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Little Tail Chaser
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VETERINARY MEDICINE PRACTICE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS



It's clear from the threads being created lately that some people feel slightly unprepared for upcoming interviews. Interview prep can be hard to get, especially if you're the first person in your school/family to apply to vet school, so to help level the playing field a bit I'll be posting practice questions for people to try if they like

I'll post a new question three times per week (...or less, depending how lazy I am), and when I post a new one I'll comment on people's answers to the previous question and maybe pick my favourite

Note that these do not apply to any particular vet school; they're just similar to what I experienced when I had my MMIs. In no way are these official or endorsed by any university, they come from a bored vet student on a train journey

Rules:
  • In many cases there are no right or wrong answers! The point of this is to help you come up with justifications for your views. By all means enter into discussion with people you disagree with.
  • Please post your answers in spoiler tags so that other people can get a chance to write down their thoughts before reading other people's answers.
  • At this point it's not a competition, so it's perfectly fine if you need to Google anything/do further research before you answer. Obviously at interview you may be presented with ideas you have no experience of, so it might be good practice to try without using the internet first. Maybe write out an answer first, then anything you want to add after doing more research can be typed in another colour.
  • Don't be shy - we'll get more out of this the more people contribute!


Current Question: Question 2 and 3

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Little Tail Chaser
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Question 1

This question looks at the treatment of animals in different parts of society and asks you to consider what is appropriate.

Look at the four pictures below. For each one, describe what you see, and state whether you think this is an acceptable treatment of animals, and for what reasons. Perhaps rank them in order of most acceptable to least acceptable.

Remember there are no right or wrong answers, I'm interested in what you have to say so don't be shy!

1.


2.

3.


4.
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frogs are cool x
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(Original post by Little Tail Chaser)





VETERINARY MEDICINE PRACTICE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS





It's clear from the threads being created lately that some people feel slightly unprepared for upcoming interviews. Interview prep can be hard to get, especially if you're the first person in your school/family to apply to vet school, so to help level the playing field a bit I'll be posting practice questions for people to try if they like

I'll post a new question three times per week (...or less, depending how lazy I am), and when I post a new one I'll comment on people's answers to the previous question and maybe pick my favourite

Note that these do not apply to any particular vet school; they're just similar to what I experienced when I had my MMIs. In no way are these official or endorsed by any university, they come from a bored vet student on a train journey


Rules:
  • In many cases there are no right or wrong answers! The point of this is to help you come up with justifications for your views. By all means enter into discussion with people you disagree with.
  • Please post your answers in spoiler tags so that other people can get a chance to write down their thoughts before reading other people's answers.
  • At this point it's not a competition, so it's perfectly fine if you need to Google anything/do further research before you answer. Obviously at interview you may be presented with ideas you have no experience of, so it might be good practice to try without using the internet first. Maybe write out an answer first, then anything you want to add after doing more research can be typed in another colour.
  • Don't be shy - we'll get more out of this the more people contribute!






Question 1

This question looks at the treatment of animals in different parts of society and asks you to consider what is appropriate.

Look at the four pictures below. For each one, describe what you see, and state whether you think this is an acceptable treatment of animals, and for what reasons. Perhaps rank them in order of most acceptable to least acceptable.

Remember there are no right or wrong answers, I'm interested in what you have to say so don't be shy!

1.


2.

3.


4.
I think this is a brilliant thread and don't want to leave it hanging so I'll give it a shot! Thanks LTC!

P.S. I've wrote a load of rubbish but oh well x

Spoiler:
Show


Order: (most acceptable to least)

Pic 2: It looks like the lab is a guide dog and is helping a blind person (holding a white cane). Labs are v. intelligent and enjoy socialisation w ppl and so being a guide dog means they're quite happy being trained n then working. Downside could be they won't have off-lead exercise running round the beach.

Pic 4: Cows are being milked. On farms cows are exposed to a lot of diseases quite frequently such as mastitis, can suffer from lameness etc. due to improper systems. Dairy cows also are separated from their calves after 1 day. This may cause stress. Dairy cattle are bred for ability of large milk production and so can express a lot of natural behaviours

Pic 3: lion shot dead and posed next to. Trophy hunting isn't entertaining at all: for the animal involved (or conservation).

Pic 1: I'm not sure what animal this is but it looks like it has been captured from the wild and (a part of it) is made into a product for consumption. Wild animals haven't been bred for human purposes and so being captured from the wild and presumably being kept in cages ??? might cause a lot of stress. Extraction (?) process might be painful too


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luberry
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(Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
Annnnd half my pictures didn't work Ok bear with :lol:
I still can't see picture 3 but not sure if that's just me? Guessing from eilidhhhh's answer it's some kind of trophy hunting picture? But would be very interested to know what picture 1 is in particular!
Great thread LTC
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beccasb4
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Thanks for starting this thread!! It looks like it'll be really helpful
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2) A Labrador doing guide dog training to help a blind person, they are moving through obstacles. This breed is very intelligent so they enjoy learning and they are cared for well so it's acceptable. 4) Dairy cows are being milked using machines. In some farms cows won't be cared for properly so in that case definitely unacceptable. Also separated very early on from their calves so the milk they produce can be used which is unfair and stressful for them both. Would be better if their was an alternative to this.1) (had to research more to find out what it was) These animals are used to partially digest coffee cherries to make a special type of expensive coffee. Would be acceptable if they were wild as the product could just be collected but the animal looks like it's in a cage and in a bad environment so unacceptable as can't show natural behaviour and the diet won't be good. The animals are solitary so keeping them with other animals is cruel. They're being exploited.3) A trophy hunter has shot and killed a lion and is posing with it. This is unacceptable as it is cruel and putting a vulnerable species in more danger. Lions should be protected not killed even if the trophy hunter paid money to shoot the lion as this money doesn't always go to conservation and it still doesn't make killing the lion right.
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animalmagic
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I can't see picture 3 either so you are not alone!


(Original post by luberry)
I still can't see picture 3 but not sure if that's just me? Guessing from eilidhhhh's answer it's some kind of trophy hunting picture? But would be very interested to know what picture 1 is in particular!
Great thread LTC
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Little Tail Chaser
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Gah, I fixed the pictures and then one of them went again. Sorry about that, it's back now! Yes it was trophy hunting.

Some good answers so far I'll make some comments and post a new question tomorrow :yep: Thanks for participating everyone!
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(Original post by beccasb4)
Thanks for starting this thread!! It looks like it'll be really helpful
Spoiler:
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2) A Labrador doing guide dog training to help a blind person, they are moving through obstacles. This breed is very intelligent so they enjoy learning and they are cared for well so it's acceptable. 4) Dairy cows are being milked using machines. In some farms cows won't be cared for properly so in that case definitely unacceptable. Also separated very early on from their calves so the milk they produce can be used which is unfair and stressful for them both. Would be better if their was an alternative to this.1) (had to research more to find out what it was) These animals are used to partially digest coffee cherries to make a special type of expensive coffee. Would be acceptable if they were wild as the product could just be collected but the animal looks like it's in a cage and in a bad environment so unacceptable as can't show natural behaviour and the diet won't be good. The animals are solitary so keeping them with other animals is cruel. They're being exploited.3) A trophy hunter has shot and killed a lion and is posing with it. This is unacceptable as it is cruel and putting a vulnerable species in more danger. Lions should be protected not killed even if the trophy hunter paid money to shoot the lion as this money doesn't always go to conservation and it still doesn't make killing the lion right.
Spoiler:
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I'll play devils advocate and say is the hunting of lions always wrong? What if their genetic merit is low, they are of low stature within the pride and a high price could be paid that would ensure that prides survival. Not saying I totally agree with this idea but for someone in an interview to say it does not mean they do either. Vet schools like to see well thought out answers that consider the other side with an open mind, not just what you think sounds right.
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beccasb4
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(Original post by VMD100)
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I'll play devils advocate and say is the hunting of lions always wrong? What if their genetic merit is low, they are of low stature within the pride and a high price could be paid that would ensure that prides survival. Not saying I totally agree with this idea but for someone in an interview to say it does not mean they do either. Vet schools like to see well thought out answers that consider the other side with an open mind, not just what you think sounds right.


Spoiler:
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I think if killing one lion would ensure the survival of a pride or would prevent bad genes from being passed on this would be more beneficial for conservation. But if this happened the lion shouldn't be used as a trophy like the lion in the picture as this sends the wrong message. It should be done by people who want to help the whole pride not just someone who wants a trophy.

Thanks for replying, it's good to see a different side to it!!

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(Original post by eilidhhhh)
I think this is a brilliant thread and don't want to leave it hanging so I'll give it a shot! Thanks LTC!

P.S. I've wrote a load of rubbish but oh well x

Spoiler:
Show




Order: (most acceptable to least)

Pic 2: It looks like the lab is a guide dog and is helping a blind person (holding a white cane). Labs are v. intelligent and enjoy socialisation w ppl and so being a guide dog means they're quite happy being trained n then working. Downside could be they won't have off-lead exercise running round the beach.

Pic 4: Cows are being milked. On farms cows are exposed to a lot of diseases quite frequently such as mastitis, can suffer from lameness etc. due to improper systems. Dairy cows also are separated from their calves after 1 day. This may cause stress. Dairy cattle are bred for ability of large milk production and so can express a lot of natural behaviours

Pic 3: lion shot dead and posed next to. Trophy hunting isn't entertaining at all: for the animal involved (or conservation).

Pic 1: I'm not sure what animal this is but it looks like it has been captured from the wild and (a part of it) is made into a product for consumption. Wild animals haven't been bred for human purposes and so being captured from the wild and presumably being kept in cages ??? might cause a lot of stress. Extraction (?) process might be painful too




Not answering question but saying what I think pic 1 is, it's under spoiler tags anyway just in case I don't want to ruin it for someone!

Spoiler:
Show


I believe pic 1 is a palm civet, which are used to make a really expensive coffee as the coffee beans are eaten and apparently come out the other end tasting really nice, although I'll take their word for that thanks! The coffee beans were taken from faeces of wild civets but as the demand for the coffee increases they're being caught and essentially being farmed for it, battery hen style...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_palm_civet

They had them at the zoo I helped at, and they're very interesting little predators, and would quite happily try and take a chunk out of you according to the owner so definitely no cuddles with those guys. If you stood next to the enclosure and took photos of one, the other would creep around the edge and climb the fence to try and sneak up on you...


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frogs are cool x
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(Original post by laurakyna)
Not answering question but saying what I think pic 1 is, it's under spoiler tags anyway just in case I don't want to ruin it for someone!

Spoiler:
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I believe pic 1 is a palm civet, which are used to make a really expensive coffee as the coffee beans are eaten and apparently come out the other end tasting really nice, although I'll take their word for that thanks! The coffee beans were taken from faeces of wild civets but as the demand for the coffee increases they're being caught and essentially being farmed for it, battery hen style...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_palm_civet

They had them at the zoo I helped at, and they're very interesting little predators, and would quite happily try and take a chunk out of you according to the owner so definitely no cuddles with those guys. If you stood next to the enclosure and took photos of one, the other would creep around the edge and climb the fence to try and sneak up on you...



Aw that's really interesting, thanks sm !!
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Little Tail Chaser
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QUESTION 1 SUMMARY

Apologies for the late update, here's my thoughts....

Spoiler:
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1.
As a couple of you identified, this is indeed a civet. They're fed coffee cherries but cannot digest the coffee beans, which are collected undigested from civet poop

At face value this seems fairly harmless, and arguably more acceptable than say, eating meat or consuming other animal products as it does not involve killing the civets or methods of harvest that would be considered harmful/painful. The issues would therefore arise from husbandry procedures:
- Usually farmed civets are kept in kept in Asia, where civets are native to (I am certainly not aware of any civet farms in the UK). Counties outside of the UK (and EU) may tend to have more relaxed animal welfare laws with much less regulation on farms.
- Cages may be unsuitable; not big enough and not providing enough enrichment.
- Civets are naturally solitary animals, so keeping them in close proximity to each other is likely to be very stressful and disease may spread quickly.
- Nutrition is likely inadequate as they are fed so many coffee cherries. Other farmed animals (e.g. cows) are fed to maintain condition and maximise production, but many of these species have been farmed for millennia and more is known of their nutritional needs. Farming civets is relatively new and maintaining good health of the animals is not a priority.

2. Again as many people pointed out, this is a guide dog. It looks like it's in training.

As has been said, dogs are intelligent and guide dogs seem to respond well to training and cope well with their role. Puppies are selected so that only the most suitable animals are used, and socialised very well so that they develop into calm and confident adults. For the most part the dogs are pets as well as an assistant for the person they guide, and the bond between owner and dog is likely very strong.

The main welfare concerns would arise from the inability for the dogs to carry out all of its natural behaviors. Wearing a harness etc is unnatural (which doesn't equate to bad!), but there may be limited ability for the animals to get more vigorous exercise than just walking (potentially a problem especially as labs are prone to obesity), or to interact with other dogs.

3. This is a trophy hunter posting in front of a dead lion.

This is potentially the image that people will find most shocking. It is common for people to not understand why anybody would want to participate in such a thing; taking life away from a wild animal for no reason other than to stuff its head and hang it on a wall.

As has been pointed out, trophy hunting is actually a useful conservation tool. Habitat loss and poaching are bigger threats to endangered species than trophy hunting is, and the revenue generated from hunting can be used to address these problems. The money can be used to fund reserves, and employ wardens. These will be people from the local community, which will encourage people to engage in protecting native species and potentially alleviate some of the financial stress for farmers. If predators attack livestock then farmers may be less keen to get involved with conservation, but employing people can help to foster interest/a motive to protect animals from poachers, and provide an alternate income so that land used for farming can be reduced.

If hunts are correctly regulated, only specific individuals can be chosen, for example those too old to breed/with low genetic merit, or those that have a history of killing other members of its species. It is also worth considering the fact a shot from a skilled marksman should be able to kill an animal very quickly, minimising the amount of suffering.

The downside to a lot of this is that it relies on programs being managed properly; and unfortunately corruption may be a factor, especially for unstable governments. It is also important to note that trophy hunting may not even be done legally and through the correct channels in the first place; hunts can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars so it is no surprise that some people will try and do it on the cheap. Finally there is the possibility of causing severe and prolonged suffering and distress, for example if the hunter doesn't put the shot in the correct place to kill the animal quickly.

4.
This is a cow being milked at a dairy farm. I won't go into huge detail with this as I would imagine that people are very familiar with dairy farming practices, but some positive and negative points to consider:

Positive:
- Welfare of farmed animals is potentially better than for farmed animals than for wild animals as they are given food, shelter and their heath problems can be addressed.
- Cows have been selectively bred for a high milk yield. This may make having a full udder uncomfortable however milking will reduce this.
- Cows are fed in a way to keep them in good condition and maximise milk yield.
- Although some people may not agree with the process of AI, this can help maintain genetic diversity within a herd and avoids physical damage that can occur when the bull mounts a cow.
- Similarly people may find disbudding an unpleasant procedure, however this helps to reduce fighting within the herd and lowers risk of injury.

Negative:
- Calves are taken away from their mothers soon after birth, which may be distressing to both.
- Mastitis is common, which can be painful and represents a welfare concern.
- Lameness is also common, which is another welfare concern.
- Cows are culled when their milk production drops, which may be well before the end of their natural lifespan.



In my personal option, I would rank these in order of acceptability: 2, 3, 4, 1, but that is by no means the 'correct answer' and I have been very interested to hear your views! Thank you so much for participating (all points are still up for discussion if you would like to continue!), I'll put the next question up soon!





Spoiler:
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(Original post by eilidhhhh)
x
(Original post by luberry)
x
(Original post by beccasb4)
x
(Original post by animalmagic)
x
(Original post by VMD100)
x
(Original post by laurakyna)
x



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Little Tail Chaser
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QUESTION 2

You are a vet working in a smallies practice. Mr. Fiver has bought in his rabbit, Bigwig, to see you. After an examination, you decide that Bigwig needs some drugs, but there are some steps you need to take before you can prescribe them.


First, you need to figure out how much Bigwig weighs. Thanks to Mr. Trump's regime, the entire world has recently adopted the imperial system again. Bigwig weighs 5.5lbs, how much is this in kg? (1.00kg = 2.20lbs)



Now that you know the weight to use, you consult a formulary to find out how much of the drug to give. You decide on the totally real and not made up drug Fakeicillin, for which the suggested dose is 50mg/kg twice per day. How much Fakeicillin should be given at each administration?



You decide to give the drug in the form of an oral suspension, which can be given by the owner at home. The product you decide to use, Notrealamox, contains 30mg of Fakeicillin per ml of solution. What volume needs to be given at each administration?



You tell Mr. Fiver that he needs to treat Bigwig for ten days, which he agrees to. Notrealamox comes in 50ml and 100ml bottles. Which of these is the more suitable product to prescribe?



BONUS QUESTION :awesome:
The 100% legit and real drug Fakeicillin is of course perfectly safe for Mr. Fiver's imaginary rabbit, but suggest why you would have to be very careful with giving oral antibiotics to rabbits.






Appreciate that this one is a lot less wordy than the last so will get answers for this up much quicker :yep: Remember to put your answers in spoiler tags!
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Little Tail Chaser
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^^^ The above question can be answered quickly, and I am not in the habit of letting you guys off lightly, so have another question....

QUESTION 3

You are the owner and head vet of a large animal practice. You employ multiple vets in addition to a couple of receptionists. While the practice has generally been quite successful, with more and more farms closing nearby you are starting to struggle to make ends meet, to the point where you are seriously considering having to lay off a member of staff.

One day one of the other vets comes back from pregnancy diagnosing at a large dairy farm and complains about how they were treated by a client. Later that day, you receive a call from the client, demanding that they don't want to see a 'vet like that' again (for the sake of the scenario say it was something sexist/racist/bigoted in some way). The client says that if you do not comply with their wishes, they will take their business elsewhere. You have absolute trust in your employee, who although has been graduated for only a few years has shown a very high level of competence in their work, but you cannot afford to lose such a regular client.

What do you do in this situation?
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luberry
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1. First, you need to figure out how much Bigwig weighs. Thanks to Mr. Trump's regime, the entire world has recently adopted the imperial system again. Bigwig weighs 5.5lbs, how much is this in kg? (1.00kg = 2.20lbs)

Spoiler:
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Bigwig = 2.5kg (1kg = 2.2lbs, so 0.5kg = 1.1lbs then x5 for 5.5lbs = 2.5kg)


2. Now that you know the weight to use, you consult a formulary to find out how much of the drug to give. You decide on the totally real and not made up drug Fakeicillin, for which the suggested dose is 50mg/kg twice per day. How much Fakeicillin should be given at each administration?

Spoiler:
Show

50mg/kg so 50 x 2.5 = 125mg for Bigwig


3. You decide to give the drug in the form of an oral suspension, which can be given by the owner at home. The product you decide to use, Notrealamox, contains 30mg of Fakeicillin per ml of solution. What volume needs to be given at each administration?

Spoiler:
Show

125/30 = 4.167ml, or 4.2ml (not 100% sure on this one, especially as it really upset my calculator for some reason )


4. You tell Mr. Fiver that he needs to treat Bigwig for ten days, which he agrees to. Notrealamox comes in 50ml and 100ml bottles. Which of these is the more suitable product to prescribe?

Spoiler:
Show

100ml, because 4.2 twice a day = 8.4ml then for 10 days = 84ml so bigger bottle it is.


BONUS QUESTION :awesome:
The 100% legit and real drug Fakeicillin is of course perfectly safe for Mr. Fiver's imaginary rabbit, but suggest why you would have to be very careful with giving oral antibiotics to rabbits.

Thanks LTC!!

Spoiler:
Show

Rabbits have quite unusual (and sensitive) digestive systems which are inhabited by a variety of essential microorganisms which work together to digest food. Some antibiotics can affect intestinal flora by killing beneficial bacteria, which allows resident pathogenic bacteria - no longer limited by competition from normal intestinal bacteria - to flourish and become more numerous very quickly. Some pathogenic bacteria can then produce toxins, which may go on to kill the rabbit. Obviously not a good outcome for anyone involved, hence the care needed when prescribing oral antibiotics to our fluffy friends

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Angry cucumber
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I'm going to play devils advocate and bounce things off some of these replies

Hi both, see my reply

(Original post by eilidhhhh)
I think this is a brilliant thread and don't want to leave it hanging so I'll give it a shot! Thanks LTC!

P.S. I've wrote a load of rubbish but oh well x

Spoiler:
Show




Order: (most acceptable to least)

Pic 2: It looks like the lab is a guide dog and is helping a blind person (holding a white cane). Labs are v. intelligent and enjoy socialisation w ppl and so being a guide dog means they're quite happy being trained n then working. Downside could be they won't have off-lead exercise running round the beach.

Pic 4: Cows are being milked. On farms cows are exposed to a lot of diseases quite frequently such as mastitis, can suffer from lameness etc. due to improper systems. Dairy cows also are separated from their calves after 1 day. This may cause stress. Dairy cattle are bred for ability of large milk production and so can express a lot of natural behaviours

Pic 3: lion shot dead and posed next to. Trophy hunting isn't entertaining at all: for the animal involved (or conservation).

Pic 1: I'm not sure what animal this is but it looks like it has been captured from the wild and (a part of it) is made into a product for consumption. Wild animals haven't been bred for human purposes and so being captured from the wild and presumably being kept in cages ??? might cause a lot of stress. Extraction (?) process might be painful too




(Original post by beccasb4)
Thanks for starting this thread!! It looks like it'll be really helpful
Spoiler:
Show

2) A Labrador doing guide dog training to help a blind person, they are moving through obstacles. This breed is very intelligent so they enjoy learning and they are cared for well so it's acceptable. 4) Dairy cows are being milked using machines. In some farms cows won't be cared for properly so in that case definitely unacceptable. Also separated very early on from their calves so the milk they produce can be used which is unfair and stressful for them both. Would be better if their was an alternative to this.1) (had to research more to find out what it was) These animals are used to partially digest coffee cherries to make a special type of expensive coffee. Would be acceptable if they were wild as the product could just be collected but the animal looks like it's in a cage and in a bad environment so unacceptable as can't show natural behaviour and the diet won't be good. The animals are solitary so keeping them with other animals is cruel. They're being exploited.3) A trophy hunter has shot and killed a lion and is posing with it. This is unacceptable as it is cruel and putting a vulnerable species in more danger. Lions should be protected not killed even if the trophy hunter paid money to shoot the lion as this money doesn't always go to conservation and it still doesn't make killing the lion right.

Spoiler:
Show

Pic 2 - But they are constantly working, always have to be on alert for their owner, this is surely very tiring and means limited down time - is this fair?

Pic 4 - Why are calves taken away at a day old?
Are dairy cows the most unethical form of farming? Do you think all cases of lameness etc are unacceptable?

pic 3 - Is there any valid argument for trophy hunting in africa?

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mollyo123
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Weight
5.5/2.2 = 2.5kg
Amount of drug to give
2.5 x 50 = 125mg
Volume at each administration
125/30 = 4.2ml
For ten days
4.2 x 10 = 42ml
Twice per day
42 x 2 = 84ml
So a 100ml bottle would be best

(after doing a bit of reading) Rabbits depend on bacteria living in their bowels for digestion, some antibiotics can wipe out these bacteria and undesirable bacteria can start to grow. They can produce toxins in the bowels and ultimately can kill the rabbit.
Injectable antibiotics should be used where possible but oral antibiotics can be given in yoghurt to replenish the bacteria.
Rabbits are also anatomically unable to vomit, so what is given to a rabbit must be digestible.


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kittyschaffer
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(Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
^^^ The above question can be answered quickly, and I am not in the habit of letting you guys off lightly, so have another question....

QUESTION 3

You are the owner and head vet of a large animal practice. You employ multiple vets in addition to a couple of receptionists. While the practice has generally been quite successful, with more and more farms closing nearby you are starting to struggle to make ends meet, to the point where you are seriously considering having to lay off a member of staff.

One day one of the other vets comes back from pregnancy diagnosing at a large dairy farm and complains about how they were treated by a client. Later that day, you receive a call from the client, demanding that they don't want to see a 'vet like that' again (for the sake of the scenario say it was something sexist/racist/bigoted in some way). The client says that if you do not comply with their wishes, they will take their business elsewhere. You have absolute trust in your employee, who although has been graduated for only a few years has shown a very high level of competence in their work, but you cannot afford to lose such a regular client.

What do you do in this situation?
I am going to take a stab at this one:

The first thing I would want to do is ask my employee what happened at the farm from her perspective and what she thinks went wrong. I would also want to ask her why she felt she was treated wrongly and what she thinks could be done to resolve the situation.

I would then want to call the farmer and ask him what happened from his perspective, what he thinks went wrong, why he thinks it went wrong, and what he thinks could be done to fix the situation.

By talking to both parties and getting their perspectives, I could asses what happened at the farm and a possible resolution for the issue. Perhaps there was a simple misunderstanding that can be easily worked out.

If the problem is more complex however, I would want to ask the farmer if he would be comfortable with another vet coming to the farm, and I would want to make sure the previous vet is alright with this as well, as I wouldn't want to cause her to feel like her job was being threatened. Alternatively, I could suggest having the previous vet come back to the farm with supervision from me so I could observe what was going on. If this was decided upon, I would of course want to make sure my employee was comfortable with this decision as I want to make sure she feels comfortable and safe at work.

If we could not come to a resolution with the farmer and the my employee continued to feel abused, I would have to discontinue our working relationship with this farmer. While I have a responsibility for the financial well-being for my clinic, my first priority is protecting my employees and making sure they have a safe work environment.
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VictiniCup
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#19
Can someone check my answers for Q2

1) 2.34 kg
2) 117 mg
3) 3.9ml
4) 100ml
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ewecrazy?
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#20
(Original post by VictiniCup)
Can someone check my answers for Q2

1) 2.34 kg
2) 117 mg
3) 3.9ml
4) 100ml
I got (along with a couple of others on this thread):
1) 2.5kg
2) 125mg
3) 4.2ml
4) 100ml

If you look at the spoilers on other peoples posts on here, they take you through how they got to these answers too if you're confused.
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