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    When you fill in stuff for DLA, ase it on your worst possible day. Get (if you have one) your consultant to write a cover letter for you.
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    I did have a consultant, but because it's one of those illnesses where nothing can be done, I don't see one.
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    Same here. I have appoitmants just to see how things are getting on and what can be done to help e.g. support at school- I have seen her since I was 2!
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    Can u get ur GP to write you a letter?
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    I'm not sure. I've only seen them once because of the side effects of my illness. (neck pain)
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    I'm not sure. I've only seen them once because of the side effects of my illness. (neck pain)
    My impairments are also stable, and I don't really see my GP about them unless I have something secondary (like pain). However, my GP has always been quite understanding and happy to write letters. For my DLA appeal she practically wrote what I asked her to in the letter! At bhas.org.uk there are some guides to DLA, including appeals. If you open the relevant guide (probably the adult DLA physicial health guide) there is a page which gives you a sheet to take to your GP. It explains what's important to write, and a bit about why DLa is important. It's also got little blank boxes for you to fill in about the relevant sections on the DLA form, to jog your GP's memory. GP's often don't know (or think) about how things effect you day to day. For example, my impairment means that if I move my head while I am walking, I fall over. My GP knew this, but hadn't figured out that it meant I couldn't cross roads safely (if fact, I've fallen in the road twice). When I filled in the little box about 'help outside' and put 'need help crossing roads' she was happy to write a letter saying that ... sometimes they appreciate a pointer.
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    And I've been turned around yet again. I'm wondering whether I'm really wasting my time trying. Yet, I need the money to buy equipment (like reactions lens, which are at least £49) to help me out.
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    Right, then you have a limited time to appeal, see a Welfare Officer and appeal. Plenty of people win on appeal
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    Just after they sent me the letter telling I'm not entitled to anything, they sent out a letter saying I am entitled to something. :confused:
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    That is strange, how long is your award for?
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    Both are for indefinite periods.
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    See what appears in your bank account then, if you get it paid then great. If not, take the letter that says you ARE entitled to the DWP.
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    Got a lump sum on Tuesday.
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    That'll be your back payment, think your set then
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    It is really annoying when this sort of thing happens, I suppose its a way of trying to make sure that not everyone can get this money.

    When I was in Year 9 at High School, I got told that I was on the same level as everyone else so I didn't need extra help (something that my father was angry about). When I got to university, the learning advisor was surprised at that since she could clearly see that I did need it and now I do get it.
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    (Original post by Dude)
    It is really annoying when this sort of thing happens, I suppose its a way of trying to make sure that not everyone can get this money..
    Someone said that to me before, I think. It's rubbish really - the people who really need it don't get it, yet people who don't need it, do get it.
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    (Original post by Titch89)
    Someone said that to me before, I think. It's rubbish really - the people who really need it don't get it, yet people who don't need it, do get it.
    Its the system I'm afriad. There are people who claim to be dyslexic, purposely fail the test just so they can get a free laptop, it happens.

    I've always wondered as well how diabetes can mean you get a free laptop.
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    you've just gotta milk it for everything it's worth. literally. the tiniest things make all the difference and the more detail you put in the more likely they are to accept it.

    you must have something else as well as congenital nystagmus. i've got that and don't tend to get neck pain. don't know anyone else with the same condition that does either. go lay into your GP.
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    (Original post by simple_things)
    you must have something else as well as congenital nystagmus.
    I only have a squint. Whether or not the two are related I really don't know.

    i've got that and don't tend to get neck pain. don't know anyone else with the same condition that does eithe.
    The neck pain is related to the head tilt.
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    Erm your claiming for a squint??
    I have one aswell - but i dont understand why you would need to claim for one!
 
 
 
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