jazz_xox_
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I'll start with the development of new HIV treatments that can remove the viral gene from human DNA, having a positive effect on decreasing the number of HIV/AIDS deaths

0
reply
Asklepios
  • Study Helper
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by jazz_xox_)
I thought I'd make a thread to discuss recent medicine developments, please post any developments that you are interested in!!

I'll start with the development of new HIV treatments that can remove the viral gene from human DNA, decreasing the number of HIV/AIDS deaths significantly

I don't think you can claim a significant decrease in mortality rate from a treatment modality that is still experimental and hasn't been tested en masse!
0
reply
jazz_xox_
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Asklepios)
I don't think you can claim a significant decrease in mortality rate from a treatment modality that is still experimental and hasn't been tested en masse!
That is true, I read an article though that said there has been an 88% decrease in HIV/AIDS related deaths in the USA since the recent research? Not sure how accurate this is though
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by jazz_xox_)
That is true, I read an article though that said there has been an 88% decrease in HIV/AIDS related deaths in the USA since the recent research? Not sure how accurate this is though
I think this is generally. As Asklepios has said there is no way this drug would have reduced even 10 deaths (for now) - who knows in the future?

However, the research in HIV/AIDS treatment since the 1980s has undoubtedly saved many lives of people with HIV infection - especially through the use of HAART.
0
reply
Asklepios
  • Study Helper
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by jazz_xox_)
That is true, I read an article though that said there has been an 88% decrease in HIV/AIDS related deaths in the USA since the recent research? Not sure how accurate this is though
Which article?

If you can talk in detail about how CRISPR/Cas9 editing might work for 'curing' HIV, that's certainly impressive, but from what I understand, it hasn't progressed beyond clinical trials.
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by Asklepios)
Which article?

If you can talk in detail about how CRISPR/Cas9 editing might work for 'curing' HIV, that's certainly impressive, but from what I understand, it hasn't progressed beyond clinical trials.
I wouldn't know that and I'm interviewing!
0
reply
kokaled
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
Head Transplants by Dr. Frankenstein AKA an Italian neurosurgeon in China

jokes aside, I understand how controversial this topic is (I'm sure many would scoff at this in the comments) but nonetheless you have to admit something like this has massive potential
I've been following this for over a year now and personally have opinions on both sides of it
On the one hand 'Yaay' go cool science
On the other hand 'What is this guy, nuts?'

So basically I got the impression that it'll primarily be used to help millions of quadriplegics IF successful
There hasn't been much success in animal trials (pretty much no animal survived more than a year I believe) and this guy is planning on doing the first one on humans next month (unless the date has changed)
and even aside from the ethical dilemmas (which I'm not even going to touch) and I'm also going to leave the science for a second- How in the hell are they going to find a body, and if they do how will they just have a team of 120+ surgeons readily available, how is that even practical -but let's say they figured it all out- then what about the science there is very little success in the experiments on animals carried out- The main boundary appears to be getting the neurons in the spine to successfully join- Now this is the major barrier- Reattachments of one's own limbs is plausible but we're talking about attachment of A HEAD onto ANOTHER body- The drugs needed to suppress the immune response could practically kill the guy and then there is no guarantee that even if they somehow made neurons regenerate and bridge that gap that they would even attach properly

Also the argument could be made that humans are quite unlike mice (like 80% of mice trials are inapplicable to humans) and the procedure or consequences might be quite different in humans and that we won't know until we try, but how is such a procedure going to be justified in terms of cost (it's about 11 million euros or something- That money could be used to fund more promising alternatives (such as using organic fibers to aid neuron regeneration in spinal cord over site of injury or stem cells, etc.)

Overall it is quite theoretical as yet, but something like this does raise some interesting questions


search Sergio Canavero to find out more
1
reply
Asklepios
  • Study Helper
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by ecolier)
I wouldn't know that and I'm interviewing!
Which is exactly why it would be impressive!
0
reply
jazz_xox_
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by Asklepios)
Which article?

If you can talk in detail about how CRISPR/Cas9 editing might work for 'curing' HIV, that's certainly impressive, but from what I understand, it hasn't progressed beyond clinical trials.
I can't find it again now, I might have misinterpreted the statistics though.
Yes definitely, I've actually done quite a bit of research around this! Thanks for the suggestion
0
reply
ax12
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by kokaled)
Head Transplants by Dr. Frankenstein AKA an Italian neurosurgeon in China

jokes aside, I understand how controversial this topic is (I'm sure many would scoff at this in the comments) but nonetheless you have to admit something like this has massive potential
I've been following this for over a year now and personally have opinions on both sides of it
On the one hand 'Yaay' go cool science
On the other hand 'What is this guy, nuts?'

So basically I got the impression that it'll primarily be used to help millions of quadriplegics IF successful
There hasn't been much success in animal trials (pretty much no animal survived more than a year I believe) and this guy is planning on doing the first one on humans next month (unless the date has changed)
and even aside from the ethical dilemmas (which I'm not even going to touch) and I'm also going to leave the science for a second- How in the hell are they going to find a body, and if they do how will they just have a team of 120+ surgeons readily available, how is that even practical -but let's say they figured it all out- then what about the science there is very little success in the experiments on animals carried out- The main boundary appears to be getting the neurons in the spine to successfully join- Now this is the major barrier- Reattachments of one's own limbs is plausible but we're talking about attachment of A HEAD onto ANOTHER body- The drugs needed to suppress the immune response could practically kill the guy and then there is no guarantee that even if they somehow made neurons regenerate and bridge that gap that they would even attach properly

Also the argument could be made that humans are quite unlike mice (like 80% of mice trials are inapplicable to humans) and the procedure or consequences might be quite different in humans and that we won't know until we try, but how is such a procedure going to be justified in terms of cost (it's about 11 million euros or something- That money could be used to fund more promising alternatives (such as using organic fibers to aid neuron regeneration in spinal cord over site of injury or stem cells, etc.)

Overall it is quite theoretical as yet, but something like this does raise some interesting questions


search Sergio Canavero to find out more
For the head transplant to work they’re going to have to find a way to attach two totally severed spinal cords and repair them. I’d hope that if they are successful in this it will have an impact on the way we can manage spinal cord injuries anyway, and have a better success rate.

There was an article recently touting that the first head transplant was successful, explaining that someone (I assume him but may have been someone else) had successfully connected up the head of one cadaver to another. I don’t know how excited we can be about that as there’s a far greater challenge of getting everything working again!

I’d also be interested in the psychological impact this would have on someone. I can’t see someone not having a significant problem with having another person’s body...
1
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
(Original post by kokaled)
...
(Original post by ax12)
...
I don't see how it is scientifically possible, but then this is just me being a luddite I suppose. As kokaled said neurons are so hard to grow that we can't even help peripheral neuropathy (making a few tiny neurons grow a few mms) to help those with diabetes (amongst other causes) with pins and needles, so how are we going to get the whole spinal cord to grow out and join with a foreign spinal cord?! Maybe that is already a problem that's solved. [If it was, why don't we use them on quadraplegic patients first??]

This is just so much of a step advance that one cannot help but be very sceptical. It is like going to the next star system on a starship, when we haven't even been back to the moon (on a rocket) since 1972.

If anything, this scenario brings many interesting ethical issues as pointed out. Just because it is possible does it mean we should do it? Would the person who donated envisage their body being used it whatever way their new owner uses? Argh can't think of any more but I'm sure many will be out there.
1
reply
ax12
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
(Original post by ecolier)
I don't see how it is scientifically possible, but then this is just me being a luddite I suppose. As kokaled said neurons are so hard to grow that we can't even help peripheral neuropathy (making a few tiny neurons grow a few mms) to help those with diabetes (amongst other causes) with pins and needles, so how are we going to get the whole spinal cord to grow out and join with a foreign spinal cord?! Maybe that is already a problem that's solved. [If it was, why do we now use them on quadraplegic patients first??]

This is just so much of a step advance that one cannot help but be very sceptical. It is like going to the next star system on a starship, when we haven't even been back to the moon (on a rocket) since 1972.

If anything, this scenario brings many interesting ethical issues as pointed out. Just because it is possible does it mean we should do it? Would the person who donated envisage their body being used it whatever way their new owner uses? Argh can't think of any more but I'm sure many will be out there.
There has been some progress with transplanting interneurons into spinal cords to promote repair, so it’s not as ‘out there’ as it could be. I would argue that peripheral neuropathy would be more difficult to tackle than a single lesion in a spinal cord caused by sharp trauma.

I am also very sceptical, and even more so about whether we ‘should’ do it. I don’t think we can predict the effect it would have on someone, or whether if they start to reject it what you would do.
1
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 years ago
#13
(Original post by ax12)
...
There are simply too many things in the spinal cord that severing it and regrowing it is very much beyond the realms of possibility with current medical technology.

From https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3821155/, they mentioned repairing unmyelinated (for those in non-medical speak, conduction insulation) neurons can be shielded with PEG (propylene glycol). If this works why isn't this used in MS / NMO?

Plus there are lots of nerves in the neck that will need to be reconnected, they mentioned he vagus and phrenic nerves - it will be similarly hard to reconnect severed nerves. They are also whole organs that need to be connected (oesophagus, trachea plus others). It's just beyond my comprehension...
0
reply
Asklepios
  • Study Helper
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
Not to mention the immunology side of things too.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (11)
23.4%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (4)
8.51%
No I am happy with my choice (29)
61.7%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (3)
6.38%

Watched Threads

View All