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More than half of English students fail to get 5 Cs at GCSEs watch

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    (Original post by bright star)
    a change of heart from mr education-is-for-the-elite?
    Considering you couldnt even read 'more lower class pupils', in the other thread- i dont think you can mock me.

    How is it a change of heart? I say a degree should be studied by those who are good enough and not only academic-wannabes should get five A*-C's...... two completely different statements!?
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    (Original post by love2learn7)
    Considering you couldnt even read 'more lower class pupils', in the other thread- i dont think you can mock me.

    How is it a change of heart? I say a degree should be studied by those who are good enough and not only academic-wannabes should get five A*-C's...... two completely different statements!?
    excuse me. i think you need to read what i wrote over there again.
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    The problem is obvious, isn't it? People don't want to study for their GCSEs. At least for the most part. Blame the parents, it's all their fault.
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    (Original post by love2learn7)
    So only people who want to be academics need to obtain 5x A*-C's?

    The idea was that this shows most of our country is thick.
    That's not really what I meant. What I am saying is that people who want to go into a vocational career such as being a bricky/plumber/sparky etc and are quite sure of this early on in their lives probably do not want to spennd their time couped up ion classes learnign somehting that is for them un-needed.

    I'm not quite sure what your point is here?!? It doesn't show most of our country is thick... It shows that a certain amount of students aren't achieving an arbitary standard.
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    You ever feel as though you're banging your head against a brick wall? You can talk as much sense as you want to these people, but they don't seem to want to listen. Not everyone is academic, not everyone can sit exams, and not everyone fails there exams just because they're 'thick'. This isn't a reflection of our educative system necessarily, but a number of different factors..... But if they're too ignorant to see that, that's their problem. Good luck getting through life with such a horrid attitude, I wonder how far your 5 GCSEs will get you when you're nothing but an ignorant pig.
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    Oh and I still love the way that the (quite valid) points I made earlier on in this thread have gone unanswered. The people arguing (particularly the person who started the thread) seem to ignore whatever suits them in order to give their argument more basis. How many GCSEs do you need to learn the ability to form a good, substantive argument I wonder???
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    You ever feel as though you're banging your head against a brick wall? You can talk as much sense as you want to these people, but they don't seem to want to listen. Not everyone is academic, not everyone can sit exams, and not everyone fails there exams just because they're 'thick'. This isn't a reflection of our educative system necessarily, but a number of different factors..... But if they're too ignorant to see that, that's their problem. Good luck getting through life with such a horrid attitude, I wonder how far your 5 GCSEs will get you when you're nothing but an ignorant pig.
    great. what an insightful analysis of this social problem, and what we can do to remedy it.


    i'm a little depressed at the number of people on here repeating the argument that this quite gigantic failing of our education system doesn't matter because, apparently, most of these people will never directly apply what their learning in their future occupations. do none of you see the merit in thorough, universal education? Idealism aside, a strong economic argument can be made for it.
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    (Original post by made_of_fail)
    great. what an insightful analysis of this social problem, and what we can do to remedy it.


    i'm a little depressed at the number of people on here repeating the argument that this quite gigantic failing of our education system doesn't matter because, apparently, most of these people will never directly apply what their learning in their future occupations. do none of you see the merit in thorough, universal education? Idealism aside, a strong economic argument can be made for it.


    I'm really at the end of it with regards to this argument. I've tried to make 'valid' points, and they seem to just get ignored by the OP, so I'm sick of trying to get through to him...

    And I never once said it didn't matter. I just said that there might be a number of reasons for people not attaining 5 GCSEs, not just flaws in the educative system. That isn't suggesting that our system is perfect, but that it's not the sole reason for failure. Perhaps if you had read my posts properly you would have realised this.
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    (Original post by Jurisprude)
    That's not really what I meant. What I am saying is that people who want to go into a vocational career such as being a bricky/plumber/sparky etc and are quite sure of this early on in their lives probably do not want to spennd their time couped up ion classes learnign somehting that is for them un-needed.

    I'm not quite sure what your point is here?!? It doesn't show most of our country is thick... It shows that a certain amount of students aren't achieving an arbitary standard.
    C grade = average. Therefore if you cannot attain 5 'averages' at GCSE you are subsequently not 'average' on the whole, therefore 'below average' and therefore 'thick'.

    Understand the point now?
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    (Original post by made_of_fail)
    great. what an insightful analysis of this social problem, and what we can do to remedy it.


    i'm a little depressed at the number of people on here repeating the argument that this quite gigantic failing of our education system doesn't matter because, apparently, most of these people will never directly apply what their learning in their future occupations. do none of you see the merit in thorough, universal education? Idealism aside, a strong economic argument can be made for it.
    We dont usually agreee m_o_f but i am fully behind you here. I dont want everyone being a rocket scientist but its worrying when half of our country cannot muster 'average' on GCSE Maths and English.
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    (Original post by doggyfizzel)
    IMO, if you didn't get 5 A*-C grades you just didn't try. Maybe you tried for the last two years but you can't have tried for 5 years. If you say you did then your lying. Even if you really struggle if you listen you would get a C, without even having to do revision, any grade above that shows you revised hard or you have a talent in that area, or both. So after drawing that conclusion i couldn't care less about these people, less competition at uni. It will be their problem when they relalise that if someones going to employ someone with no qualifications it's goin to be a polish person.
    Thanks very much for that. It's not my fault my school employed teachers who couldn't teach and thought it was a great idea to have mixed ability classes for Science.

    therefore 'below average' and therefore 'thick'.
    Because of course, it's never the teachers' fault, is it?
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    Thanks very much for that. It's not my fault my school employed teachers who couldn't teach and thought it was a great idea to have mixed ability classes for Science.



    Because of course, it's never the teachers' fault, is it?
    You think you need a teacher to get a C grade in exams which are a complete joke? Did you not want to do well for yourself and do something extra at home?

    Did you have rubbish teachers for 5 years then, in every subject?
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    (Original post by love2learn7)
    You think you need a teacher to get a C grade in exams which are a complete joke?
    Well, yes.

    Did you not want to do well for yourself and do something extra at home?
    I always worked at home and would always ask a friend of mine for help if I was struggling with something and was unable to talk to the teacher for whatever reason.

    Did you have rubbish teachers for 5 years then, in every subject?
    The only decent teachers I had were the maths teachers.
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    Well, yes.



    I always worked at home and would always ask a friend of mine for help if I was struggling with something and was unable to talk to the teacher for whatever reason.



    The only decent teachers I had were the maths teachers.
    Were the teachers rubbish or did you have disruptive pupils in your classes?
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    A bit of both really, apart from Maths. (Where I did get a C, but missed half of Year 10 due to changing sets)
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    A bit of both really, apart from Maths. (Where I did get a C, but missed half of Year 10 due to changing sets)
    What type of school did you go to?

    What grade of student would you say you were upon entering secondary, ie was you a bright primary school pupil?

    Just curious- nothing personal against you
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    (Original post by love2learn7)
    C grade = average. Therefore if you cannot attain 5 'averages' at GCSE you are subsequently not 'average' on the whole, therefore 'below average' and therefore 'thick'.

    Understand the point now?
    I didn't get 5 GCSE's A-C at 16. Am I thick now? Oh good glad you told me, could of been quite embarrassing. Saves me wasting my time studying, what was I thinking!
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    (Original post by Sidhe)
    I didn't get 5 GCSE's A-C at 16. Am I thick now? Oh good glad you told me, could of been quite embarrassing. Saves me wasting my time studying, what was I thinking!
    you say 'at 16', did you retake them or something?
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    I don't think it matters I just despair when people see GCSE's as some sort of intelligence test, there could be all sorts of reasons why you would do poorly, just saying they're thick was a pointless generalisation.
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    (Original post by love2learn7)
    What type of school did you go to?
    I went to the local state school.

    What grade of student would you say you were upon entering secondary, ie was you a bright primary school pupil?
    I was quite bright.
 
 
 
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