Medicine2018
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What is the best way of revising A level chemistry?
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RoseMango
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Hi there,
I've found that the best way for me is to go through the text book and just make notes on the parts of topics that I'm not confident with ans then I literally do all of the past paper questions I can find, focusing on a chapter at a time and then revisiting my notes after each one and adding anything I don't know.
Last year for my AS exam i did all of the questions listed on physics and maths tutor and I got an A so that's what I'm going to do this year to try and get an A* at A2
Really hope this helps
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by RoseMango)
Hi there,
I've found that the best way for me is to go through the text book and just make notes on the parts of topics that I'm not confident with ans then I literally do all of the past paper questions I can find, focusing on a chapter at a time and then revisiting my notes after each one and adding anything I don't know.
Last year for my AS exam i did all of the questions listed on physics and maths tutor and I got an A so that's what I'm going to do this year to try and get an A* at A2
Really hope this helps
Thank you for your advice😊 which exam board do you do?
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G-Sci
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(Original post by Medicine2018)
What is the best way of revising A level chemistry?
I would say that past papers are essential! For me they were, and even now at masters level, they still are!
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RoseMango
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(Original post by Medicine2018)
Thank you for your advice😊 which exam board do you do?
You're welcome I do AQA. What about you?
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RoseMango
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My sixth form was with OCR but switched to AQA a couple of years ago. My teacher gave me old copies of the OCR textbooks they used and I've also done OCR papers as extra revision and i must say that I much prefer AQA.
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by RoseMango)
You're welcome I do AQA. What about you?
I do edexcel
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by georgem93)
I would say that past papers are essential! For me they were, and even now at masters level, they still are!
Thank you 😊
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Medicine2018
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Do you know any good websites with past papers by topic order?
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RoseMango
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(Original post by Medicine2018)
Do you know any good websites with past papers by topic order?
http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/...level-edexcel/
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Medicine2018
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Thank you 😊
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Medicine2018
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How much revision per week would you recommend to get an A or A*at A level?
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j4mil417
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(Original post by Medicine2018)
What is the best way of revising A level chemistry?
Make your own notes and revise from them. Then do past paper questions they are so key its unreal! Even if your board is AQA, mine was AQA as well but my teacher gave tons of OCR and Edexcel questions which was very useful! The exams are obviously linear, so as your doing A2 now make sure you keep some time for your AS revision don't leave it till last minute. If your doing physical A2 just simply revise physical AS and integrate. When it comes to the number of hours of revision, do as much as you can but obviously don't over do it and leave enough time for your other subjects and for other things such as sleeping and eating! I follow the rule of 8, 8 hours revision, 8 hours sleep and 8 hours rest. Obviously the 8 hours revision doesn't mean 8 hours just for chemistry but it involved all my other subjects. Don't fret over revision its not the end of the world if you don't get things done as you've planned. Ngl A2 is so much nicer than AS you'll love it! Hope that helps!
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by j4mil417)
Make your own notes and revise from them. Then do past paper questions they are so key its unreal! Even if your board is AQA, mine was AQA as well but my teacher gave tons of OCR and Edexcel questions which was very useful! The exams are obviously linear, so as your doing A2 now make sure you keep some time for your AS revision don't leave it till last minute. If your doing physical A2 just simply revise physical AS and integrate. When it comes to the number of hours of revision, do as much as you can but obviously don't over do it and leave enough time for your other subjects and for other things such as sleeping and eating! I follow the rule of 8, 8 hours revision, 8 hours sleep and 8 hours rest. Obviously the 8 hours revision doesn't mean 8 hours just for chemistry but it involved all my other subjects. Don't fret over revision its not the end of the world if you don't get things done as you've planned. Ngl A2 is so much nicer than AS you'll love it! Hope that helps!
Thank you 😊
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R2D2IsASith
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(Original post by RoseMango)
Hi there,
I've found that the best way for me is to go through the text book and just make notes on the parts of topics that I'm not confident with ans then I literally do all of the past paper questions I can find, focusing on a chapter at a time and then revisiting my notes after each one and adding anything I don't know.
Last year for my AS exam i did all of the questions listed on physics and maths tutor and I got an A so that's what I'm going to do this year to try and get an A* at A2
Really hope this helps
Do exactly what RoseMango said. I also like to take a read through the specification and write notes for it before I take notes on my textbook. it helps me to understand what they want me to know, if that makes sense.
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by R2D2IsASith)
Do exactly what RoseMango said. I also like to take a read through the specification and write notes for it before I take notes on my textbook. it helps me to understand what they want me to know, if that makes sense.
Thank you 😊
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mirabella555
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(Original post by Medicine2018)
What is the best way of revising A level chemistry?
I achieved an A* at GCSE and A Level and these are the best tips I have.

1. Make your own notes
I compiled the content from my school, the content from my textbook etc. into really nicely organised (and aesthetically pleasing) notes, reason being that I like having everything nicely put in one area. Also I like revising from pretty notes.

2. Your approach
My approach to class tests, which I had after every topic, was this:
Learn the material off by heart, QUESTION YOURSELF AS TO WHETHER YOU UNDERSTAND IT OR NOT! Understanding is essential so make a conscious effort to do so. Then I would do the practice exam Qs located in my textbook. After my class test, I would look into WHY I got questions wrong, if any.

3. Give yourself room for failure
A Level Chemistry is not just memorise the stuff and get good grades (I naive 17 year old me learnt after I did my first AS Level Chem test and got like a C, when I had all A*s at GCSE and never achieved a C in my life). It is a work in progress where, with time, your understanding strengthens and it starts to make sense. So, if you slip up in tests, go back and see where you went wrong. Do the same for when you do past papers. These are all efforts to improve your UNDERSTANDING, which is the most crucial thing since A Level Chemistry is no longer memorisation and it is more applied. My grades varied at AS Level in my tests, and by A2, after I mastered understanding, everything fit like a puzzle. I second what someone else said- A2 level is actually much nicer. Not sure if its 'easier' but, after understanding AS, A2 becomes easier to understand and also the topics are more interesting.

Work on understanding more than anything, by following the tips I gave you. Good luck x
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Medicine2018
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(Original post by mirabella555)
I achieved an A* at GCSE and A Level and these are the best tips I have.

1. Make your own notes
I compiled the content from my school, the content from my textbook etc. into really nicely organised (and aesthetically pleasing) notes, reason being that I like having everything nicely put in one area. Also I like revising from pretty notes.

2. Your approach
My approach to class tests, which I had after every topic, was this:
Learn the material off by heart, QUESTION YOURSELF AS TO WHETHER YOU UNDERSTAND IT OR NOT! Understanding is essential so make a conscious effort to do so. Then I would do the practice exam Qs located in my textbook. After my class test, I would look into WHY I got questions wrong, if any.

3. Give yourself room for failure
A Level Chemistry is not just memorise the stuff and get good grades (I naive 17 year old me learnt after I did my first AS Level Chem test and got like a C, when I had all A*s at GCSE and never achieved a C in my life). It is a work in progress where, with time, your understanding strengthens and it starts to make sense. So, if you slip up in tests, go back and see where you went wrong. Do the same for when you do past papers. These are all efforts to improve your UNDERSTANDING, which is the most crucial thing since A Level Chemistry is no longer memorisation and it is more applied. My grades varied at AS Level in my tests, and by A2, after I mastered understanding, everything fit like a puzzle. I second what someone else said- A2 level is actually much nicer. Not sure if its 'easier' but, after understanding AS, A2 becomes easier to understand and also the topics are more interesting.

Work on understanding more than anything, by following the tips I gave you. Good luck x
Thankyou 😊😊
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bibuloustricorn
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(Original post by RoseMango)
My sixth form was with OCR but switched to AQA a couple of years ago. My teacher gave me old copies of the OCR textbooks they used and I've also done OCR papers as extra revision and i must say that I much prefer AQA.
Why do you prefer AQA?
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