Turn on thread page Beta

when do psychiatrists begin earning a salary? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    hiya,

    i'm in yr 11, and, for a while now, i have been really drawn towards going down the psychiatry route- i have suffered with mental health issues in the past couple of years, and it has really sparked my interest in psychiatry; i want to help people who are suffering, as i have been through it myself.

    however, i have looked in to the process of becoming a psychiatrist, and it takes around 13 years to become fully qualified, which means a lot of money must be spent on the process of becoming a psychiatrist, and that scares me, as i am worried about being in debt for the rest of my life.

    so, my question is: when do psychiatrists begin earning a salary? is it after the whole 13 years, or earlier?
    (note: i'm not in for the money in the long run, i would just like to know whether i'll be in debt for the rest of my life in order pursue my dream).

    thank you so much for any replies xx
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Psychiatrists are doctors. If you want to be a doctor you must study for 2 years for your A-levels and then for 5 years at university, then once a junior doctor you will get paid. You will have 2 foundation years after university, after that you can choose and study for your specialisation e.g. psychiatry.

    There are other ways to help those with mental health disorders such as clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is very competitive as well, where you must study for 3 years for psychology degree (2:1 or higher is very desirable), and study for a postgraduate qualification to become a clinical psychologist, usually a PhD. In the NHS you get paid as a trainee clinical psychologist while studying for your postgraduate qualification.

    I hope this helps.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    When specialising in psychiatry, you are assigned a work placement at a hospital and during your training you are paid. So you won't be in debt 'cause you earn while you work and obviously like always, pay back your degree as you continue to work after fully qualifying.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    You won't be in debt but you'll basically be broke 24/7
    (Original post by Vanilla Twilight)
    When specialising in psychiatry, you are assigned a work placement at a hospital and during your training you are paid. So you won't be in debt 'cause you earn while you work and obviously like always, pay back your degree as you continue to work after fully qualifying.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saharan_skies)
    You won't be in debt but you'll basically be broke 24/7
    That's the same with any degree though. People spend decades paying back degree loans.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by lanababe78)
    hiya,

    i'm in yr 11, and, for a while now, i have been really drawn towards going down the psychiatry route- i have suffered with mental health issues in the past couple of years, and it has really sparked my interest in psychiatry; i want to help people who are suffering, as i have been through it myself.

    however, i have looked in to the process of becoming a psychiatrist, and it takes around 13 years to become fully qualified, which means a lot of money must be spent on the process of becoming a psychiatrist, and that scares me, as i am worried about being in debt for the rest of my life.

    so, my question is: when do psychiatrists begin earning a salary? is it after the whole 13 years, or earlier?
    (note: i'm not in for the money in the long run, i would just like to know whether i'll be in debt for the rest of my life in order pursue my dream).

    thank you so much for any replies xx
    22sgw is correct.

    I do neurology, so that's slightly less psychiatry than psychiatry proper.

    Medical school is 5 years (or 6 depending on where you study), the last year is paid for by NHS bursary (still - under current plans). Once you graduate, when you are still in Foundation Training with no specialty, you will be paid around £26k/year. This will go up each year, as long as you pass your year (and exams as appropriate).

    You will need to apply for Core Psychiatry Training at the middle of FY2. Then re-apply for your sub-specialty at ST2 (2 years after FY2). Once you passed ST7, you will get your "Certificate of Completion of Training" and can apply to be a consultant, when you will earn (currently) ~ £76k/year.

    However you will be in debt for a while, when you are training. You do not need to repay the whole of your monthly salary though so you should be able to live fairly comfortable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ecolier)
    22sgw is correct.

    I do neurology, so that's slightly less psychiatry than psychiatry proper.

    Medical school is 5 years (or 6 depending on where you study), the last year is paid for by NHS bursary (still - under current plans). Once you graduate, when you are still in Foundation Training with no specialty, you will be paid around £26k/year. This will go up each year, as long as you pass your year (and exams as appropriate).

    You will need to apply for Core Psychiatry Training at the middle of FY2. Then re-apply for your sub-specialty at ST2 (2 years after FY2). Once you passed ST7, you will get your "Certificate of Completion of Training" and can apply to be a consultant, when you will earn (currently) ~ £76k/year.

    However you will be in debt for a while, when you are training. You do not need to repay the whole of your monthly salary though so you should be able to live fairly comfortable.
    thank you so much for such a detailed response- it is much appreciated! just one question: when in debt whilst training, is is debt from university fees (medical school is the same as medicine in university, right?). thank you so much, once again x
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 22sgw)
    Psychiatrists are doctors. If you want to be a doctor you must study for 2 years for your A-levels and then for 5 years at university, then once a junior doctor you will get paid. You will have 2 foundation years after university, after that you can choose and study for your specialisation e.g. psychiatry.

    There are other ways to help those with mental health disorders such as clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is very competitive as well, where you must study for 3 years for psychology degree (2:1 or higher is very desirable), and study for a postgraduate qualification to become a clinical psychologist, usually a PhD. In the NHS you get paid as a trainee clinical psychologist while studying for your postgraduate qualification.

    I hope this helps.
    thank you so much for such an informed, detailed response! you have really helped! x
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by lanababe78)
    thank you so much for such a detailed response- it is much appreciated! just one question: when in debt whilst training, is is debt from university fees (medical school is the same as medicine in university, right?). thank you so much, once again x
    Yes, med school is part of the University and the tuition fees will be £9250/year under current plans. You may want to borrow more though for other expenses so the debt will be higher than just the fees.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ecolier)
    Yes, med school is part of the University and the tuition fees will be £9250/year under current plans. You may want to borrow more though for other expenses so the debt will be higher than just the fees.
    oh, right, thank you so much! x
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

2,917

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 22 Aug '18
  3. University of Buckingham
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.