Turn on thread page Beta

Critical services likely to collapse in next wave of Tory cuts watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services.
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...decade-to-2020

    Critical things like - prisons - to be cut 22% - they are already deeply in crisis due to spending cuts.

    Police - a further 16% reduction. Crime is surging.

    NHS - the deepest cuts since the 50s. Hospital closures during the midwinter flu crisis are likely.

    Social care - continued contraction - old age care is amongst the worst in Europe already.

    The UK is a rich country, but much of the money is being kept in tax havens. Taxes have been effectively abolished for the rich and for our largest corporations. This is the result. There is no action by government on tax havens beyond window dressing. Most of the tax havens are British dependencies, controlled ultimately by our Privy Council - which repeatedly permits them to continue. Our governments claim to be powerless to stop them, a lie.

    The government are also scheming to increase rates for student loans and are refusing to get to grips with the ghastly student loans company which overcharges, makes thousands of errors and is not connected properly to the HMRC. The latter has also been drastically cut.

    No serious action will be taken to ease the rental market, which continues to offer some of the highest rental rates in the world and increasingly prices younger people out of our big cities.

    Without public services, Britain is effectively collapsing as a country worth living in, although of course the very rich are happy.

    All of this is being perpetrated by a minority government. We need them out.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    "Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services."


    you already know what is in the budget....

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/....jpg?strip=all


    :afraid:

    btw its Mr Hammond.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    "Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services."


    you already know what is in the budget....

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/....jpg?strip=all


    :afraid:

    btw its Mr Hammond.
    Oh tut. As if it isn't all completely predictable.

    * A few minor ameliorations in the housing market - focused on help to buy, which only supports the well off.

    * Re-announcements of previously allocated money in areas like the NHS.

    * Meaningless statements on house building. Cutting stamp duty for first time buyers - another middle-class oriented item.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    "Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services."


    you already know what is in the budget....

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/....jpg?strip=all


    :afraid:

    btw its Mr Hammond.
    😂 you got me I clicked on it
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Oh tut. As if it isn't all completely predictable.

    * A few minor ameliorations in the housing market - focused on help to buy, which only supports the well off.

    * Re-announcements of previously allocated money in areas like the NHS.

    * Meaningless statements on house building. Cutting stamp duty for first time buyers - another middle-class oriented item.
    i would be happy for there to be a ban on owning more than two houses, and harsh taxation on second homes. that would get the housing market moving, and help young folk in places like Cornwall where the picturesque villages are made up of holiday homes for wealthy Londoners.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Two points of order..

    1) The Tories did propose to take wealth from the middle class and solve social care.. you people went hysterical.

    2) To suggest that ~4% budget rises represent the NHS budget being cut is ludicrous. What has happened here is that was getting as much as 9% under Labour and has been forced onto a very reasonable diet. There are no shortage of services we can cut within the NHS.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Also on the issue of continuing deep cuts whilst throwing money at the middle classes- what like labours policy on free tuition whilst continuing with Tory benefit freezes?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    i would be happy for there to be a ban on owning more than two houses, and harsh taxation on second homes. that would get the housing market moving, and help young folk in places like Cornwall where the picturesque villages are made up of holiday homes for wealthy Londoners.
    The young folk in Cornwall who have jobs, have them mainly on the back of the money that flows out of London in a Range Rover.

    It is fallacy the think that if you remove the people who introduce wealth and take little; the odd traffic light or two; in services every one else becomes better off. The rest simply grow poor together.

    Cornwall isn't competing with the Cotswolds and the Norkfolk coast. If Londoners can't buy cottages in the South West, they will buy them in Chiantishire and Provence.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services.
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...decade-to-2020

    Critical things like - prisons - to be cut 22% - they are already deeply in crisis due to spending cuts.

    Police - a further 16% reduction. Crime is surging.

    NHS - the deepest cuts since the 50s. Hospital closures during the midwinter flu crisis are likely.

    Social care - continued contraction - old age care is amongst the worst in Europe already.

    The UK is a rich country, but much of the money is being kept in tax havens. Taxes have been effectively abolished for the rich and for our largest corporations. This is the result. There is no action by government on tax havens beyond window dressing. Most of the tax havens are British dependencies, controlled ultimately by our Privy Council - which repeatedly permits them to continue. Our governments claim to be powerless to stop them, a lie.

    The government are also scheming to increase rates for student loans and are refusing to get to grips with the ghastly student loans company which overcharges, makes thousands of errors and is not connected properly to the HMRC. The latter has also been drastically cut.

    No serious action will be taken to ease the rental market, which continues to offer some of the highest rental rates in the world and increasingly prices younger people out of our big cities.

    Without public services, Britain is effectively collapsing as a country worth living in, although of course the very rich are happy.

    All of this is being perpetrated by a minority government. We need them out.
    "We need them out"

    And we need Corbyn and Labour like a hole in the head.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Whilst i don't doubt said cuts are going to have a heinous impact on services i suspect saying they'll collapse is little more than hyperbole, like the claims that the NHS is going to fall over like Humpty dumpty, said claims have been continuously made for decades yet its still alive and kicking...
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Moan, moan, moan, moan, moan.

    That's all Labour ever does.

    No solutions other than spend, spend, spend and promises which can never be kept.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Behind the trivial hype of Hammond's budget today (more money to be thrown at the middle classes in various ways) lies the reality of continuing deep cuts to public services.
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...decade-to-2020

    Critical things like - prisons - to be cut 22% - they are already deeply in crisis due to spending cuts.

    Police - a further 16% reduction. Crime is surging.

    NHS - the deepest cuts since the 50s. Hospital closures during the midwinter flu crisis are likely.

    Social care - continued contraction - old age care is amongst the worst in Europe already.

    The UK is a rich country, but much of the money is being kept in tax havens. Taxes have been effectively abolished for the rich and for our largest corporations. This is the result. There is no action by government on tax havens beyond window dressing. Most of the tax havens are British dependencies, controlled ultimately by our Privy Council - which repeatedly permits them to continue. Our governments claim to be powerless to stop them, a lie.

    The government are also scheming to increase rates for student loans and are refusing to get to grips with the ghastly student loans company which overcharges, makes thousands of errors and is not connected properly to the HMRC. The latter has also been drastically cut.

    No serious action will be taken to ease the rental market, which continues to offer some of the highest rental rates in the world and increasingly prices younger people out of our big cities.

    Without public services, Britain is effectively collapsing as a country worth living in, although of course the very rich are happy.

    All of this is being perpetrated by a minority government. We need them out.
    You are a stereotypical Gaurdian reader, panic and ignore half the information. You are making it seem like we will all die a slow and painful death. It's sale man like you who turn a mound into a mountain being a spoiled left wing drama Queen.


    Who caused austerity?

    The labour party! You forget they left office with a budget deficit of £103 billion pounds.

    They spent 13 years in power and this is the price we pay.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/election-2017-39999460

    When you take inflation into account they also borrowed more.

    The Gaurdian like the Daily Mail is a cancer. Think for yourself.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dhasa)
    You are a stereotypical Gaurdian reader, panic and ignore half the information.
    Shame, I like to think of myself as a non-typical Guardian reader. You are ruining my illusions.

    (Original post by dhasa)
    You are making it seem like we will all die a slow and painful death. It's sale man like you who turn a mound into a mountain being a spoiled left wing drama Queen.
    When Brexit kicks in, sadly we are all going to learn what a slow and painful economic death looks like. The rich will be able to console themselves that their tax haven assets are immune - people like the owners of the Daily Mail and other Brexit-pushers.


    (Original post by dhasa)

    Who caused austerity?

    The labour party! You forget they left office with a budget deficit of £103 billion pounds.

    They spent 13 years in power and this is the price we pay.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/election-2017-39999460

    When you take inflation into account they also borrowed more.

    The Gaurdian like the Daily Mail is a cancer. Think for yourself.
    A bit of a silly point - perhaps you haven't heard of the 2008 global financial crisis. Labour didn't react in the right way to it, but they didn't cause it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The young folk in Cornwall who have jobs, have them mainly on the back of the money that flows out of London in a Range Rover.

    It is fallacy the think that if you remove the people who introduce wealth and take little; the odd traffic light or two; in services every one else becomes better off. The rest simply grow poor together.

    Cornwall isn't competing with the Cotswolds and the Norkfolk coast. If Londoners can't buy cottages in the South West, they will buy them in Chiantishire and Provence.
    The underlying economic issue in Cornwall is the classic one of the Distressed Periphery. The problems of areas distant from the economic centres are offset in various ways. When it's a multinational problem, remittances from young people working abroad at the centres of the global economy boost the incomes of the periphery countries. This is a problem when it's all within the same country - most young people leave places like Cornwall to work in places like London, Bristol or Birmingham - they don't generally then remit back to relatives stuck in the Old County. What's left by way of economic opportunity are low-paid and seasonal tourism jobs, government-funded state sector jobs (absolutely critical) and selling remaining property to well off families from the big cities.

    One thing that can be done is promoting more varied tourism across the year and better quality tourism. They try to do a lot of that kind of thing, but it needs government pump-priming to kick start it and a lot of nurturing. Both are lacking in British peripheral areas. The EU have done more, especially in Scotland and Ireland.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Davij038)
    Also on the issue of continuing deep cuts whilst throwing money at the middle classes- what like labours policy on free tuition whilst continuing with Tory benefit freezes?
    I've seen you make this point a number of times.
    There was specific money set aside to deal with the benefit freeze.

    You can't on one hand criticise Labour for being the 'party of the work-shy and scroungers' while simultaneously criticise them for not doing enough to reverse benefit cuts.

    The Stamp Duty proposal surely just benefits homeowners who will simply raise the price of their property?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bornblue)
    The Stamp Duty proposal surely just benefits homeowners who will simply raise the price of their property?
    Yes but that still helps.

    Lets say a first time buyer is paying £150,000 for a property. As of 2 days ago, he had to stump up say a £7,500 deposit and £1,500 stamp duty plus legal fees, furniture and any other costs.

    Now assume the property costs £151,500. He will have to stump up a £7575 deposit, no stamp duty and the other costs will remain the same. He is £1425 cash up.

    The problem with buying is almost always the cash needed, not the lack of borrowing capacity.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Yes but that still helps.

    Lets say a first time buyer is paying £150,000 for a property. As of 2 days ago, he had to stump up say a £7,500 deposit and £1,500 stamp duty plus legal fees, furniture and any other costs.

    Now assume the property costs £151,500. He will have to stump up a £7575 deposit, no stamp duty and the other costs will remain the same. He is £1425 cash up.

    The problem with buying is almost always the cash needed, not the lack of borrowing capacity.
    Still sounds like inducements to the middle class, which I warned in my OP would be forthcoming. The chancellor says the HMRC "have lots of experience" in preventing this simply being another bung to well off parents helping their children buy. Yet the reality will be nothing like that - effectively, the scheme will not work for first time buyers, but for wealthy people buying additional family property. Note that Hammond is relying on the same HMRC to regulate this that he has already cut to the bone on staffing levels.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Prisons- I couldn't care less, spend less on them
    NHS- ranked best healthcare system in the world + £2.8 billion of extra funding announced for NHS England + £10 billion of capital investment for hospitals up to 2022
    Police- crime has consistently fallen from 2008 onwards, it can't go much lower and the chances of being a victim are still very low. I feel very safe here in London
    Social care- not really an issue here, don't really need more spending on this
    Stamp duty cut- excellent, that'll actually benefit me in the future
    Rise in tax free allowance- great, will actually benefit me in the future
    Rise in higher-tax threshold- great news for hard-working, middle class people
    Public sector net borrowing to fall- great, the less we borrow the better
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Recken the law should be changed to exclude tax havens somehow. In fact its funny how the news also say we are in a productivity crisis, tbh I reckon fixing taxes would help produce some moral for the majority of the country.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emms98)
    Prisons- I couldn't care less, spend less on them
    NHS- ranked best healthcare system in the world + £2.8 billion of extra funding announced for NHS England + £10 billion of capital investment for hospitals up to 2022
    Police- crime has consistently fallen from 2008 onwards, it can't go much lower and the chances of being a victim are still very low. I feel very safe here in London
    Social care- not really an issue here, don't really need more spending on this
    Stamp duty cut- excellent, that'll actually benefit me in the future
    Rise in tax free allowance- great, will actually benefit me in the future
    Rise in higher-tax threshold- great news for hard-working, middle class people
    Public sector net borrowing to fall- great, the less we borrow the better
    Even the right-wing Telegraph feels it worth mentioning that crime in London is now worse than New York.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017...stats-suggest/
    Experts say this is because of the removal of neighbourhood policing, a direct result of cuts.

    Prisons should matter to you when the prisoners come out unreformed and violent.

    So even though you seem to take a very narrow, self-centred interpretation of politics, some of the cuts are against your interests and you are being inaccurate when you claim not.
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.