A1renegade
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Hi everyone,

So I had my parents evening a few days ago and all my teachers are going on about revising for prelims and I'm not really sure where to start. If anyone could give me some advice that would be great.

My subjects:-
English
Maths
Chemistry
Physics
Computing
History
Music
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Consectatrix
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Hi,

What you should be doing most of all is past papers. They are available on the SQA website and some older papers that are unnavailable there are on other websites.

For maths and the sciences, you just have to practice, practice, practice. No use in re-writing notes, rather you should do exam style questions from past papers, and also look at the marking schemes (afterwards, obviously) to see where marks are allocated. Here are some good websites:

http://www.national5maths.co.uk/free...nal-5-maths-2/
https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/nl...nal-5-physics/
https://blogs.glowscotland.org.uk/nl...l-5-chemistry/

You can also use BBC Bitesize, and Scholar if your school has logins for pupils.

For English and your other essay based subjects, you'll want to write essay plans. What I did for English, was I'd look at past paper questions and write down essay plans for questions that fit my text. Quotes, pieces of analysis, comments etc. Always analyse and always refer back to your question, referencing theme and techniques. This is so that when it comes to the exam, if you have these plans fresh in your mind you can easily think back to what you wrote - it also furthers your understanding of the text.

For close reading, you could read newspapers or other articles and ask yourself why the writer has chosen a specific word/phrase/imagery; what are they trying to convey? What is their opinion on the matter? Why is this language effective? etc etc. It is a bit much but if you get into this mindset you'll be better at it during the exam. For the set text, try and nail your texts and memorise all the good quotes and what they mean. For the 8 marker question it'll be linking your texts together, so try and identify similair or contrasting themes/ideas/language. For our 6 poems we made tables that had headings for imagery, theme, symbolism etc. This could help in identifying how your texts link together.

I'm not so sure about history, music or computing, I didn't take music or computing, however I did do history and all I remember is again doing past paper questions and just familiarising myself with the course material. Don't forget important dates.

For studying in general, do not flood your time with studying constantly, but do not do the bare minimum either. Create a study schedule, with 30-50 minute study sessions every day. Take 10 minute breaks in between each session if you are doing more than one, which is advised. Doing a little bit everyday goes a long way, much better than cramming a week before your exam starts.

I am not sure about your school, but here we have after school study sessions or "supported study." Make sure you go to these if they are available. If you have time during lunch and your teachers let you, you can go into their classes and use that time to study or ask for help. That's another important thing, you can ask your teachers if they can potentially give you extra resources for studying.

I hope this was helpful. Good luck in your exams.
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A1renegade
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Thanks! That's very helpful!

Also, some of my friends have mentioned getting revision books, would that be a good idea to do? If I get them for all my subjects it ends up being pretty expensive so I don't want to buy them unless it's necessary.
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Consectatrix
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(Original post by A1renegade)
Thanks! That's very helpful!

Also, some of my friends have mentioned getting revision books, would that be a good idea to do? If I get them for all my subjects it ends up being pretty expensive so I don't want to buy them unless it's necessary.
I ended up buying some “How to Pass”
and some Leckie and Leckie books. The “How to Pass” ones are SQA endorsed i.e cover basically the whole course, however they are just designed for passing. I think the Leckie and Leckie books are much better because they go into greater detail.

You don’t have to buy all the books. Maybe prioritise over the subjects you find more difficult. In my experience the maths and science books are good because they provide examples and questions for you to try. I think in the “How to pass” books they have answers for these at the back but Leckie and Leckie books only have answers on their website. These books also have course/assessment information and give exam tips if you are interested in that.

Ultimately, if you feel you need them, depending on how well you’re doing, buy them. But if you don’t, then don’t. It is up to you.

You could ask your teachers if it is necessary. Some of my teachers actually have “How to Pass” books in their classrooms we can rent. They might be able to tell you if you should buy them or not.
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goldilocks12
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(Original post by A1renegade)
Hi everyone,

So I had my parents evening a few days ago and all my teachers are going on about revising for prelims and I'm not really sure where to start. If anyone could give me some advice that would be great.

My subjects:-
English
Maths
Chemistry
Physics
Computing
History
Music
The N5 music how to pass isn’t great but maths and chemistry are really great because they have practice questions and worked examples. The English one is only useful if the poems and texts you study are used in them to maybe check that looking in a shop or something
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