PlasticOwl
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Does anyone know of any reputational ranking of MSc Computer Science (Conversion) courses?

I know there are heaps of ways of ranking universities; e.g. thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk and theguardian.com university guide (plus one by the times, but it is behind a paywall) and frameworks like Research Excellence Framework and Teaching Excellence Framework; but these tend to look at Departments rather than individual courses.

Why do I ask? I'm considering Bath or Bristol. I was at the Bristol postgraduate open day recently and was discussing the recent price hike. The student I was talking to said that in her opinion the Bristol MSc was second only to the one at Imperial and the reputation might explain why they could raise the price (plus that they have so many international students). Which is a completely fair enough opinion - but it intrigued me on the way home to wonder what her basis was for her assessment (it may have been anecdotal).

If you don't know of one I'd be happy with anecdotal views too
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username3079870
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(Original post by PlasticOwl)
Does anyone know of any reputational ranking of MSc Computer Science (Conversion) courses?

I know there are heaps of ways of ranking universities; e.g. thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk and theguardian.com university guide (plus one by the times, but it is behind a paywall) and frameworks like Research Excellence Framework and Teaching Excellence Framework; but these tend to look at Departments rather than individual courses.

Why do I ask? I'm considering Bath or Bristol. I was at the Bristol postgraduate open day recently and was discussing the recent price hike. The student I was talking to said that in her opinion the Bristol MSc was second only to the one at Imperial and the reputation might explain why they could raise the price (plus that they have so many international students). Which is a completely fair enough opinion - but it intrigued me on the way home to wonder what her basis was for her assessment (it may have been anecdotal).

If you don't know of one I'd be happy with anecdotal views too
So these MSc Courses, despite their title, normally don't teach you as much as a Bachelors degree in CS, so bear that in mind. We (my place of work) actually prefer CS undergrads to conversion students for employment, but that's usually because the conversion MSc students we see have just about passed their masters and aren't really that techie.

In terms of the places you mentioned, Bristol has an overall better rep for CS. I spoke to tech recruiters in London when I was thinking of moving there, and most of them said they get the best employer feedback and most requests from grads from Oxbridge, UCL, Imperial, Bristol and Southampton.

May I ask, what is your overall goal with the MSc Conversion course?
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PlasticOwl
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(Original post by jestersnow)
So these MSc Courses, despite their title, normally don't teach you as much as a Bachelors degree in CS, so bear that in mind. We (my place of work) actually prefer CS undergrads to conversion students for employment, but that's usually because the conversion MSc students we see have just about passed their masters and aren't really that techie.

In terms of the places you mentioned, Bristol has an overall better rep for CS. I spoke to tech recruiters in London when I was thinking of moving there, and most of them said they get the best employer feedback and most requests from grads from Oxbridge, UCL, Imperial, Bristol and Southampton.

May I ask, what is your overall goal with the MSc Conversion course?
Thanks JS, I really appreciate your input. It chimes with the postgrad I spoke with. I very much get your point that undergrads are better versed, but I'm unfortunately past that point in life now!

I'm just past 40 and leaving a government job where I manage Information Systems and want a career switch to a job where I actually create/design them (e.g. software development). I've done some amateur coding (i.e. published an Android app on Google Play) but I want to cement my skills and frankly spend a year devoted purely to learning something I enjoy. I'm also currently doing a part-time MSc in Information Capability Management (as part of my job) - but this is definitely more the business/management end of the spectrum than coding. Although far from rich, I've built up enough of a cushion over my career that I can do this without financial hardship. Although having said that a whole 3 years as an undergrad would be stretching it!

I've commented in another thread that there are other cons and pros to Bristol vs Bath. In short the former is more practical as regards software dev; whereas the latter is more academic and cheaper.

For me non-academic factors are a big point too: Bristol wins on affordable housing and follow on software jobs. But they are close and both great cities. It is a choice of one or the other though due to family reasons.

Again appreciate your reply.
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Rosales_
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(Original post by jestersnow)
So these MSc Courses, despite their title, normally don't teach you as much as a Bachelors degree in CS, so bear that in mind. We (my place of work) actually prefer CS undergrads to conversion students for employment, but that's usually because the conversion MSc students we see have just about passed their masters and aren't really that techie.
Is the undergraduate degree relevant in any way?
I mean, a Mechanical/Civil engineering BSc can't be the same as a BA in Liberal arts...
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username3079870
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(Original post by Rosales_)
Is the undergraduate degree relevant in any way?
I mean, a Mechanical/Civil engineering BSc can't be the same as a BA in Liberal arts...
How do you mean? Relevant in relation to applying for the course? Relevant in terms of how easy it would be to transition to CS from engineering vs arts?
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Rosales_
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(Original post by jestersnow)
How do you mean? Relevant in relation to applying for the course? Relevant in terms of how easy it would be to transition to CS from engineering vs arts?
Sorry.
I mean to the eyes of a potential employer.
Of course what counts is what you show in an interview, but years of scientific knowledge and thinking can't be bought.
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username3079870
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(Original post by Rosales_)
Sorry.
I mean to the eyes of a potential employer.
Of course what counts is what you show in an interview, but years of scientific knowledge and thinking can't be bought.
Do you mean is an engineering undergraduate degree more helpful than an arts degree when applying for a job in a technology company? Sorry I am reading this on my phone and I am not entirely sure I am getting the point your are making or the question you are asking.
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Rosales_
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(Original post by jestersnow)
Do you mean is an engineering undergraduate degree more helpful than an arts degree when applying for a job in a technology company? Sorry I am reading this on my phone and I am not entirely sure I am getting the point your are making or the question you are asking.
Exactly.
I know it may sound like a dumb question, but I'm still figuring out what you could learn from a MSc like this.

BTW, the conversione degree @Swansea University has really nice optional modules.

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/postgraduat...f1=is-expanded
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PlasticOwl
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(Original post by Rosales_)
Exactly.
I know it may sound like a dumb question, but I'm still figuring out what you could learn from a MSc like this.

BTW, the conversione degree @Swansea University has really nice optional modules.

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/postgraduat...f1=is-expanded
Jessica I think these MSc courses are mostly meant for people who don't have a Computer Science (CS) background, but want to go into a career involving software development or related pursuit. Indeed most of them specify that they don't accept people with first degrees in CS. You are probably right that a more technical first degree would probably help, but I don't think it is pre-requisite.

The Swansea course looks interesting, but for me it is Bath or Bristol.
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ScottLee
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PlasticOwl, may I ask your final decision?

I have the offer of Bath, and Bristol too.

I have worked for five years, and are currently a CTO of a start-up company.

My study goal is to work in the UK.
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ShayaanK
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Where did you end up going then?
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ScottLee
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I finally get admission from Warwick MSc CS.
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ShayaanK
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What's your undergrad major?
(Original post by ScottLee)
I finally get admission from Warwick MSc CS.
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ScottLee
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I studid in Taiwan. The major is Management Information System. It is a major between CS and Business. And, I have worked for 5 years as a software engineer.
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