SBizzy
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So today I had an English lit test Act 4 scene 3 on macbeth. I never revised for it, and I didn't do enough paragraphs. I'm really upset I want to move up. Ps: I was;t able to revise because I revised for science could someone help. I got 15/20 in my last assessment.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by SBizzy)
So today I had an English lit test Act 4 scene 3 on macbeth. I never revised for it, and I didn't do enough paragraphs. I'm really upset I want to move up. Ps: I was;t able to revise because I revised for science could someone help. I got 15/20 in my last assessment.

What sort of help do you need? Can you be a bit more specific?
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SBizzy
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
What sort of help do you need? Can you be a bit more specific?
Writing detailed paragraph's and understanding the text. Today I just rushed my test and I know I never did well.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by SBizzy)
Writing detailed paragraph's and understanding the text. Today I just rushed my test and I know I never did well.
That's not surprising if you didn't revise, as you said in your original post.
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SBizzy
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
That's not surprising if you didn't revise, as you said in your original post.
I know, I still need some help..
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by SBizzy)
I know, I still need some help..
Well, I got A* in English literature GCSE and then A-level, so I'm happy to help if I can.

Can you post a paragraph from one of your essays? I'll see if I can give you a few pointers.
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SBizzy
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Well, I got A* in English literature GCSE and then A-level, so I'm happy to help if I can.

Can you post a paragraph from one of your essays? I'll see if I can give you a few pointers.
Ahh I don't have my book with me, should've told my teacher I never finished. Anyway would you be able to advise me on structuring grade 7-8 paragraphs.
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zoe2002
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did you do christmas carol or romeo and juliet if so what question was it ? xoxo
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SBizzy
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(Original post by mayu123)
did you do christmas carol or romeo and juliet if so what question was it ? xoxo
I'm doing Macbeth, and The first section A) How does Shakespare present the relationship with Macduff and Malcolm?

Section b) Was something like. How is Kingship important… Basically about kingship Can't remember all of the question.
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peace01
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Well, I got A* in English literature GCSE and then A-level, so I'm happy to help if I can.

Can you post a paragraph from one of your essays? I'll see if I can give you a few pointers.
Hey! I was wondering what all things does one need to include in their answers to get an A* in literature. I am doing IGCSE. My works are:
1) Plays- Inherit the Wind by J. Lawrence and Robert E. Lee and A view from the Bridge by Arthur Miller
2) Songs of Ourselves – Volume 2, Part 1 (Love and Family)
3) Spies by Michael Frayn.
I'm hoping to see a reply soon as my preboards start from the 4th of December... Thanks!
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by peace01)
Hey! I was wondering what all things does one need to include in their answers to get an A* in literature. I am doing IGCSE. My works are:
1) Plays- Inherit the Wind by J. Lawrence and Robert E. Lee and A view from the Bridge by Arthur Miller
2) Songs of Ourselves – Volume 2, Part 1 (Love and Family)
3) Spies by Michael Frayn.
I'm hoping to see a reply soon as my preboards start from the 4th of December... Thanks!

As I said above, that is too vague a question to answer. If you want me to help you, post a paragraph you have written and I will tell you how you can improve it.
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peace01
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
As I said above, that is too vague a question to answer. If you want me to help you, post a paragraph you have written and I will tell you how you can improve it.
I'm sorry but I don't understand what you are asking from me.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by peace01)
I'm sorry but I don't understand what you are asking from me.
I presume you've been writing essays for your English teacher?

Just copy and paste a paragraph from one of your essays into this thread and I'll suggest how you can improve it.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I presume you've been writing essays for your English teacher?

Just copy and paste a paragraph from one of your essays into this thread and I'll suggest how you can improve it.
Would you minded if I copy and pasted one of my essays as well? Also, just an approximate grade for the quality. I have this essay here: I got a 4c-like a very very very low C when I normally am about a B, I got an 8a/8b in my mock in Language!


Act 1 Scene 3-Macbeth’s Reactions to the witches’ predictions

At the beginning of Act 1 Scene 3 it is expressed to the audience how Macbeth will become Thane of Cawdor, as predicted by the witches through the use of the spell-like speech (which incidentally becomes two prophesies) that read: “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee Thane of Cawdor...All hail, Macbeth-that shalt be king hereafter”.From Macbeth’s body language (as suggested by Banquo) the audience learns how Macbeth was startled by the prophecy delivered by the witches, Banquo describes: “...why do you start and seem to fear things that do sound so fair” which not only implies how taken aback Macbeth was by this prophecy, but also how Macbeth was morally denying the idea of becoming king as it would only be possible if King Duncan was killed. However, whilst the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he believes that it is not fair to declare just yet that he will become king, Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and states “why do you dress me in borrowed robes”, the concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating King Duncan by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him.

I'm just stuck how to answer the questions and what I need to do, is historical context important?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by ohdearstudying)
Would you minded if I copy and pasted one of my essays as well? Also, just an approximate grade for the quality. I have this essay here: I got a 4c-like a very very very low C when I normally am about a B, I got an 8a/8b in my mock in Language!


Act 1 Scene 3-Macbeth’s Reactions to the witches’ predictions

At the beginning of Act 1 Scene 3 it is expressed to the audience how Macbeth will become Thane of Cawdor, as predicted by the witches through the use of the spell-like speech (which incidentally becomes two prophesies) that read: “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee Thane of Cawdor...All hail, Macbeth-that shalt be king hereafter”.From Macbeth’s body language (as suggested by Banquo) the audience learns how Macbeth was startled by the prophecy delivered by the witches, Banquo describes: “...why do you start and seem to fear things that do sound so fair” which not only implies how taken aback Macbeth was by this prophecy, but also how Macbeth was morally denying the idea of becoming king as it would only be possible if King Duncan was killed. However, whilst the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he believes that it is not fair to declare just yet that he will become king, Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and states “why do you dress me in borrowed robes”, the concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating King Duncan by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him.

I'm just stuck how to answer the questions and what I need to do, is historical context important?
I don't know how the new GCSE grading system works, but when I was doing my GCSEs, we were told that historical context would really please the examiner, but it wasn't essential. That may have changed however.

I think the problem with this this paragraph is that you don't have anywhere near enough language analysis. The attempts at analysis you make are too vague and not focused on th language. You need instead to find quotes with alliteration, assonance, listing effects, hyperbole etc, and comment on their effects.

Also, your writing style is not the most coherent - I had to read some of your sentences several times understand what you were talking about.
It's not helped by your incorrect grammar. For example, your last sentence is WAY too long and just so wrong grammatically; you also keep repeating phrases you've already used within a sentence.

"However, whilst the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he believes that it is not fair to declare just yet that he will become king, Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and states “why do you dress me in borrowed robes”, the concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating King Duncan by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him. "

This should be multiple sentences (I've rewritten them slightly). You have just put commas between them - you can speak like that, but you can't write that way.

1) However, while the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he doesn't believe it is fair to declare yet that he will.
> FULL STOP NOT COMMA; this is a complete sentence
> Don't repeat 'becoming/become king within a few words of each other; there is no need.

2) Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and ASKS, "why do you dress me in borrowed robes”.
> It's a question - you don't state a question, you ask a question

3) The concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating him
> "by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him." - this is literally the definition of 'impersonating'. It's not needed here. Plus, you've already used the phrase 'wearing his robes' within this sentence - you can't say it again.
> Say 'him' instead of repeating 'King Duncan'

Based on this paragraph, I would definitely give this essay a C grade.
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ohdearstudying
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I don't know how the new GCSE grading system works, but when I was doing my GCSEs, we were told that historical context would really please the examiner, but it wasn't essential. That may have changed however.

I think the problem with this this paragraph is that you don't have anywhere near enough language analysis. The attempts at analysis you make are too vague and not focused on th language. You need instead to find quotes with alliteration, assonance, listing effects, hyperbole etc, and comment on their effects.

Also, your writing style is not the most coherent - I had to read some of your sentences several times understand what you were talking about.
It's not helped by your incorrect grammar. For example, your last sentence is WAY too long and just so wrong grammatically; you also keep repeating phrases you've already used within a sentence.

"However, whilst the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he believes that it is not fair to declare just yet that he will become king, Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and states “why do you dress me in borrowed robes”, the concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating King Duncan by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him. "

This should be multiple sentences (I've rewritten them slightly). You have just put commas between them - you can speak like that, but you can't write that way.

1) However, while the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he doesn't believe it is fair to declare yet that he will.
> FULL STOP NOT COMMA; this is a complete sentence
> Don't repeat 'becoming/become king within a few words of each other; there is no need.

2) Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and ASKS, "why do you dress me in borrowed robes”.
> It's a question - you don't state a question, you ask a question

3) The concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating him
> "by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him." - this is literally the definition of 'impersonating'. It's not needed here. Plus, you've already used the phrase 'wearing his robes' within this sentence - you can't say it again.
> Say 'him' instead of repeating 'King Duncan'

Based on this paragraph, I would definitely give this essay a C grade.
Thank you so much for your response, reading back I understand there is far too much repetition. I think I may benefit from understanding how to use punctuation more effectively. You see, I'm so used to saying "state" from English Language as there are very rarely questions or rhetorical devices used.

Also, just looking at AQA's spec, it says "Showing understand of relationships between text and the context they were written" is worth ~15% of your overall grade. May I ask whether you studied Macbeth?

I am not aware of the literary devices, that's the issue. I only know the relatively simple ones for language. How should I learn them? I have a big issue with comma splicing, I thought I had gotten better!

Would you mind if I sent you a PM?
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SBizzy
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I don't know how the new GCSE grading system works, but when I was doing my GCSEs, we were told that historical context would really please the examiner, but it wasn't essential. That may have changed however.

I think the problem with this this paragraph is that you don't have anywhere near enough language analysis. The attempts at analysis you make are too vague and not focused on th language. You need instead to find quotes with alliteration, assonance, listing effects, hyperbole etc, and comment on their effects.

Also, your writing style is not the most coherent - I had to read some of your sentences several times understand what you were talking about.
It's not helped by your incorrect grammar. For example, your last sentence is WAY too long and just so wrong grammatically; you also keep repeating phrases you've already used within a sentence.

"However, whilst the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he believes that it is not fair to declare just yet that he will become king, Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and states “why do you dress me in borrowed robes”, the concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating King Duncan by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him. "

This should be multiple sentences (I've rewritten them slightly). You have just put commas between them - you can speak like that, but you can't write that way.

1) However, while the idea of becoming king does interest Macbeth, he doesn't believe it is fair to declare yet that he will.
> FULL STOP NOT COMMA; this is a complete sentence
> Don't repeat 'becoming/become king within a few words of each other; there is no need.

2) Macbeth questions the reasoning behind the prediction of him becoming king and ASKS, "why do you dress me in borrowed robes”.
> It's a question - you don't state a question, you ask a question

3) The concept of Macbeth undressing King Duncan and wearing his robes suggests Macbeth feels he would be impersonating him
> "by wearing his “robes” but not actually being him." - this is literally the definition of 'impersonating'. It's not needed here. Plus, you've already used the phrase 'wearing his robes' within this sentence - you can't say it again.
> Say 'him' instead of repeating 'King Duncan'

Based on this paragraph, I would definitely give this essay a C grade.
What would be an a grade?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by SBizzy)
What would be an a grade?
Better grammar & better language analysis.
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