12doeb
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I’m wanting to do a Biomedical science degree with the intention of going on to be a haematologist within the NHS.

I’m trying to find good courses around the UK that are accredited with IBMS and also the NHS.

Notts Trent is my nearest Uni that does the course and after looking at the spec, it seems a really nice course compared to others I have looked at.

I am also looking at Sheffield Hallam and Aberdeen.

Anyone else who is doing / looking into doing the course found any really good courses they can recommend?

The one at Trent has an integrated masters year, which is really nice.
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artful_lounger
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Haematologists are doctors who have specialised in that area and thus requires a medical degree. You can work in Haematology as a healthcare scientist through the NHS however, which I believe is what you intended. The two are not the same though.

Nomenclature aside, TraineeBMS might be able to offer some advice - I believe there is a distinction between the BMS and HCS routes, and I have a suspicion the latter may be more applicable. I've also requested this be moved to a more relevant forum than chat so you can get some more discussion hopefully
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Cyborg Ninja
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What sort of predictions have you got or grades you already have (so people probs don’t suggest very high grade need unis)?

I’m in the point where I’ve got to be 100% clear on my final 5 now.
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RegisteredBMS
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So by the fact you mention BSc Biomedical Science I assume that, as previously mentioned, you mean a Biomedical Scientist working in Haematology. As mentioned, a Haematologist is a medical doctor working closely with the haematology laboratory.

I would suggest that you look at BSc Healtcare Science (Life Science). You will get guaranteed placements and graduate with HCPC registration. It is the only course that graduates with registration. Your first year placement is a rotational placement. This means that you get experience of various disciplines and allows you to make an informed decision in regards to where your placement will be during Year 2 and 3, whether that be Haematology or the other disciplines. If you choose Haematology, bare in mind it falls under the Blood Science's bracket and that you will have to study Biochemistry, Transfusion Science and some immunology too. Most labs require their Haematology BMS' to work in Transfusion too and some are recruiting generic Blood Science's BMS' working in Biochemistry, Haematology and Transfusion.

http://www.nshcs.hee.nhs.uk/ptp-join...sity-providers

There is a list of Healthcare Science providers. The Life Science ones are Genetics, Blood Science, Infection Science and Cellular Science.
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12doeb
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While the PTP is a viable option and I have asked for more information on it. I have noticed that none of the unis I want to go to do the programme.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by 12doeb)
While the PTP is a viable option and I have asked for more information on it. I have noticed that none of the unis I want to go to do the programme.
Surely employability is the key factor when choosing your university?!

What else do you need to know about the PTP?
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cxrwl
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I have just received an unconditional for Biomedical Sciences (Developmental Biology) with Industrial Placement at Aberdeen University. I also applied to four medical schools so essentially this is my back up, but the course sounds so interesting it’s putting doubt into my mind about doing medicine! I choose Aberdeen mainly because you do a year long placement in fourth year which not only provides you with valuable work experience which will look really good on CV, you will also graduate with a Msci instead of a Bsc. I also like that you can choose a specific discipline to study from third year onwards. Besides, Aberdeen is a great city for university students, not too big so it’s not as expensive as other places but still plenty to do🙂
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12doeb
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What type of course it is (part time/full time, pure degree/apprenticeship/traineeships?
Entry requirements? Besides going into a lab at NHS what would a Bsc in health (blood) science allow me to do? The website says look at UCAS for more information, but I can’t find it on the UCAS website.

If I were to apply and do rotational placements, would they be able to put me in local hospitals or would they send me nationwide ?
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by 12doeb)
What type of course it is (part time/full time, pure degree/apprenticeship/traineeships?
Entry requirements? Besides going into a lab at NHS what would a Bsc in health (blood) science allow me to do? The website says look at UCAS for more information, but I can’t find it on the UCAS website.

If I were to apply and do rotational placements, would they be able to put me in local hospitals or would they send me nationwide ?
The course is like most other full-time courses. There is a part time version. Some Universities do it slightly differently to others, but here was my experience of it. Up until Year 3, the modules were EXACTLY the same as the Biomedical Science students bar the professional practice module. In Year 3 we specialised. We also had placements during the first 2 summers of the course. In Year 3 we were on placement 4 days a week and in University the rest. It was hectic, busy etc. but worth it.

Contrary to popular belief, the course doesn't mean that you can only be an NHS BMS. Graduates have mostly gone down that route but people have also gone on to courses such as Physician's Associate, Medicine, research etc. What I would say though is that if you don't intend to be a NHS BMS then it's a waste of a limited position on the course.

They do take into account your preference for placements but obviously everyone may want a certain area, but it is largely regional. They will consider who drives etc. I drove and was sent 40 miles away but some that didn't drive were sent to the same city. 40 miles away seems a long way away but it was only an hour drive due to a good amount of motorways in this area.
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