P0phead
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Is there a best Conservatoire or are they all evenly matched?

Does going to a prestigious College such as Royal Academy of Music or Royal College of Music actually have any added benefit to ones career?
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Djerun
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(Original post by P0phead)
Is there a best Conservatoire or are they all evenly matched?

Does going to a prestigious College such as Royal Academy of Music or Royal College of Music actually have any added benefit to ones career?
Other than prestige and location? No. You'll get good teachers, but you'll get some of the same teachers in conservatoires such as the RNCM and Trinity Laban. I'm considering accepting my offer for the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and the course allows me to be flexible, despite having the performing capability to be able to get into the RCM. RCS is still prestigious however, being ranked joint 3rd in the world with RAM. I would personally choose a less prestigious conservatoire such as Trinity Laban over RCM as the course allows me to explore different areas of music, as opposed to being more one directional in a conservatoire like RCM, something that the contemporary music industry does not want you to be.
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TrinityLaban
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(Original post by P0phead)
Is there a best Conservatoire or are they all evenly matched?

Does going to a prestigious College such as Royal Academy of Music or Royal College of Music actually have any added benefit to ones career?
Hey P0phead,

Thanks for your post - good question!

Generally speaking, conservatoires offer vocational professional training in music/dance/drama. Academic study is part of the degree programme too (e.g. history, criticism, analysis...), but this is to underpin the performance aspect rather than the main focus.

If you want to become a professional musician then a conservatoire could be a good option for you. But if you'd prefer to study music more broadly in an academic context, then I would say that a university is your best bet.

Hope that helps!

Claire
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HKP24
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(Original post by TrinityLaban)
Hey P0phead,

Thanks for your post - good question!

Generally speaking, conservatoires offer vocational professional training in music/dance/drama. Academic study is part of the degree programme too (e.g. history, criticism, analysis...), but this is to underpin the performance aspect rather than the main focus.

If you want to become a professional musician then a conservatoire could be a good option for you. But if you'd prefer to study music more broadly in an academic context, then I would say that a university is your best bet.

Hope that helps!

Claire
Hey,
I'm thinking of applying to Trinity Laban as one of my conservatoires for an undergraduate course, piano being my principal study.
How hard is it to pass the auditions?

Thanks
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TrinityLaban
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(Original post by HKP24)
Hey,
I'm thinking of applying to Trinity Laban as one of my conservatoires for an undergraduate course, piano being my principal study.
How hard is it to pass the auditions?

Thanks
Hi HKP24,

It's great that you are considering us and we hope to meet you at an audition soon!

Generally speaking, applicants need to be at grade 8 standard or equivalent (although you don't necessarily need the official certification). It is a competitive process, but the number one thing we are looking for is potential.

Despite it being competitive, most people that audition tell us that they really enjoy the day. The audition is a two-way process - you will also get plenty of opportunity to chat with current students and staff so that you find out whether TL is a good fit for you. The environment here is very friendly and we want our audition process to reflect that.

I hope that helps. If you have anymore questions let me know - I'm happy to help .

Claire
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HKP24
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(Original post by TrinityLaban)
Hi HKP24,

It's great that you are considering us and we hope to meet you at an audition soon!

Generally speaking, applicants need to be at grade 8 standard or equivalent (although you don't necessarily need the official certification). It is a competitive process, but the number one thing we are looking for is potential.

Despite it being competitive, most people that audition tell us that they really enjoy the day. The audition is a two-way process - you will also get plenty of opportunity to chat with current students and staff so that you find out whether TL is a good fit for you. The environment here is very friendly and we want our audition process to reflect that.

I hope that helps. If you have anymore questions let me know - I'm happy to help .

Claire
Hey, I had another question regarding Trinity

What factors do you base your decisions on during the time of an audition.
Apart from the fact that the applicant has to be Grade 8 standard.
For example, If a person makes a unintentional mistake at an audition but still carries on playing to complete the piece of music, are they immediately disregarded and declined.
How do you choose your students?
Many Thanks
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TrinityLaban
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(Original post by HKP24)
Hey, I had another question regarding Trinity

What factors do you base your decisions on during the time of an audition.
Apart from the fact that the applicant has to be Grade 8 standard.
For example, If a person makes a unintentional mistake at an audition but still carries on playing to complete the piece of music, are they immediately disregarded and declined.
How do you choose your students?
Many Thanks
Hi HKP24,

Applicants who make a mistake won't automatically be disregarded - this can happen to even the most experienced musicians. The audition isn't about delivering the perfect performance - the main things we are looking for is passion and potential so these are the qualities you need to demonstrate.

Hope that helps!

Claire
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e^iπ
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Jacob Reese-Mogg by a country mile
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HKP24
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(Original post by TrinityLaban)
Hi HKP24,

Applicants who make a mistake won't automatically be disregarded - this can happen to even the most experienced musicians. The audition isn't about delivering the perfect performance - the main things we are looking for is passion and potential so these are the qualities you need to demonstrate.

Hope that helps!

Claire
Thank you so much!
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michielrene
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Yes, I completely agree with this......my teacher teaches at both RCM and Trinity Laban, as other teachers do too. She told me herself that the level of teaching is the same. Therefore, I have chosen Trinity Laban over RCM, because it’s more flexible in its programmes and offers part-time studies as well. Also, the location in Greenwich is just too stunning for speech. Please do check it out, if you have a chance....... And finally, I spoke to a couple of students at Trinity Laban, who had previously studied at RCM.......they told me they were happier at Trinity Laban for its relaxed atmosphere. So in other words, just follow your intuition......it’s most important that you feel comfortable in your daily surroundings.
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Issyhp11
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(Original post by Djerun)
Other than prestige and location? No. You'll get good teachers, but you'll get some of the same teachers in conservatoires such as the RNCM and Trinity Laban. I'm considering accepting my offer for the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and the course allows me to be flexible, despite having the performing capability to be able to get into the RCM. RCS is still prestigious however, being ranked joint 3rd in the world with RAM. I would personally choose a less prestigious conservatoire such as Trinity Laban over RCM as the course allows me to explore different areas of music, as opposed to being more one directional in a conservatoire like RCM, something that the contemporary music industry does not want you to be.
I disagree that the RCM is ‘one directional’. The depth of the course allows you to explore whichever musical genres/direction you feel suit you best. Of course the focus is on classical music however the contemporary side of things are of signifance- the entire BMus 1 Historical studies course is based on contemporary music post 1945..... I think it is also important to consider the opportunities that London itself presents; the performance opportunities are second to none, and by this I’m referring to events organised outside of the RCM as well as internal concerts. Of course this is only my opinion but I genuinely do believe that the RCM is the leading conservatoire in terms of setting you up for a career in music, whatever that may entail.
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JPSmusic
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Attending a music college is a good career choice if you can get in (bear in mind that it can be very competitive). There are approx ten around the UK. They all tend to have excellent teachers who will train you to a very high standard by the time you finish your course. There are 5 that I know of in London (rcm, ram, trinity, guildhall and lcm (lcm is in Ealing), and several others around the country. The ones in London (except guildhall) are also part of the main UKExamining bodies (grades, diplomas).It depends exactly what area of music you are into, but probably best to see what courses they offer and audition for a few. Online ranking websites for UK music courses/colleges are very varied indeed. The rcm and ram are usually the most prestigious but bizarrely they are sometimes put further down the list on some website rankings and trinity and lcm get hugely varied reviews so I wouldn't take online ranking too seriously. Probably best go online to their websites and see what courses are on offer.
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scottish1980
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I am having a similar dilemma. I have been offered a place at Trinity Laban and Leeds College of Music. The later is closer to home and I know my tutor. The former is London based, which I've always felt would give me access to more opportunities and exposure to better teaching. I will be studying Classical vocal studies.

Does anyone have any experience or top tips on which is best for my subject?
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