Help for Music: Baroque Period!

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hakuchan15
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#1
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#1
Sooo let me get to the point: How do the features of a fugue and gigue are typical of a piece from the Baroque Period? I kind of need it ASAP, and I’m currently studying Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 5

Thank you!
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maisiex10x
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#2
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#2
I'm studying that at the moment do you like it? Are you year 10? Let me look at my notes I will get back to you ASAP, are you enjoying GCSE music?
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maisiex10x
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#3
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#3
FUGUE-a musical form compromising an exposition middle, section, end section, always contrapuntal.-In my score I have written an example of fugal melody is a bar 25 in e major.

GIGUE-I cant find any notes about this sorry!
Hope this helps!
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hakuchan15
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#4
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#4
(Original post by maisiex10x)
FUGUE-a musical form compromising an exposition middle, section, end section, always contrapuntal.-In my score I have written an example of fugal melody is a bar 25 in e major.

GIGUE-I cant find any notes about this sorry!
Hope this helps!
Nope, I’m in year 11. Revising so hard and I have music exam on Monday!!! Thank you I just needed some info!
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Beth_H
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#5
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#5
A fugue is typical of the Baroque because it revolves around counterpoint (polyphonic textures where different melodic lines form harmonies with one another but can still be identified as distinct 'voices'). Complex polyphonic textures based on a set of 'rules' or principles about the use of harmony and voice leading (the movement of the melody) are very common in Baroque music. The harmony is generally built around relatively simple chords in root position or first inversion, and there is a series of modulations to closely related keys, particularly the dominant. The use of ornamentation in melodies is also a typical Baroque feature.

A gigue is typical of the Baroque in that it's based on a dance form - at that time, a lot of music which wasn't written for the Church was composed either to accompany dances or, more commonly, using the forms of dance music, but not intended for actually dancing to. You can probably identify a lot of typical Baroque features in a gigue (largely diatonic harmony, modulation to related keys, contrapuntal texture, use of binary or rounded binary form, ornamentation etc.). Baroque gigues will usually be part of a suite of dances, often towards the end.

Incidentally, a lot of Bach's gigues actually open with a fugal section, so the two do cross over a bit.
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hakuchan15
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Beth_H)
A fugue is typical of the Baroque because it revolves around counterpoint (polyphonic textures where different melodic lines form harmonies with one another but can still be identified as distinct 'voices'). Complex polyphonic textures based on a set of 'rules' or principles about the use of harmony and voice leading (the movement of the melody) are very common in Baroque music. The harmony is generally built around relatively simple chords in root position or first inversion, and there is a series of modulations to closely related keys, particularly the dominant. The use of ornamentation in melodies is also a typical Baroque feature.

A gigue is typical of the Baroque in that it's based on a dance form - at that time, a lot of music which wasn't written for the Church was composed either to accompany dances or, more commonly, using the forms of dance music, but not intended for actually dancing to. You can probably identify a lot of typical Baroque features in a gigue (largely diatonic harmony, modulation to related keys, contrapuntal texture, use of binary or rounded binary form, ornamentation etc.). Baroque gigues will usually be part of a suite of dances, often towards the end.

Incidentally, a lot of Bach's gigues actually open with a fugal section, so the two do cross over a bit.
THANK you so much! X
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Beth_H
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#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by hakuchan15)
THANK you so much! X
No problem, hope that was what you were looking for.
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