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    I'm in year 12 and what I have so far is:
    a week in a hospital shadowing a doctors (feb 2018)
    a day in cellular pathology
    a MOOC
    I have nothing else and part of it was to blame for my teachers because I had sighned up for this ambassardor thing for my extracurricular activity (you choose one) and 2 months later my teacher said I can't do it because I'm not confident enough. ****ing *****, i put my name down and waited so long for it and at the end i heard from my friends that she was being desperate and asking others to do it
    I called up all the GP's near me- they all said no
    I called up all the care homes near me- they said no to
    What should I do, because my GCSE'S weren't very good and it's like life doesn't want me to have work experience,
    plz help!
    thanks
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    Can you try and get some volunteering in a hospital? You seem to have prepared well so far with your upcoming work experience but voluntary work in a caring setting shows commitment and capacity for empathy/ care.
    Look on websites for all your local hospitals- lots will have application forms for volunteering. Try a few more care homes. Do you know about age uk? It's really easy to get some experience with them and chances are there will be a local one near you.
    I would also recommend Revitalise- an organisation that gives respite holidays to severely disabled people. I couldn't recommend this enough; I went in year 11 summer and all the guests seemed extremely happy there and it's wonderful to socialise with them, you get to meet an amazing array of different individuals and I found it greatly increased my confidence. You just have to pay with your time- all accomodation/food is included for a week and you take guests out on various trips (e.g. lake district, blackpool, london centre has a day trip to france) and get to meet some other amazing volunteers, too. Honestly it was the best week of my life LOL and I gained a lot from it. There's 3 centres in the country and you stay for a week- look it up maybe
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    The week shadowing a doctor and a day in the cellular pathology (lab?) sound good, but make sure you're able to reflect on them. The reason medical schools tend to value volunteering over shadowing is because they know it's hard to find places to take you for shadowing, but proactively seeking out and committing to an hour a week for a month, two months etc. shows your dedication.

    I would recommend any kind of nursing home, care home, hospices somewhere near you and ask if you can volunteer, avoid using "work experience". Check with the unis you might want to apply to, some don't even ask for voluntary work in a strictly healthcare setting - just one that shows a personal commitment as well as a dedication to benefitting others. You can also volunteer in hospitals on the wards doing the tea rounds etc, some NHS trusts have a specific "young volunteer scheme".

    Good luck with your hunt, feel free to PM me with any more questions or specifics.
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    (Original post by niamh787)
    Can you try and get some volunteering in a hospital? You seem to have prepared well so far with your upcoming work experience but voluntary work in a caring setting shows commitment and capacity for empathy/ care.
    Look on websites for all your local hospitals- lots will have application forms for volunteering. Try a few more care homes. Do you know about age uk? It's really easy to get some experience with them and chances are there will be a local one near you.
    I would also recommend Revitalise- an organisation that gives respite holidays to severely disabled people. I couldn't recommend this enough; I went in year 11 summer and all the guests seemed extremely happy there and it's wonderful to socialise with them, you get to meet an amazing array of different individuals and I found it greatly increased my confidence. You just have to pay with your time- all accomodation/food is included for a week and you take guests out on various trips (e.g. lake district, blackpool, london centre has a day trip to france) and get to meet some other amazing volunteers, too. Honestly it was the best week of my life LOL and I gained a lot from it. There's 3 centres in the country and you stay for a week- look it up maybe
    I already have, and thanks but do you think extracurricular activities mean that much for medicine because I literally have none
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    (Original post by jsg9)
    The week shadowing a doctor and a day in the cellular pathology (lab?) sound good, but make sure you're able to reflect on them. The reason medical schools tend to value volunteering over shadowing is because they know it's hard to find places to take you for shadowing, but proactively seeking out and committing to an hour a week for a month, two months etc. shows your dedication.

    I would recommend any kind of nursing home, care home, hospices somewhere near you and ask if you can volunteer, avoid using "work experience". Check with the unis you might want to apply to, some don't even ask for voluntary work in a strictly healthcare setting - just one that shows a personal commitment as well as a dedication to benefitting others. You can also volunteer in hospitals on the wards doing the tea rounds etc, some NHS trusts have a specific "young volunteer scheme".

    Good luck with your hunt, feel free to PM me with any more questions or specifics.
    Sorry what do you mean by that?
    It's because my friends who want to do medicine are in yr 12 and have so much extracurricular activities/work experience so far and I literally have none , I'll try but it prob won't work
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    I already have, and thanks but do you think extracurricular activities mean that much for medicine because I literally have none
    You're doing great then- you have nothing to worry about in terms of volunteering/ work experience. Many find it very difficult to get anything in a hospital.
    I have very few extra curricular activities too. I don't think they matter anywhere near as much as volunteering but if you could find just one thing to start up this would probably be beneficial. What about scouts? Do you do dofe? How about taking up a musical instrument? You don't necessarily have to be an expert at anything but I suppose admissions might want to see a well rounded person with other interests. Just join a school club that you find mildly interesting, perhaps?
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    Sorry what do you mean by that?
    It's because my friends who want to do medicine are in yr 12 and have so much extracurricular activities/work experience so far and I literally have none , I'll try but it prob won't work
    I mean when you are calling these care homes, nursing homes, hospices etc. I would avoid asking if you can do "work experience" there. You should be looking for a more hands on role, hence, you should ask about volunteering instead, they'll probably be more open to this. Work experience implies a short amount of time spent there where you don't actually do anything, you just follow someone around. Volunteering is important as it allows you to develop the soft skills that are needed in the healthcare profession and it will look better on your personal statement if you've shown a longer term, hands on commitment.

    There will always be stronger candidates than you, but you have to only look at yourself and what you can do to make yourself the strongest applicant you can be. It's a competitive process, anything that you can add to your UCAS form and personal statement may just give you an edge. I know there's a general consensus that admissions tutors don't care about personal statements, especially for STEM subjects, but Medicine is not this way. Some medical schools place quite a large emphasis on your PS, others not so much, but they'll be read anyway, it forms an important part of your application - and if your GCSE grades aren't the best, it's likely you'll be applying to the med schools that do place more emphasis on things like your PS over grades. For this reason extra curricular is important. It should only form a small amount of your statement, but it shows you are a well rounded individual who will be able to balance the workload that Medicine demands.
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    (Original post by jsg9)
    I mean when you are calling these care homes, nursing homes, hospices etc. I would avoid asking if you can do "work experience" there. You should be looking for a more hands on role, hence, you should ask about volunteering instead, they'll probably be more open to this. Work experience implies a short amount of time spent there where you don't actually do anything, you just follow someone around. Volunteering is important as it allows you to develop the soft skills that are needed in the healthcare profession and it will look better on your personal statement if you've shown a longer term, hands on commitment.

    There will always be stronger candidates than you, but you have to only look at yourself and what you can do to make yourself the strongest applicant you can be. It's a competitive process, anything that you can add to your UCAS form and personal statement may just give you an edge. I know there's a general consensus that admissions tutors don't care about personal statements, especially for STEM subjects, but Medicine is not this way. Some medical schools place quite a large emphasis on your PS, others not so much, but they'll be read anyway, it forms an important part of your application - and if your GCSE grades aren't the best, it's likely you'll be applying to the med schools that do place more emphasis on things like your PS over grades. For this reason extra curricular is important. It should only form a small amount of your statement, but it shows you are a well rounded individual who will be able to balance the workload that Medicine demands.
    Funny, because there was so much extra-curricular activities available at the start of yr 12, (peer mentoring, helping out in lessons, young enterprize etc) but I left everything for the wellbeing ambassador, waited two months to be told by my f.u.c.k.i.n.g teachers that I can't do it. sucks
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    Funny, because there was so much extra-curricular activities available at the start of yr 12, (peer mentoring, helping out in lessons, young enterprize etc) but I left everything for the wellbeing ambassador, waited two months to be told by my f.u.c.k.i.n.g teachers that I can't do it. sucks
    Surely it's not too late to still get involved in something. It can be anything, unrelated to school as well. Something in the wider community, a skill, a hobby. Yes, it sucks that you missed out on the wellbeing ambassador but if you really want to go into medicine you need to move on quickly and find other things. You can always go back to these teachers who wouldn't let you do this because of your "confidence", tell them your aspirations and that you need to build your confidence, and it will be beneficial to both you and those who you would be mentoring. If there's anything you can get involved in either in your community or at your school - just do it.
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    Check out your local hospital's volunteering page. Most have one and are always looking for volunteers. Also, try hospices, and your local university's volunteering page.
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    Email your hospital volunteering head to get on regular shifts there, or at a care home.
    Having spoken to admissions tutors in the past, work experience like shadowing is useful, but it can be hard to get and that alone does not necessarily show commitment. I've been told a few times they value something regular far more.
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    Take a deep breath. And breathe.

    No use being angry anymore because you got the rug pulled from under you, now you just need to focus on getting something else. You say you do not have work experience, but you do. What you lack currently is a role that shows commitment, aka volunteering.

    As others have said, try hospitals, hospices, care homes, etc. again and again, even look at those slightly further out. Places are often kinder when you mention you are looking to volunteer rather than work experience, as it means they have you on board longer than a week. Less hands on, but you could also try charity shops/stalls who are very often looking for volunteers. It doesn't matter that it may not be medically related, doing so will show you can stick with something, and will also improve communication skills and confidence etc.

    Most medical admissions teams understand how competitive getting all these things are, and will look at quality rather than quantity of experience. When you go on to write your personal statement, some admissions tutors I have spoken to are not always impressed by a list of 5 one week shadowing experience with no reflection; they are far more impressed by a candidate who has reflected on one week of experience and shown an understanding of the vocation. Even better if it's something regular they've kept up over time. They can also ask these questions during interview, and the same thing applies.
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    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    Take a deep breath. And breathe.

    No use being angry anymore because you got the rug pulled from under you, now you just need to focus on getting something else. You say you do not have work experience, but you do. What you lack currently is a role that shows commitment, aka volunteering.

    As others have said, try hospitals, hospices, care homes, etc. again and again, even look at those slightly further out. Places are often kinder when you mention you are looking to volunteer rather than work experience, as it means they have you on board longer than a week. Less hands on, but you could also try charity shops/stalls who are very often looking for volunteers. It doesn't matter that it may not be medically related, doing so will show you can stick with something, and will also improve communication skills and confidence etc.

    Most medical admissions teams understand how competitive getting all these things are, and will look at quality rather than quantity of experience. When you go on to write your personal statement, some admissions tutors I have spoken to are not always impressed by a list of 5 one week shadowing experience with no reflection; they are far more impressed by a candidate who has reflected on one week of experience and shown an understanding of the vocation. Even better if it's something regular they've kept up over time. They can also ask these questions during interview, and the same thing applies.
    I know what you mean Quality over quantity definetly, however, my situation is different because my GCSE'S weren't very good so i have to make other aspects of my application stronger, meaning getting as much work experience as I can. i hope you know what i mean
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    I know what you mean Quality over quantity definetly, however, my situation is different because my GCSE'S weren't very good so i have to make other aspects of my application stronger, meaning getting as much work experience as I can. i hope you know what i mean
    Doesn't matter. We are not here to talk about your GCSEs. We are giving you advice on trying to get you work experience.

    Now the rest of this post is going to get harsher.

    Tomorrow, drag yourself into town and walk into charity shops and ask about volunteering. Not medical? Who cares. Something is better than nothing.

    You have the rest of this year and the summer before Year 13. Want to show commitment? Go do something rather than moan about GCSEs and missed opportunities here.
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    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    Doesn't matter. We are not here to talk about your GCSEs. We are giving you advice on trying to get you work experience.

    Now the rest of this post is going to get harsher.

    Tomorrow, drag yourself into town and walk into charity shops and ask about volunteering. Not medical? Who cares. Something is better than nothing.

    You have the rest of this year and the summer before Year 13. Want to show commitment? Go do something rather than moan about GCSEs and missed opportunities here.
    Wait, I can't get work experience/volunteering in year 13??? When are the deadlines for Medicine usually?
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    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    Doesn't matter. We are not here to talk about your GCSEs. We are giving you advice on trying to get you work experience.

    Now the rest of this post is going to get harsher.

    Tomorrow, drag yourself into town and walk into charity shops and ask about volunteering. Not medical? Who cares. Something is better than nothing.

    You have the rest of this year and the summer before Year 13. Want to show commitment? Go do something rather than moan about GCSEs and missed opportunities here.
    I just checked online and the deadline for all medicine application is 15 october meaning I just have THIS year to get my work experience/extra-curricular activities sorted out, ****
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    I just checked online and the deadline for all medicine application is 15 october meaning I just have THIS year to get my work experience/extra-curricular activities sorted out, ****
    I'm saying this from experience as I also had volunteering plans fall through and had to get some within a year. IT. IS. POSSIBLE. Stop moaning and get your act together.
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    I just checked online and the deadline for all medicine application is 15 october meaning I just have THIS year to get my work experience/extra-curricular activities sorted out, ****
    don't worry you have loads of time! If you just go out of your way to sort stuff I'm sure it will work out but you need to be active in doing so. Get onto those websites for volunteering, send in like 10 applications (if you get them all you can always just say you don't want some of them anymore), just find out about clubs in school (science club? reading? debate?? Literally anything) and pluck up the courage to actually email/ ask about joining. They won't deny you just because you haven't been going since the start. It's easy to worry about what you're not doing, it's harder to fix that, but you need to. Don't be scared of emailing your teachers or organisations to ask etc. !
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    (Original post by a_d2010)
    I know what you mean Quality over quantity definetly, however, my situation is different because my GCSE'S weren't very good so i have to make other aspects of my application stronger, meaning getting as much work experience as I can. i hope you know what i mean
    Listen to me carefully. THERE IS A MASSIVE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WORK EXPERIENCE AND VOLUNTEERING! Volunteering shows a long term commitment whereas work experience is short term. Unis prefer volunteering and some is better than nothing. Go to a local hospice, charity shop or care home and ask them whether you can VOLUNTEER for 1-2 hours per week. Even if you it for 5-9 months, it will show the medical school that you are dedicated and have a strong commitment. I know lots of people who got rejected even though they had lots of work experience but those who did volunteering, they were more successful (from my current school where 17 kids went onto medical/medical science courses last year). Places are reluctant to give work experience but if you ask to volunteer, they will be much more willing.
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    (Original post by y.u.mad.bro?)
    Listen to me carefully. THERE IS A MASSIVE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WORK EXPERIENCE AND VOLUNTEERING! Volunteering shows a long term commitment whereas work experience is short term. Unis prefer volunteering and some is better than nothing. Go to a local hospice, charity shop or care home and ask them whether you can VOLUNTEER for 1-2 hours per week. Even if you it for 5-9 months, it will show the medical school that you are dedicated and have a strong commitment. I know lots of people who got rejected even though they had lots of work experience but those who did volunteering, they were more successful (from my current school where 17 kids went onto medical/medical science courses last year). Places are reluctant to give work experience but if you ask to volunteer, they will be much more willing.
    Thank you so much, do you feel like my GCSE'S will put me at a disadvantage though?
 
 
 
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