, Social work, anything in teaching....
    What if they then don't use their degree in the future? Or too many people apply despite not wanting to do it
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    What subject are you going to study because tbh it really depends on that, if it's something like media studies I'd say getting experience with a firm doing something in the area you're interested in would be more useful
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      Nope , not worth it all but like its more that you have to do it now a days :cry:
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      (Original post by rleah1998)
      What if they then don't use their degree in the future? Or too many people apply despite not wanting to do it
      I don't have all of the answers, however I'm sure those qualified in government can find the solutions to situations like your examples.

      My post was to highlight the difference in importance to society and the wider community of a teaching degree compared to say a media studies degree.
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      Yes. Cheaper than my public school education.

      Although it's not really 9k is it. It's practically free unless you are brain dead and can't land a decent job.
     
     
     
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