Turn on thread page Beta

Postgraduate Students - Has living been a struggle? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys,

    I'm wondering how easy/hard it's been for you guys to live. Rent, bills, travel etc.

    At the moment I work 25hrs/wk and rent a house with my partner,
    It's been pretty manageable between the two of us but the commute to work is driving me up the wall.

    Recently I've been considering moving to a zero-hour contract that would be located much closer but I'm unsure about the lack of financial security.

    I ask as I'd just like your own experiences of how manageable, or unmanageable, things are.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Sykeology)
    Hi guys,

    I'm wondering how easy/hard it's been for you guys to live. Rent, bills, travel etc.

    At the moment I work 25hrs/wk and rent a house with my partner,
    It's been pretty manageable between the two of us but the commute to work is driving me up the wall.

    Recently I've been considering moving to a zero-hour contract that would be located much closer but I'm unsure about the lack of financial security.

    I ask as I'd just like your own experiences of how manageable, or unmanageable, things are.
    Moved to the postgrad support forum

    Commuting can drive anyone up the wall but it's about finding that balance between the finance, commute and being with your partner as they too have a career presumably.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    OK now I've managed to get some PhD funding, but last year wasn't great. 10K PG loan plus a tuition fee scholarship, I was comfortable but often quite hard-up in one of the cheaper towns in the UK, and worked to supplement my income. Add running a car/commuting, or higher living costs, into that mix and I can imagine it would have been rather tight.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    No, as I worked a very well-paying job full-time for two years after my undergraduate degree (which was free) and accumulated significant savings before doing my postgraduate degree - like everyone else should do. Whoever does their PG degree right after their UG degree hasn't really understood how the whole higher education system is designed and just puts an unnecessary strain on their finances.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    No, as I worked a very well-paying job full-time for two years after my undergraduate degree (which was free) and accumulated significant savings before doing my postgraduate degree - like everyone else should do. Whoever does their PG degree right after their UG degree hasn't really understood how the whole higher education system is designed and just puts an unnecessary strain on their finances.
    How very nice for you - but seriously, what a ridiculously arrogant and ignorant thing to say.

    The vast majority of people in this country don't have access to free undergraduate education, nor - realistically - to 'very well-paying' full-time jobs straight out of university. Nice that things worked out for you, but to impose that standard of social assistance and achievement on everyone else is completely pie-in-the-sky - it sounds like you're the one who doesn't understand the reality of most people's lives, financial situations, or the labour market.

    I would not contest that PG degrees can be really poor financial decisions if people don't have a good reason for doing them, or significant savings or help backing them up. However, they can also open doors for professional careers that are otherwise closed off.

    Crikey, every time I read your post it gets more and more obnoxious. Genial my arse.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by worldender)
    The vast majority of people in this country don't have access to free undergraduate education, nor - realistically - to 'very well-paying' full-time jobs straight out of university.
    Thanks for further strengthening my argument for working for a couple of years (or even more than that) before doing your postgraduate degree. Not paying off that UG debt before doing a PG degree is indeed pretty stupid.

    The vast majority of Brits enters the labor market with only an UG degree and not few enter into very well-paying jobs (London's strong financial services sector being just one example) so my case surely isn't as exotic as you make it out to be.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    No, as I worked a very well-paying job full-time for two years after my undergraduate degree (which was free) and accumulated significant savings before doing my postgraduate degree - like everyone else should do. Whoever does their PG degree right after their UG degree hasn't really understood how the whole higher education system is designed and just puts an unnecessary strain on their finances.
    Well, good for you, but we don't all have the luxury of getting a well paid job straight out of uni. In order for me to get a decent job in the field my degree is in, I need a master's, which is why I'm currently studying for one, funnily enough. I spent over a year working two minimum wage jobs - 50 hours a week - to save up for my master's and still had to take a loan out and guess what? I'm still struggling and having to work as much as I can to get by.

    Just because you were able to doesn't mean everyone else can.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    Well, good for you, but we don't all have the luxury of getting a well paid job straight out of uni.
    You mean you didn't have the grades, hard and soft skills, maturity, and eloquence to get one?

    Again, the vast majority of British graduates enters the job market with only an UG degree and not few secure well-paying job.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    You mean you didn't have the grades, hard and soft skills, maturity, and eloquence to get one?

    Again, the vast majority of British graduates enters the job market with only an UG degree and not few secure well-paying job.
    Wow...

    Obviously I didn't get bad grades as I wouldn't have got accepted onto a master's if I did. And like I said in my previous post, in order for me to get a good job in my field, I need a master's. 90% required a master's, the rest wanted several years experience in the field, which I didn't have. What part of that do you not understand? If I don't have the qualifications required, then I'm not going to get the job, whether I'm mature or not.

    Where are you getting this statistic?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    Obviously I didn't get bad grades as I wouldn't have got accepted onto a master's if I did.
    Firstly, 'not getting bad grades' and getting very good grades that earn you a well-paying job with only an undergraduate degree are two very different things. Secondly, work experience can still get you into a good PG course if you had bad grades at UG.

    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    And like I said in my previous post, in order for me to get a good job in my field, I need a master's. 90% required a master's, the rest wanted several years experience in the field, which I didn't have. What part of that do you not understand? If I don't have the qualifications required, then I'm not going to get the job, whether I'm mature or not.
    Anecdotal, hardly relevant for the vast majority of students. With a great UG degree and internships you surely would have still gotten into your field.

    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    Where are you getting this statistic?
    Common knowledge, but if you need numbers...

    In 2011/12 (latest numbers I could find without investing too much time) there were 1,928,140 students enrolled in undergraduate courses and 568,505 in postgraduate courses.
    Assuming that these numbers and the ratio are relatively stable (which they are, but of course they won't be once Brexit bites which will be pretty catastrophic for the British education system), this means AT LEAST 1.4m students enter the job market every year with only an undergraduate degree, PLUS those who do it right and first work before doing their Masters (which is still the vast majority of UG students).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    Firstly, 'not getting bad grades' and getting very good grades that earn you a well-paying job with only an undergraduate degree are two very different things. Secondly, work experience can still get you into a good PG course if you had bad grades at UG.



    Anecdotal, hardly relevant for the vast majority of students. With a great UG degree and internships you surely would have still gotten into your field.



    Common knowledge, but if you need numbers...

    In 2011/12 (latest numbers I could find without investing too much time) there were 1,928,140 students enrolled in undergraduate courses and 568,505 in postgraduate courses.
    Assuming that these numbers and the ratio are relatively stable (which they are, but of course they won't be once Brexit bites which will be pretty catastrophic for the British education system), this means AT LEAST 1.4m students enter the job market every year with only an undergraduate degree, PLUS those who do it right and first work before doing their Masters (which is still the vast majority of UG students).
    For all your feigned elegance and eloquence, you didn't learn a shred about decency.

    You're aware you're trying to big-up yourself, and you're aware you're talking with condescension - you've literally riddled your threads and posts that way. There's no need for that and you're generating no more recognition here than if you were an unemployed, school drop out. You're trying too hard to be seen as something when no one cares about that stuff.

    Don't drag your 10 seconds of Google information into this. If you want to bring statistics, use salary bands. Use duration of how long it takes to reach £X salary after graduating. Use demographic information etc.
    What you brought to the table there is close to irrelevant, much akin to the majority of what you've replied to this thread.
    We get it, you think you're good at antagonising people and making yourself feel of value. Well done you.

    Your entire response could have been summed up with "No, it's not. I worked a bit before it so it made coping easier afterwards." but you had to try and paint yourself as some high-class snob.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    Firstly, 'not getting bad grades' and getting very good grades that earn you a well-paying job with only an undergraduate degree are two very different things. Secondly, work experience can still get you into a good PG course if you had bad grades at UG.



    Anecdotal, hardly relevant for the vast majority of students. With a great UG degree and internships you surely would have still gotten into your field.



    Common knowledge, but if you need numbers...

    In 2011/12 (latest numbers I could find without investing too much time) there were 1,928,140 students enrolled in undergraduate courses and 568,505 in postgraduate courses.
    Assuming that these numbers and the ratio are relatively stable (which they are, but of course they won't be once Brexit bites which will be pretty catastrophic for the British education system), this means AT LEAST 1.4m students enter the job market every year with only an undergraduate degree, PLUS those who do it right and first work before doing their Masters (which is still the vast majority of UG students).
    Yes, some courses do accept you on the course with bad grades if you have relevant work experience, but in my post I said later on that I don't have experience. I did get good grades, but like I keep saying... It wasn't enough to get a well paid job.

    Your statistic was literally just a figure of how many students are enrolled onto a UG course in the UK. That tells me nothing about getting a well paid job after graduating, how common it is, how long it takes on average. So, again, I ask, where are you getting this statistic? Also 'common knowledge' doesn't count as a credible source...
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sykeology)
    For all your feigned elegance and eloquence, you didn't learn a shred about decency.

    You're aware you're trying to big-up yourself, and you're aware you're talking with condescension - you've literally riddled your threads and posts that way. There's no need for that and you're generating no more recognition here than if you were an unemployed, school drop out. You're trying too hard to be seen as something when no one cares about that stuff.
    It's ok, you know nothing about the subject and can't make a single point so you need to attack me personally, we get it. Very decent of you!

    (Original post by Sykeology)
    Don't drag your 10 seconds of Google information into this. If you want to bring statistics, use salary bands. Use duration of how long it takes to reach £X salary after graduating. Use demographic information etc.
    The statistics I quoted are of course correct but I only brought them in since a poster specifically asked about it - of course you missed that and look like a fool now.

    The value of working in between undergraduate and postgraduate degree is not only of quantitative but of qualitative nature - the joy of applying what you learned, the joy of returning to academia after being out in the professional world, how much more you get out of the postgrad degree having worked before...

    But please do feel free to bring in all this information you name to make your case - oh, you don't have it? Yeah, that's what I thought.

    (Original post by Sykeology)
    What you brought to the table there is close to irrelevant, much akin to the majority of what you've replied to this thread.
    Ditto!

    (Original post by Sykeology)
    Your entire response could have been summed up with "No, it's not. I worked a bit before it so it made coping easier afterwards." but you had to try and paint yourself as some high-class snob.
    No, I just understood how the education system works and am more successful than most people. Be bitter about it all you want because you most likely did it wrong and are an underachiever, it won't change a thing.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    Yes, some courses do accept you on the course with bad grades if you have relevant work experience, but in my post I said later on that I don't have experience. I did get good grades, but like I keep saying... It wasn't enough to get a well paid job.
    Well, that speaks volumes then about your lack of hard and soft skills, experience, performance in interviews, etc. Way to underline just what a hopeless case you are.

    (Original post by glitterglaive)
    Your statistic was literally just a figure of how many students are enrolled onto a UG course in the UK. That tells me nothing about getting a well paid job after graduating, how common it is, how long it takes on average. So, again, I ask, where are you getting this statistic? Also 'common knowledge' doesn't count as a credible source...
    Read my previous post again, you seem to be a bit slow upstairs. The large differential between enrolled UG and PG students shows how the vast majority of undergraduate students manage to find a job with just an undergraduate degree just fine, and not few find a very well-paying one (look at investment banking and management consulting starting salaries).
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    Read my previous post again, you seem to be a bit slow upstairs. The large differential between enrolled UG and PG students shows how the vast majority of undergraduate students manage to find a job with just an undergraduate degree just fine, and not few find a very well-paying one (look at investment banking and management consulting starting salaries).
    You are the nastiest person I have ever come across on TSR. I bet you spit on homeless people and tell them they've "done life wrong". You're just a bully. And an ill-informed one at that. You have absolutely no knowledge about the people you are insulting or the professions they are trying to get into. I think you are the one that is incredibly uneducated - your masters can't teach you how to be a decent person who can understand and relate to other people. God knows how you got a job with absolutely zero people skills.
    Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GenialGermanGent)
    Well, that speaks volumes then about your lack of hard and soft skills, experience, performance in interviews, etc. Way to underline just what a hopeless case you are.



    Read my previous post again, you seem to be a bit slow upstairs. The large differential between enrolled UG and PG students shows how the vast majority of undergraduate students manage to find a job with just an undergraduate degree just fine, and not few find a very well-paying one (look at investment banking and management consulting starting salaries).
    My, my. This German ticks all the usual boxes. I suspect he's one of those Germans that believes running a budget surplus is beneficial to the Fatherland and its Volk. It's not. I'm sure he believes that when a country runs into economic difficulties there is no other option available other than austerity, as do most of his Teutonic compatriots. Ever heard of John Maynard Keynes? Perhaps inform your comrades that even Hayek's approach is a viable option. Their permissive attitude towards granting mammoth amounts of money to Southern Europe in order to perpetuate the German Empire's plan in Europe is explained by the great Oswald Spengler. Offering a damning indictment of the German peoples, Spengler wrote that Germans are like 'hyper-active boy scouts', desiring to expound their socialist views on all within reach. Nietzsche famously detested his Fatherland.

    Carry on using fiat money as a determiner of a successful life, like the rest of your country.

    Your 'uber-mensch' performance in the job market and real world has clearly been incredible. That's why you spend your precious free time patrolling forums in an effort to feel superior.

    P.S, your English is not as great as you think it is, native speaker or not.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MaximusLeviticus)
    My, my. This German ticks all the usual boxes. I suspect he's one of those Germans that believes running a budget surplus is beneficial to the Fatherland and its Volk. It's not. I'm sure he believes that when a country runs into economic difficulties there is no other option available other than austerity, as do most of his Teutonic compatriots. Ever heard of John Maynard Keynes? Perhaps inform your comrades that even Hayek's approach is a viable option. Their permissive attitude towards granting mammoth amounts of money to Southern Europe in order to perpetuate the German Empire's plan in Europe is explained by the great Oswald Spengler. Offering a damning indictment of the German peoples, Spengler wrote that Germans are like 'hyper-active boy scouts', desiring to expound their socialist views on all within reach. Nietzsche famously detested his Fatherland.
    Uh, ok. Massively irrelevant to this thread and full of false assumptions. Glad you wasted your time on typing this germanophobe rubbish.

    (Original post by MaximusLeviticus)
    Your 'uber-mensch' performance in the job market and real world has clearly been incredible. That's why you spend your precious free time patrolling forums in an effort to feel superior.
    Uber-mensch? Your words, not mine. You seem worryingly familiar with nazi terminology. Another uneducated, xenophobic Leave voter, perhaps? Anyway, I am delegating most things to my team these days, frees up time to have fun in forums. Work hard and maybe, just maybe, you'll get where I am one day - massively doubt it though, given by the asinine drivel you write.

    (Original post by MaximusLeviticus)
    P.S, your English is not as great as you think it is, native speaker or not.
    P.S.: Learn how to use P.S.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sykeology)
    Hi guys,

    I'm wondering how easy/hard it's been for you guys to live. Rent, bills, travel etc.

    At the moment I work 25hrs/wk and rent a house with my partner,
    It's been pretty manageable between the two of us but the commute to work is driving me up the wall.

    Recently I've been considering moving to a zero-hour contract that would be located much closer but I'm unsure about the lack of financial security.

    I ask as I'd just like your own experiences of how manageable, or unmanageable, things are.

    Anyway, back to the original question. I personally would not take a zero hours contract because I would panic at the prospect of not getting any hours. I like to know exactly what is coming in each month so it is one less thing to worry about. You will have enough on your plate with the course, never-mind if you employer tells you they don't need you for 2 weeks, or you only get a handful of hours and you don't make the rent.

    It is also incredibly stressful on partners, people forget this. My boyfriend was supportive of me leaving work to pursue my masters...or at least he thought he would be, and honestly wanted to be. However he didn't really realise what he was signing up for and that I would essentially become his dependent. I saw that the financial pressure was getting on top of him being the main breadwinner, so I got a job in the end. I got a full time job actually - I do not recommend that. I was/am eager to climb the ladder quickly, so I took this option but would not do it again. It does look good on the CV though!

    Another poster did mention bar work - it is the best for flexibility and you can swap shifts in order to get a social life, colleagues are usually more than willing to take turns doing weekends because everyone is in the same boat.

    MaximusLeviticus. I would advise in future when making a point not to mention nationality or race. It is a cheap shot that overshadows an otherwise articulate point. Racism/anti-nationalism is a lazy mans game and is beneath you. You also have no actual evidence that GenialGermanGent is actually German. I could have French in my username, that does not necessarily make me French.

    That being said, GenialGermanGent - You should revise your people skills, your aggression is not necessary. It is a shame, as you could have gotten both your point and intelligence across without insulting everyone. You could have helped many people here asking the same questions. Instead your words are lost among the bile, you must be an unhappy person (at least you sound it) and I hope that you find some way to be happier and less of an aggressor. I am also sorry to say that your statistics do not match your argument. Simply listing the number of students there are in the UK is no evidence of what they are doing after Uni. Not enrolling on a masters degree is not an indication that the students have gotten great jobs instead. Many students are doing their masters because great jobs demand it. Some students try for a while and give up and settle for what they can get. A lot leave the country because of this.

    You are also bad at taking insults - don't dish it out if you can't take it!
 
 
 

2,402

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.