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MaterialsJ
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Hi all, new to TSR.

I have worked very hard during my undergraduate studies in materials science and am now in a position to apply for postgraduate courses. My maths is very rusty, with many materials modules having only a very small mathematics content. My ambition for a long time now has been to pursue a career in nuclear fusion research, and feel that the Advanced Nuclear Engineering MSc at the Imperial College in London would provide the greatest exposure/foundation to working in this field. Can anybody comment on how difficult I should expect the maths to be? There are three modules that concern me most: "Reactor Physics", "Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics" and "Modelling for Nuclear Engineers" - as one would expect from such a course. I believe the course will be extremely challenging, but will be worth the hard work and dedication if I succeed. The course will likely be an automatic step-up in rigour and difficulty as I would be applying from Manchester Metropolitan University.

Thanks in advance to anyone who can offer sensible advice or share experiences.
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Smack
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(Original post by MaterialsJ)
My ambition for a long time now has been to pursue a career in nuclear fusion research, and feel that the Advanced Nuclear Engineering MSc at the Imperial College in London would provide the greatest exposure/foundation to working in this field.
Are you sure? I would have thought that nuclear fusion research is an area of physics rather than engineering, and hence that physics would be more useful if this is your aim.
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MaterialsJ
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Thanks for replying Pretty sure, the degree combines elements of chemical, material and mechanical engineering. I have a good grounding in materials and 2yrs' experience working in nuclear which continue to interest me. In future I hope to help create advanced fusion materials - straight off the bat, I can say confidently that my maths is nowhere near sharp enough to research plasma physics or astrophysics at postgrad level (however these are undoubtedly very interesting areas!). Materials (in addition to plasma physics challenges) are one of the aspects currently limiting viable fusion energy. The development of new materials is definitely more on the engineering side of things rather than the fundamental physics aspects. The degree would also hold the door open for conventional nuclear industries such as waste decommissioning, materials processing and fission power generation.
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Mostafizor
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(Original post by MaterialsJ)
Thanks for replying Pretty sure, the degree combines elements of chemical, material and mechanical engineering. I have a good grounding in materials and 2yrs' experience working in nuclear which continue to interest me. In future I hope to help create advanced fusion materials - straight off the bat, I can say confidently that my maths is nowhere near sharp enough to research plasma physics or astrophysics at postgrad level (however these are undoubtedly very interesting areas!). Materials (in addition to plasma physics challenges) are one of the aspects currently limiting viable fusion energy. The development of new materials is definitely more on the engineering side of things rather than the fundamental physics aspects. The degree would also hold the door open for conventional nuclear industries such as waste decommissioning, materials processing and fission power generation.
Hey, I'm considering applying for an MSc in nuclear engineering at Imperial. Did you end up applying for the course?
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MaterialsJ
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(Original post by Mostafizor)
Hey, I'm considering applying for an MSc in nuclear engineering at Imperial. Did you end up applying for the course?
Hey friend, yeah I applied. Get in touch privately if you want, if we end up going it would be good to have a familiar name/face in a city as big as London for sure!
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Karan0
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Hi,I’ve applied to Imperial for the same course, but I’m also considering Physics and Technology of Nuclear Reactors (PTNR) at the University of Birmingham. PTNR is also a very highly respected course, and would like to know your ideas about Advanced Nuclear Engineering at Imperial.
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Hisham Morsi
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Welcome )
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brianlhf
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Hey there, I’m also considering Physics and Technology of Nuclear Reactors (PTNR) at the University of Birmingham.
but what are you thoughts on the MSc Nuclear Science and Technology at the University of Manchester? I know it is conducted by NTEC tho~~
(Original post by Karan0)
Hi,I’ve applied to Imperial for the same course, but I’m also considering Physics and Technology of Nuclear Reactors (PTNR) at the University of Birmingham. PTNR is also a very highly respected course, and would like to know your ideas about Advanced Nuclear Engineering at Imperial.
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