'How does your disability affect your ability to study'

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MoominMaiden
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Hi

Both the university and a doctor are asking me to summarise ''How does your disability affect your ability to study''

I have
Bipolar
Borderline Personality Disorder
Dyslexia

Are there any examples out there on the web of how study is affected by dyslexia and mental health problems?

I know it can vary from person to person, but I don't know where to start!

Thanks

MM
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ParadoxSocks
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(Original post by MoominMaiden)
Hi

Both the university and a doctor are asking me to summarise ''How does your disability affect your ability to study''

I have
Bipolar
Borderline Personality Disorder
Dyslexia

Are there any examples out there on the web of how study is affected by dyslexia and mental health problems?

I know it can vary from person to person, but I don't know where to start!

Thanks

MM
For my bipolar I had to say how a depressed, manic and mixed episode would affect my learning, attendance and how I study. For example, during the start of manic episodes I can agree to do too much so I had a support worker who controlled everything. Think of your worst day and work through why your life is a little harder because of your disabilities.
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by MoominMaiden)
Hi

Both the university and a doctor are asking me to summarise ''How does your disability affect your ability to study''

I have
Bipolar
Borderline Personality Disorder
Dyslexia

Are there any examples out there on the web of how study is affected by dyslexia and mental health problems?

I know it can vary from person to person, but I don't know where to start!

Thanks

MM
Are dyslexia, BPD and Bipolar considered disabilities?

Conditions, most definitely. I’m, not sure about disabilities though.
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Rigel
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
Are dyslexia, BPD and Bipolar considered disabilities?

Conditions, most definitely. I’m, not sure about disabilities though.
Google's definition of a disability: "a physical or mental condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities."

Yes they are disabilities.
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MoominMaiden
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ok conditions/disabilities

I suppose my Bipolar and BPD conditions are persistent, pervasive and problematic, and I was receiving ESA until returning to work recently, and now applying for PIP (like that will ever be granted under the current regime)

This is to aid my application of 'Disabled' students allowance after all.
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Claire461
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
Are dyslexia, BPD and Bipolar considered disabilities?

Conditions, most definitely. I’m, not sure about disabilities though.
They are considered disabilities in terms of study.
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Tiger Rag
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Think of everything related to study. So it's not just sitting there and reading your textbook and making notes. Do you need any exam arrangements, such as modified exam papers, extra time to read, rest breaks, a smaller room, etc?
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bones-mccoy
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My mental health problems meant that I performed poorly in some of my exams at university and I had to fill out countless extenuating circumstances forms. You have to be specific and address how your illnesses have affected your ability to study rather than talk about general statistics. For example, I had little motivation to revise and struggled to concentrate in lectures. My social anxiety meant I found it extremely difficult to leave the house and engage with public transport, I also used to dissociate so could easily spend half an exam feeling like I was outside my body which obviously meant I didn't do very well. I had trouble sleeping so had no energy to revise or go to lectures.

You just need to relate the symptoms of your illnesses to how they negatively affect your work.
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04MR17
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
Are dyslexia, BPD and Bipolar considered disabilities?

Conditions, most definitely. I’m, not sure about disabilities though.
(Original post by Rigel)
Google's definition of a disability: "a physical or mental condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities."

Yes they are disabilities.
"Long term, significant impact on day-to-day activities."

That is how DSA define disability, and therefore I assume that would be how universities would consider it too.

By significant, they say not-trivial.
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by 04MR17)
"Long term, significant impact on day-to-day activities."

That is how DSA define disability, and therefore I assume that would be how universities would consider it too.

By significant, they say not-trivial.
Ahh, okay. Thank you!

Although I’m curious to see how drastically that then varies from person to person. By that logic, I could argue my asthma is a disability to my studies as I spend most of winter coughing through attempting to work, and the night coughing so I struggle sleeping.

(I don’t mean at all to belittle the issues the OP has in any way, I just find it interesting how definitions can be twisted I suppose)
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04MR17
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
Ahh, okay. Thank you!

Although I’m curious to see how drastically that then varies from person to person. By that logic, I could argue my asthma is a disability to my studies as I spend most of winter coughing through attempting to work, and the night coughing so I struggle sleeping.

(I don’t mean at all to belittle the issues the OP has in any way, I just find it interesting how definitions can be twisted I suppose)
That might be a difficult one to argue to be honest.
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by 04MR17)
That might be a difficult one to argue to be honest.
I imagine it would also.

However, it affects me a lot more than my bipolar does. Although I’m fortunate in the sense that my bipolar is mild and has yet to implicate my studies in anyway.

Anywho. Good luck to the OP in hopefully getting your allowance!
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by MoominMaiden)
Hi

Both the university and a doctor are asking me to summarise ''How does your disability affect your ability to study''

I have
Bipolar
Borderline Personality Disorder
Dyslexia

Are there any examples out there on the web of how study is affected by dyslexia and mental health problems?

I know it can vary from person to person, but I don't know where to start!

Thanks

MM
Are you on any medication for the bipolar? antipsychotics can cause problems with concentration and motivation. I don't know if bipolar itself also causes this, almost certainly the depression side of things, and with mania you're probably going to find it difficult to focus on your work too. The medication can make you very tired so early morning exams or classes can be a big problem. I know some people with bipolar might have hallucinations during a manic episode so it might be hard for you to take notes in class. you might find it difficult to organize yourself (lack of motivation/confusing thoughts/difficulty thinking) and your work/deadlines. I don't know....do you have any kind of anxiety? maybe feeling bad in exams being in a big room around a lot of other people or having difficulty concentrating then, again, medication or the bipolar/hallucinations. :beard: just a few ideas off the top of my head. Hope this helps!
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Pathway
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I got a lot of different things to help me with studying, the main things that made the most difference though were my disability support worker and my specialist MH mentor (only had my specialist MH mentor in my final year though). But having said that my initial Needs Assessment was based purely on my physical issues as I had no MH diagnoses at the time because I hadn't spoken to anyone about my MH issues. Not that it mattered, because my physical disability causes similar issues to my MH issues so. :dontknow: My support worker also helped me fill out my extenuating circumstances forms when needed (this allowed me to get an uncapped resit in my final year, and I was allowed to graduate with reassessment).

Anyway, in my Needs Assessment which happened before I entered my first year, I basically said that fatigue/pain impairs memory and concentration, so I get distracted really easily. Same applies to depression, the fatigue from that makes it difficult for me to concentrate. The hypervigilance and dissociation from my CPTSD makes it hard to concentrate/retain information too. To help with this stuff (the physical issues and the then undiagnosed MH issues) I got given a bunch of different software from mind mapping to text to speech.

I also needed individual exam arrangements (own room, computer, rest breaks and extra time, they also made sure I had the same invigilator because different people stress me out too much, I get worried they're plotting to kill me ) that were essentially put in place for my physical disability but also indirectly helped me with my anxiety and some other issues. I just didn't tell them about the MH side of it.

When my depression got really severe in my final year the MH mentor helped me with motivation and pacing, she also sent welfare to check on me when concerned (even though that made me angry at the time). I also started seeing/hearing things a lot more during my final year too so she also did reality testing with me a lot, which technically wasn't in her remit, but yeah.

Basically, I had concentration issues, found it difficult to remember information, fatigue, a lack of motivation, anxiety, paranoia, and was becoming increasingly unwell so studying wasn't always my top priority, although I still did well in my degree. There's probably a load of other stuff I've forgotten, but my memory isn't the best.

Oh, and regarding the disability thing, all DSA needs to know is that it has to be long-term and not trivial, and it has to have a negative effect on your studying that could be mitigated by adjustments.
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username3585844
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
Are dyslexia, BPD and Bipolar considered disabilities?

Conditions, most definitely. I’m, not sure about disabilities though.
Dyslexia is a learning disability, BPD and Bipolar are mental health problems.
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