How many hours of revision per GCSE subject? Watch

indie.sxnds
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Hi, i’m in the process of making a revision timetable and it says that it’s advised to do 15-30 hours per subject for success, but would 40 be too much? I was thinking of doing 30+ for subjects i’d like to do at A Level and around 20 for the remaining 7 subjects? Any advice would be appreciated, thanks
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Pink fizz
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
Hi, i’m in the process of making a revision timetable and it says that it’s advised to do 15-30 hours per subject for success, but would 40 be too much? I was thinking of doing 30+ for subjects i’d like to do at A Level and around 20 for the remaining 7 subjects? Any advice would be appreciated, thanks
It depends on the timescale that you're talking about
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RickiestRick
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Is this '30/40 Hours' per week or is it in total?

If it is in total, you will need to do a lot more than that if you want to 'succeed'.


For me, I do about 3 Hours in total per day for the subjects that I decide to revise for on that day.
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laurawatt
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only a couple hours 1/2/3 a day otherwise you could burn out, but you know better than i do about your concentration levels etc.
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
Hi, i’m in the process of making a revision timetable and it says that it’s advised to do 15-30 hours per subject for success, but would 40 be too much? I was thinking of doing 30+ for subjects i’d like to do at A Level and around 20 for the remaining 7 subjects? Any advice would be appreciated, thanks
30 hours in how much time? Really I would think of it more in terms of time per week. It should really depend on the subject - if you're confident in a subject or it's largely coursework-based, you don't have to do as much on it.

Really what's more important is what exactly you do during those hours. Just sitting there and reading a textbook won't do you many favours.
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bangtanstudying
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Do what works for you.

Maybe start off with 2 hours a day, as you plan to do at least 15-30 hours in total for the GSCE subjects, and then gradually increase hours as you get nearer and nearer, perhaps 3 hours - 4 hours.. (Around March - April). My personal advice is that the amount you do doesn't matter. It's how efficient you use your time that does.. You could do 300 hours in total for GSCE's exams but have less good results than someone who did 50 hours overall for GSCE's. Work smarter, not harder.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
Hi, i’m in the process of making a revision timetable and it says that it’s advised to do 15-30 hours per subject for success, but would 40 be too much? I was thinking of doing 30+ for subjects i’d like to do at A Level and around 20 for the remaining 7 subjects? Any advice would be appreciated, thanks
No magic formula. Just do however many hours you feel comfortable with. Revision isn't a one-size-fits-all type of thing.

There are a trillion threads asking 'how much revision should I do', 'please give me some tips on how to get A*/A in ______' but they all end up with the same responses.
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indie.sxnds
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(Original post by TheMindGarage)
30 hours in how much time? Really I would think of it more in terms of time per week. It should really depend on the subject - if you're confident in a subject or it's largely coursework-based, you don't have to do as much on it.

Really what's more important is what exactly you do during those hours. Just sitting there and reading a textbook won't do you many favours.
I want to start revision now, and gradually more intensively as I approach exams, most of my subjects are all exams based, with 0 coursework/cotrolled assessment, apart from two.
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
I want to start revision now, and gradually more intensively as I approach exams, most of my subjects are all exams based, with 0 coursework/cotrolled assessment, apart from two.
Good plan. Last thing you want to do is burn out. I'd say it really depends how much you feel you need to do to get the grades you are aiming for.
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kursk1896
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
Hi, i’m in the process of making a revision timetable and it says that it’s advised to do 15-30 hours per subject for success, but would 40 be too much? I was thinking of doing 30+ for subjects i’d like to do at A Level and around 20 for the remaining 7 subjects? Any advice would be appreciated, thanks
how much you do isnt as important as how effective it is. i know that just reading the textbook for hours on end isnt going to be nearly as effective as past papers and good concise note taking. however, to answer your question, if youre able to spend about 2/3 months before the exams revising consistently, that should be suitable. try to arrange revision based on topic rather than for times, cause youll be able to go through stuff much better with a more firm goal to finish certain bits.
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indie.sxnds
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(Original post by RickiestRick)
Is this '30/40 Hours' per week or is it in total?

If it is in total, you will need to do a lot more than that if you want to 'succeed'.


For me, I do about 3 Hours in total per day for the subjects that I decide to revise for on that day.
initially 30/40 hours per subject total, but im not sure how weekly/daily hours would amount to it.
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SubduedHippo23
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Hi
I think around 20-30 hours per subject sounds great but it is honestly what you think is necessary
I would say, don't start too late and making a timetable is a very good idea btw.
Try not to configure the hours around just what your doing for A-Level; keeping in mind that GCSE/Equivalents will determine what you can/cant do and what is best for you but it is very good that you have some preferences in place already. make sure that your weakest subject is covered comfortably. If you are going to stick to your timetable for the duration of the course and if your exams are in May/June 18; then I believe that you are in a great position at the moment.
Also, if not already, make sure that you understand the structure of your exams .- Exam boards, Dates, Assessment Objectives and have a thorough look at the specification online or in approved books etc. Ask a teacher or mentor if you are ever truly stuck
I too am revising for my exams so good luck!
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indie.sxnds
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(Original post by TheMindGarage)
Good plan. Last thing you want to do is burn out. I'd say it really depends how much you feel you need to do to get the grades you are aiming for.
Thanks. I'm aiming high for all subjects, but biology, chemistry, maths and English in particular. How many hours of efficient revision would you say I should do per week per subject?
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by aspiring-student)
Thanks. I'm aiming high for all subjects, but biology, chemistry, maths and English in particular. How many hours of efficient revision would you say I should do per week per subject?
Nobody can say for sure. Focus on the topics you struggle with. Some people will be able to get top grades with relatively little revision, others may need more.
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troubletracking
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Do more in subjects you're weaker at than the ones you're the best at. If you're great at history, you probably won't need as much revision than you do in a subject you're not so good in, like music or something. Take an hour off history and put it towards music or whatever
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indie.sxnds
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(Original post by SubduedHippo23)
Hi
I think around 20-30 hours per subject sounds great but it is honestly what you think is necessary
I would say, don't start too late and making a timetable is a very good idea btw.
Try not to configure the hours around just what your doing for A-Level; keeping in mind that GCSE/Equivalents will determine what you can/cant do and what is best for you but it is very good that you have some preferences in place already. make sure that your weakest subject is covered comfortably. If you are going to stick to your timetable for the duration of the course and if your exams are in May/June 18; then I believe that you are in a great position at the moment.
Also, if not already, make sure that you understand the structure of your exams .- Exam boards, Dates, Assessment Objectives and have a thorough look at the specification online or in approved books etc. Ask a teacher or mentor if you are ever truly stuck
I too am revising for my exams so good luck!
Hi, thanks! I've got a specification for pretty much every subject which I'm ticking off as I go through each topic. I've also got all the finalised dates of the exams in may/june, its just a matter of sorting through/finding out how many hours weekly/daily per subject that I should do. Thanks for your advice, good luck in your exams too!
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RickiestRick
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oof
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1st superstar
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I mean I plan on doing roughly 24 revision week (in total)
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