Someone8668
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
helllllp. ahhhhhhhh. soooo confusing. isnt a mole a animal that digs underground lol! any of u got any explanation of what this is in gcse chemistry or any web links?
0
reply
amberfox264
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
A mole is a certain number of particles.

A dozen particles would be 12 particles.

A couple of particles would be 2 particles

A mole of particles would be 6.022 x 10^23 particles.

Just like dozen or couple, it is a shorter way of specifying the number of particles in a substance.
1
reply
usernamexela
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Someone8668)
helllllp. ahhhhhhhh. soooo confusing. isnt a mole a animal that digs underground lol! any of u got any explanation of what this is in gcse chemistry or any web links?
A mole is a unit of measurement for the amount of a substance. It's based off avagadro's constant - 6.02214086 × 10^23 mol-1 - which is the number of atoms/molecules in a mole of a substance.
1
reply
amberfox264
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
So a mole of any element has exactly 6.022 x 10^23 particles in.
0
reply
Someone8668
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by amberfox264)
A mole is a certain number of particles.

A dozen particles would be 12 particles.

A couple of particles would be 2 particles

A mole of particles would be 6.022 x 10^23 particles.

Just like dozen or couple, it is a shorter way of specifying the number of particles in a substance.
thanks for the formula and for telling me bout it. sorta understand it know
0
reply
3121
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
Isn't Moles a popular dish in france? they were selling it everywhere when i went
1
reply
_RobbieL_
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
A mole is just an amount of things. Just like you can get a dozen of something (primarily eggs), that means you can get 12 specifically. Therefore dozen = 12 as you know.

A mole is just an amount of things used to describe the amount of atoms, molecules, or particles found in a certain mass of something. 1 Mole of any substance, no matter what it is, contains 6.02x10^23 atoms/molecules/particles. Therefore you can have a mole of carbon, or a mole of oxygen, or a mole of rubidium, and each amount will have the same amount of "stuff".

However, different atoms and molecules have different relative molecular masses, as you know. E.g: Carbon is 12.0, Oxygen is 16.0, Chlorine is 35.5 and so on.

The rule you need to remember is that 1 mole of any "thing" will have the same mass as it's Mr (relative molecular mass) in grams. So, one mole of carbon has a mass of 12g. You can use this fact to find out the mass of any number of moles of different species.

For example, if you have 0.25 moles of Fe (Iron) and you want to know it's mass, you simply work it out from the fact 1 mole of Iron = 55.8g of Iron (seeing as Mr of Iron = 55.8) **forgive me if I'm wrong, I am trying to remember Mr numbers off the top of my head, but the idea I am giving to you still bears the same weight. So 0.25 moles of Fe has a mass of (55.8 * 0.25) = 13.95g.

However, there is a catch which examiners will expect you to know.

One mole of most gases which don't have a full outer shell is not the same in grams as their Mr. This is because in their base state most gases form molecular compounds. For example, Oxygen is O2, Chlorine is Cl2 etc etc. This means that the Mr of Oxygen in its most basic form is not actually 16, but 32 (2 * 16), and therefore one mole of oxygen = 32g in this scenario.

That's all I think you need to understand at a GCSE level, I might be mistaken but you should get the gist of it anyway. Good luck learning!
1
reply
Someone8668
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by usernamexela)
A mole is a unit of measurement for the amount of a substance. It's based off avagadro's constant - 6.02214086 × 10^23 mol-1 - which is the number of atoms/molecules in a mole of a substance.
thanks
0
reply
Someone8668
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by Zxyn)
Isn't Moles a popular dish in france? they were selling it everywhere when i went
lol
0
reply
Someone8668
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by _RobbieL_)
A mole is just an amount of things. Just like you can get a dozen of something (primarily eggs), that means you can get 12 specifically. Therefore dozen = 12 as you know.

A mole is just an amount of things used to describe the amount of atoms, molecules, or particles found in a certain mass of something. 1 Mole of any substance, no matter what it is, contains 6.02x10^23 atoms/molecules/particles. Therefore you can have a mole of carbon, or a mole of oxygen, or a mole of rubidium, and each amount will have the same amount of "stuff".

However, different atoms and molecules have different relative molecular masses, as you know. E.g: Carbon is 12.0, Oxygen is 16.0, Chlorine is 35.5 and so on.

The rule you need to remember is that 1 mole of any "thing" will have the same mass as it's Mr (relative molecular mass) in grams. So, one mole of carbon has a mass of 12g. You can use this fact to find out the mass of any number of moles of different species.

For example, if you have 0.25 moles of Fe (Iron) and you want to know it's mass, you simply work it out from the fact 1 mole of Iron = 55.8g of Iron (seeing as Mr of Iron = 55.8) **forgive me if I'm wrong, I am trying to remember Mr numbers off the top of my head, but the idea I am giving to you still bears the same weight. So 0.25 moles of Fe has a mass of (55.8 * 0.25) = 13.95g.

However, there is a catch which examiners will expect you to know.

One mole of most gases which don't have a full outer shell is not the same in grams as their Mr. This is because in their base state most gases form molecular compounds. For example, Oxygen is O2, Chlorine is Cl2 etc etc. This means that the Mr of Oxygen in its most basic form is not actually 16, but 32 (2 * 16), and therefore one mole of oxygen = 32g in this scenario.

That's all I think you need to understand at a GCSE level, I might be mistaken but you should get the gist of it anyway. Good luck learning!
yesss, thanks. understand it now. no need to panic for my upcoming chemistry exam now
0
reply
amberfox264
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
(Original post by Someone8668)
thanks for the formula and for telling me bout it. sorta understand it know
That's ok! No one understood it when we first got taught it, I had to go over it a few times until I found a video that explained it like this!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (637)
33.6%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (798)
42.09%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (376)
19.83%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (85)
4.48%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed