username2692395
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I have one recently, and want to try it again, but I have no clue how. Also, I don't get much sleep at night, will this reduce my chances?
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Medifield
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When I was younger, I used to lucid dream (LD) a lot. This trailed off as I became an adult due to being more present with daily experiences such as work.

Lucid dreaming requires a little mental preparation on your part. We spend time taking advantage of being awake without ever questioning if we are alseep. Let me ask you, how are you so sure this is not a dream?

The above question comes from a method called, reality checking. This tests your awareness. Without awareness you will not lucid dream. The idea is to test every so often during the day if you are dreaming or not, when this becomes habit the sub-conscious mind will translate this into the dreamworld. Google can supply more on this topic.

You must have minimum 8 hours sleep. If you are too tired, then you will fall into deep sleep too quickly and miss LDing. The idea is to catch yourself at certain times during the sleep cycle. Approximately, every 90 minutes you change sleep cycle and after 3-4 hours of sleeping one enters Rapid Eye Movement (REM) the dreaming state. About 2-3 hours after REM is Non- REM dreaming state. The easiest time to LD is actually Non-REM during early hours of the morning, however from experience the dreams are shorter so I prefer REM sleep.

HOW TO LD

I use the WILD method coupled with wake back to bed (WBTB)

1. Set alarm for 4 hours from when you sleep
2. sleep
3. alarm goes off, get up turn it off and don't go back to sleep. Remind yourself of why you woke up.
4. Lie down, any comfortable position and relax each muscle. The trick is to let the body fall asleep but keep the mind awake.
5. Ignore any urges to itch or move. This is the brain testing to see if body is asleep. Keep your focus on the blackness.
6. Breathing is important, count each breath in a controlled and unforced manner.
7. Eventually, you may feel numb or hear auditory noise or even feel tactile sensations. Ignore this as its the body falling asleep.
8. After this has finished, you will enter the hypnagogic state, when ended you will be in the dreamworld. This is hard to miss, you have transitioned straight from awake to asleep. So test reality to see if you are actually dreaming.

Hope this helps. Google anything here, these are well known techniques.
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H18.z
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Does it matter if I sleep under a duvet or without ? And I sleep on my side, will I need to sleep on my back?
Last edited by H18.z; 10 months ago
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MariaHamilton
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Report 10 months ago
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(Original post by username2692395)
I have one recently, and want to try it again, but I have no clue how. Also, I don't get much sleep at night, will this reduce my chances?
Hi there,
What is your ultimate goal? Why do you need a certain amount of sleep? Can you give more details?
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