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    Hi. I'm at my as levels...the level of learning is much higher. I know I need to dedicate myself to revising...but after short span of time of reading the text, I get distracted into binge reading a novel. It's more like an addiction. And I don't know how to put an end to it...Any help, suggestions, solutions would be really appreciated!
    • #2
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    I had the same issue throughout my time in school although it wasn't just fictitious novels but non-fiction topics on a variety of subject matters.

    I'm reminded of the quote by George Bernard Shaw:

    “From a very early age, I've had to interrupt my education to go to school.”

    Now, my advice is to outline how much time you feel you need to dedicate to each subject. They say about 500 hours of study at A level to get the top grades, so if you are doing 3 and you 40 weeks and three subjects that 1500 hours. Now say you spend 6 hours a week on each subject at school, that's already 180 (rough estimate of 30 * 6) so you have 180 for each subject and now the extra 320 has to come in your own time. 320 / 40 means 8 hours a week for each subject, let's say you can't study on weekends, that means dedicate 2 hours a night to revision for each subject four times a week. Which means it's 4-6 hours a night. Get that done and then you can fit in 1-3 hours of reading after depending on what other responsibilities you have. Ultimately, you get that time-management is paramount for A levels. It's best to revise more at first and have a surplus of revision in the first few months then to have not revised enough when your time is limited in the last few months prior to your exam.
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    (Original post by FriendlyPenguin)
    lol

    I got addicted to reading novels during my AS levels too.

    Isaac Asimov, Robert Harris, Ray Bradbury, etc.

    The only way I put an end to it was to find something more interesting to do. That being maths olympiads and STEP.
    Thanks! Also thanks for mentioning the authors!(probably I'll check their stuff! )unfortunately these novels are the most interesting things I've got so far... I wonder what's STEP though...
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I had the same issue throughout my time in school although it wasn't just fictitious novels but non-fiction topics on a variety of subject matters.

    I'm reminded of the quote by George Bernard Shaw:

    “From a very early age, I've had to interrupt my education to go to school.”

    Now, my advice is to outline how much time you feel you need to dedicate to each subject. They say about 500 hours of study at A level to get the top grades, so if you are doing 3 and you 40 weeks and three subjects that 1500 hours. Now say you spend 6 hours a week on each subject at school, that's already 180 (rough estimate of 30 * 6) so you have 180 for each subject and now the extra 320 has to come in your own time. 320 / 40 means 8 hours a week for each subject, let's say you can't study on weekends, that means dedicate 2 hours a night to revision for each subject four times a week. Which means it's 4-6 hours a night. Get that done and then you can fit in 1-3 hours of reading after depending on what other responsibilities you have. Ultimately, you get that time-management is paramount for A levels. It's best to revise more at first and have a surplus of revision in the first few months then to have not revised enough when your time is limited in the last few months prior to your exam.

    Wow! I'm really grateful for the meticulously planned planner! So the bottom line is I've got to keep 2 hrs for each subject, possibly 5 days... and I would need to remind myself I've got 1-3 hrs of reading on weekend as in a reward aye? Thanks for the help!
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    how does one develop this addiction again after losing it
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    (Original post by FriendlyPenguin)
    STEP is like hardcore illegal drugs, except better.


    .
    I see. Well, that option isn't applicable for though...thanks btw...is there anything else, you would like to recommend?
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    (Original post by Mystery.)
    how does one develop this addiction again after losing it
    You start reading ... 'force' yourself to read something interesting.
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    (Original post by Mystery.)
    how does one develop this addiction again after losing it
    Well, in my case I developed again coz....it's the most interesting activity I could be doing. Besides, it kind of provides a relaxing time for me... so yeah... did you have the addiction too?
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    (Original post by FriendlyPenguin)
    Aldous Huxley, Douglas Adams, Michael Chrichton, Arthur C Clarke, and then Isaac Asimov again because his are that good.
    Hehe...You're being sarcastic right? I was asking advice on "how to get me away from reading novels" Thanks for ya help tho!
 
 
 
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