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    hey guys, just started my first year of vet school and if you have any questions, just ask!
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    Hi, I could I ask how much free time you have and how stressful the course is, please? I really would like to be a vet, but am worried about not having time for anything else.

    Thanks very much.
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    Which vet school did you got to and how much/ how varied was your work experience when you applied? I'm worried I may not have enough variety at the moment.

    Also, if you applied to Bristol, do you know why they decided not to interview this year and whether they'll skip the interview next year?

    Thanks so much
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    Any other first years could you please answer? Think OP has forgotten the thread.
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    OP seems to have gone walkabouts so I'll jump in ...

    (Original post by Bethan1412)
    Hi, I could I ask how much free time you have and how stressful the course is, please? I really would like to be a vet, but am worried about not having time for anything else.

    Thanks very much.
    Honestly, there isn't a great deal of free time and the course is stressful to a point, there is a lot of content and it leads to a profession which ultimately leaves you with a lot of responsibility. That said, the vet schools are very hot on mental wellbeing at the moment and that includes having some work life balance. It may be reasonable to say join one sports club/society (Wed afternoons are free at uni to do just that) but most vet students would struggle to balance a ton of extracurriculars/ going out partying every night as well so you may find you don't have as much time on your hands as friends on other courses.

    (Original post by 6573282)
    Which vet school did you got to and how much/ how varied was your work experience when you applied? I'm worried I may not have enough variety at the moment.

    Also, if you applied to Bristol, do you know why they decided not to interview this year and whether they'll skip the interview next year?

    Thanks so much
    How much do you have currently? You may have noticed the trend at the moment is for the vet schools to drop their minimum requirements - for example Liverpool have dropped several weeks off theirs as it used to be 10wks, that said the more you do the more you will have to shape your opinions, reflect on and talk about at interview. As you mentioned variety is important, as well as the minimum amount of clinical vet work they want you to see you really want to be hitting the key husbandry areas - kennels/cattery, stables, lambing and dairy/beef if at all possible. If it was available to you pigs and poultry work is also good, anything on top of this like zoo/wildlife park, abattoir, lab work, exotics etc is great but make sure you get the basics down first!
    As for Bristol, I read somewhere that they found the interview process wasn't any more effective in assessing for good candidates than doing it all on paper but that may not be truth so take it as pure speculation. It will be interesting to see whether they stick with their new non-interview method going forwards once they meet their new batches of students in person!
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    Thank you for your help. It's not that I want to party all the time (or any of the time!), I'm just aware that I am susceptible to becoming stressed and it wouldn't be ideal to work ALL of the time, although I do a considerable amount for A Level, so I know that I am capable. It would be a case of whether I was able to go for my early morning run, and not work the entire weekend. Thanks again, I shall keep thinking!
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    (Original post by Bethan1412)
    Thank you for your help. It's not that I want to party all the time (or any of the time!), I'm just aware that I am susceptible to becoming stressed and it wouldn't be ideal to work ALL of the time, although I do a considerable amount for A Level, so I know that I am capable. It would be a case of whether I was able to go for my early morning run, and not work the entire weekend. Thanks again, I shall keep thinking!
    To perhaps add a different viewpoint to the table from another 1st year

    You absolutely can afford to take a day or so off a week, perhaps you won't wish to closer to the exam period but it is achievable. Working less but more efficiently is the key to success.

    One of our lecturers said in the majority of cases if you have more than one piece of A4 double sided with notes for a lecture then you have written too much and should simplify it down.

    I know people that work non-stop and others that don't work enough. For the massive difference in input their result differences are not that great. Not to mention the more relaxed members of the cohort tend to have a far more positive outlook and happy life whereas those working like mad always seem miserable and stressed. It all depends upon your outlook
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    What were your GCSE
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    (Original post by VMD100)
    To perhaps add a different viewpoint to the table from another 1st year

    You absolutely can afford to take a day or so off a week, perhaps you won't wish to closer to the exam period but it is achievable. Working less but more efficiently is the key to success.

    One of our lecturers said in the majority of cases if you have more than one piece of A4 double sided with notes for a lecture then you have written too much and should simplify it down.

    I know people that work non-stop and others that don't work enough. For the massive difference in input their result differences are not that great. Not to mention the more relaxed members of the cohort tend to have a far more positive outlook and happy life whereas those working like mad always seem miserable and stressed. It all depends upon your outlook
    Thank you so much. That has made me feel quite a lot better! I wasn't expecting a whole day off a week, actually, so it's made me think I might actually be ok Thank you again - I really appreciate you taking the time to share your opinion.
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    How much do you have currently? You may have noticed the trend at the moment is for the vet schools to drop their minimum requirements - for example Liverpool have dropped several weeks off theirs as it used to be 10wks, that said the more you do the more you will have to shape your opinions, reflect on and talk about at interview. As you mentioned variety is important, as well as the minimum amount of clinical vet work they want you to see you really want to be hitting the key husbandry areas - kennels/cattery, stables, lambing and dairy/beef if at all possible. If it was available to you pigs and poultry work is also good, anything on top of this like zoo/wildlife park, abattoir, lab work, exotics etc is great but make sure you get the basics down first!
    As for Bristol, I read somewhere that they found the interview process wasn't any more effective in assessing for good candidates than doing it all on paper but that may not be truth so take it as pure speculation. It will be interesting to see whether they stick with their new non-interview method going forwards once they meet their new batches of students in person![/QUOTE]

    Thanks for responding, I currently have 2 weeks at 2 small animal hospitals, 1 weeks at a riding school, 2 weeks at a rescue centre (kennels, catteries, and hutches), 1 week city petting farm, and 1 week at an exotic pet shop.

    I have also booked 1 week of lambing and 1 week at another small animal hospial. My concern is that I won't have enough experience on commercial farms and at large animal vets, since I live in London

    Another worry I have is how much I was learning during my placements. How much were you expected to have learned at each of your placements? I'm unsure how in-depth the notes I take have to be.

    Thanks again for responding, I really appreciate you answering my questions.
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    (Original post by 6573282)
    How much do you have currently? You may have noticed the trend at the moment is for the vet schools to drop their minimum requirements - for example Liverpool have dropped several weeks off theirs as it used to be 10wks, that said the more you do the more you will have to shape your opinions, reflect on and talk about at interview. As you mentioned variety is important, as well as the minimum amount of clinical vet work they want you to see you really want to be hitting the key husbandry areas - kennels/cattery, stables, lambing and dairy/beef if at all possible. If it was available to you pigs and poultry work is also good, anything on top of this like zoo/wildlife park, abattoir, lab work, exotics etc is great but make sure you get the basics down first!
    As for Bristol, I read somewhere that they found the interview process wasn't any more effective in assessing for good candidates than doing it all on paper but that may not be truth so take it as pure speculation. It will be interesting to see whether they stick with their new non-interview method going forwards once they meet their new batches of students in person!
    Thanks for responding, I currently have 2 weeks at 2 small animal hospitals, 1 weeks at a riding school, 2 weeks at a rescue centre (kennels, catteries, and hutches), 1 week city petting farm, and 1 week at an exotic pet shop.

    I have also booked 1 week of lambing and 1 week at another small animal hospial. My concern is that I won't have enough experience on commercial farms and at large animal vets, since I live in London

    Another worry I have is how much I was learning during my placements. How much were you expected to have learned at each of your placements? I'm unsure how in-depth the notes I take have to be.

    Thanks again for responding, I really appreciate you answering my questions.[/QUOTE]

    Bump! I really would also like to know how much we need to have learned from our placements.
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    That's a pretty good amount I would say, I agree some more time on commercial farm/ large animal vet experience would be ideal but I believe the vet schools are sympathetic to the fact that this is difficult if you are city based.

    In terms of what you should learn... In my opinion the point of all this work experience is to open your eyes to the different types of environments animals are kept in, to give you a sense of how they are looked after and the role that a vet plays in those (as well as getting you used to handling animals). There are of course important bits of info that you can pick up like what vaccinations you would give to a kitten vs a puppy etc but it is more about reflecting on what you saw - is it what you expected and if not why, have your opinions on the industry or controversial topics changed because of the experience, have you done any research based upon questions that came about from your experiences and so on... If you can think about each placement you do in these terms as well as taking away some more tangible knowledge then you are on the right track!
 
 
 
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