UCAS: within character limit; over line limit Watch

MarshmallowStars
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So basically, my personal statement has 4000 characters (pretty proud about this) but I am over the 47 line limit (51 lines).

Is my personal statement still feasible or do I need to shorten it (though I really don't want to do this)?

Btw, there are lines between my paragraphs and getting rid of them does put them at the 47 limit, but one great chunk of writing doesn't look great.

Thank you
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fxlloutboyy
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well the limit is 47 lines I believe ucas will not submit it if it's over
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jwholmes0801
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(Original post by MarshmallowStars)
So basically, my personal statement has 4000 characters (pretty proud about this) but I am over the 47 line limit (51 lines).

Is my personal statement still feasible or do I need to shorten it (though I really don't want to do this)?

Thank you
What I had to do was cut out the lines in between the paragraphs.... I was at 3996 but 52 lines so just had to cut the gaps between paragraphs. It should look fine as the last line of each paragraph (at least in my case) didn't take up the whole line so could be easily distinguishable.
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MrsKA
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You’ll lose anything over the limit, so yours would only submit the 47 lines and you’d lose everything else. I’d remove the lines in between, and see if you can reword the paragraphs to have each final line end early, as mentioned before.
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MarshmallowStars
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(Original post by fxlloutboyy)
well the limit is 47 lines I believe ucas will not submit it if it's over
Ah okay, thank you
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MarshmallowStars
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(Original post by jwholmes0801)
What I had to do was cut out the lines in between the paragraphs.... I was at 3996 but 52 lines so just had to cut the gaps between paragraphs. It should look fine as the last line of each paragraph (at least in my case) didn't take up the whole line so could be easily distinguishable.
Okay! I'll see what I can do thanks
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MarshmallowStars
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(Original post by MrsKA)
You’ll lose anything over the limit, so yours would only submit the 47 lines and you’d lose everything else. I’d remove the lines in between, and see if you can reword the paragraphs to have each final line end early, as mentioned before.
Thank makes sense; thank you
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DrawTheLine
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The limit is 47 lines therefore it cannot be over 47 lines. You need to shorten it.
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LemonBurst2
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Because their rule is whichever one is shorter that’s what it goes by. I think I read that it was 47 lines of 95 characters. Or 3000 characters including spaces
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PQ
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(Original post by LRxS)
I also had 4,000 characters dead 😂 I had to get rid of the spaces between paragraphs so mine was a big chunk. Admissions tutors won’t think it looks bad; they know you have a line limit & I’m sure they’d rather read 4,000 characters of good stuff in one chunk than a version with pretty gaps between paragraphs but less actual information.
I can assure you that admissions staff DO think a wall of text looks bad. It’s clear that you are unable to present your thoughts within the given limits.

I’ve read thousands of PSs. I have never read one that couldn’t benefit from having some content removed. Particularly those that are close to the character limit.
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PQ
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(Original post by LRxS)
I’m not meaning have a wall of text; you should still hit enter after each paragraph. I just mean if you can’t quite have a whole line’s space, then don’t. Surely if whether or not your paragraphs are neat is the deciding factor in getting an offer, your actual PS content must be appalling.
If you present your PS poorly because you didn’t edit it down then you risk important points being missed.

As I said I have never seen a PS that wouldn’t be improved by editing down the content.

Your PS won’t make a difference in whether you get an offer for well over 90% of courses. That doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing a good job.
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SuperHuman98
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Quality over quantity . I did mine 3600 charachters so was able to space 4/5 (cant remember) paragraphs and even then I still feel like there was something I could remove
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MrsKA
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(Original post by PQ)
If you present your PS poorly because you didn’t edit it down then you risk important points being missed.

As I said I have never seen a PS that wouldn’t be improved by editing down the content.

Your PS won’t make a difference in whether you get an offer for well over 90% of courses. That doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing a good job.
In all honesty my PS was appalling and I just couldn’t make it better; my application is a little unusual in that I’ve applied to one course in which I’m hoping to return at y3 after a 7 year break (kids). I was cutting and rewording and editing like it was going out of fashion, and still couldn’t move from “story telling” as opposed to personal-statement-writing. It was all honest and true, I just couldn’t make it less personality flair-y, and had too much to explain.

I’m delighted you’ve said this 😂😂😂
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ILuvFood1234
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Make some of the things you've written simple. The quality of the content will remain but the sentence just has to be more simple and short so it's direct.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by LRxS)
Surely if whether or not your paragraphs are neat is the deciding factor in getting an offer, your actual PS content must be appalling.
It isn't a question of neatness, it is a question of being fit for purpose in the context of the process.

Put yourself in the position of an admissions tutor (who is the most important figure in the process fas far as the candidate is concerned), forced to read hundreds of statements. How would your eyes and head feel at the end of a day of reading slabs of text? How well-disposed would you be to reading the fine detail?

How would you react to seeing the odd gem amongst the dross, clearly paragraphed, well presented and clearly written? Even after a day of reading drivel that has given you a headache?

Each candidate should be striving to make sure their application has as few weaknesses as possible, as nobody is perfect and this is a competitive process. This means having good results to report, a good PS and a good reference. At this stage the only factor you can influence is the PS - so make sure it is as good as possible, just in case you are not quite as perfect as you think you are. This includes presenting it well.

I have never spoken to an admissions tutor who didn't bemoan his/her fate at reading slabs of text, and who didn't express pleasure at finding a clear, well presented one - with lines between paragraphs.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by MarshmallowStars)
do I need to shorten it
You do. A clear, succinct and well-presented PS typically has around 3,500 characters in it. The operative limit is 47 lines.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by LRxS)
it quite clearly doesn’t matter.
That's a strong conclusion to reach.

Or maybe the rest of your application was so strong that you got interviews despite the poor PS. Other candidates will not be so lucky.

Or maybe the interview rate for your subject is very high and, possibly, your PS hasn't even been read. There are plenty of courses that give offers to almost 100% of candidates, and most interviews are really only opportunities to meet and for you to see the university and be sold to, or a test of your perseverance and interest. Some departments make interview invitations and give offers only to those that turn up, but to nobody else, for instance.

The difficulty lies with those who apply where the PS matters.
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LRxS
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It isn't a question of neatness, it is a question of being fit for purpose in the context of the process.

Put yourself in the position of an admissions tutor (who is the most important figure in the process fas far as the candidate is concerned), forced to read hundreds of statements. How would your eyes and head feel at the end of a day of reading slabs of text? How well-disposed would you be to reading the fine detail?

How would you react to seeing the odd gem amongst the dross, clearly paragraphed, well presented and clearly written? Even after a day of reading drivel that has given you a headache?

Each candidate should be striving to make sure their application has as few weaknesses as possible, as nobody is perfect and this is a competitive process. This means having good results to report, a good PS and a good reference. At this stage the only factor you can influence is the PS - so make sure it is as good as possible, just in case you are not quite as perfect as you think you are. This includes presenting it well.

I have never spoken to an admissions tutor who didn't bemoan his/her fate at reading slabs of text, and who didn't express pleasure at finding a clear, well presented one - with lines between paragraphs.
Yeah well I guess I was given incorrect advice by my school or I just had more to say for myself than some applicants.

I cut and cut and cut to be as concise as possible and I was damn proud of my final statement. I had some quite complex academic stuff to articulate and I needed all the characters I could get so forgive me if I didn’t care about having beautiful paragraphs.

I’m sure admissions tutors appreciate paragraphs; I’ll bet they also like statements that are actually half decent.

Also, don’t patronise me. I’m perfectly capable of putting myself in an admissions tutor’s shoes; it would be a terrible personal statement if I didn’t. Just because it’s not how you’d have done it doesn’t make it unfit for purpose; unfit for purpose, in my case, would be lacking insight and work experience, which I clearly didn’t.
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MarshmallowStars
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(Original post by LRxS)
Yeah well I guess I was given incorrect advice by my school or I just had more to say for myself than some applicants. I cut and cut and cut to be as concise as possible and I was damn proud of my final statement. I had some quite complex academic stuff to articulate and I needed all the characters I could get so forgive me if I didn’t care about having beautiful paragraphs. I’m sure admissions tutors appreciate paragraphs; I’ll bet they also like statements that are actually half decent.
Yeah, that’s basically what I ended up doing: no lines between paragraphs.

I’m sure admission tutors have read hundreds of ps that don’t have clear paragraphs. Yes, I can see the argument as to why you should have them but it is part of their job to read ps and therefore somewhat used to see both types of paragraphing.
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LRxS
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(Original post by MarshmallowStars)
Yeah, that’s basically what I ended up doing: no lines between paragraphs.

I’m sure admission tutors have read hundreds of ps that don’t have clear paragraphs. Yes, I can see the argument as to why you should have them but it is part of their job to read ps and therefore somewhat used to see both types of paragraphing.
Yeah exactly! And frankly not cutting 500 characters to put spaces in (which weren’t needed as my paragraphs were clear anyway) seemed the sensible decision.
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