. How is the movement of Na+/K+ different from the movement of neurotransmitters acr

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Rafa4real
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hi guys, who knows the answer to the question below please. its has kept me awake all night.?






'How is the movement of Na+/K+ different from the movement of neuro transmitters across a plasma membrane'?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Hi, sorry about your sleepless night (!):-

Na+ and K+ move across the plasma membrane by active transport using a carrier molecule called Na+, K+ - ATPase, which needs energy in the form of ATP for this "pump" to act; for every three ions of sodium in one direction, two ions of potassium move in the opposite direction e.g. in the kidney, Na+ is normally conserved in exchange for K+, the latter being excreted (in the proximal convoluted tubule). This conservation of sodium is promoted by the renin-aldosterone-angiotension system; in Addison's disease, in which there is a deficiency of production of aldosterone by the adrenal cortex, there is loss of sodium leading to hypovolaemia ([GREEK: hypo = low] low fluid volume including blood volume) and a drop in blood pressure [which can be profound].

This Na+/K+ pump is also the basis for the development of a net negative charge within neurones (nerve cells).

IN CONTRAST, the movement of neurotransmitter across the plasma membrane involves the fusion of the vesicular membrane (vesicles are minute round [usually for excitatory neurotransmitters e.g. noradrenaline] or oval [for inhibitory ones e.g. GABA] globules that contain neurotransmitter) with the plasma membrane (the vesicle kind of pinches off the plasma membrane!) and extrusion of the contained neurotransmitter - this process is called exocytosis (GREEK: exo = outside; cyto = cell).

Hope this helps.
GOOD NIGHT!
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Rafa4real
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(Original post by macpatelgh)
Hi, sorry about your sleepless night (!):-

Na+ and K+ move across the plasma membrane by active transport using a carrier molecule called Na+, K+ - ATPase, which needs energy in the form of ATP for this "pump" to act; for every three ions of sodium in one direction, two ions of potassium move in the opposite direction e.g. in the kidney, Na+ is normally conserved in exchange for K+, the latter being excreted (in the proximal convoluted tubule). This conservation of sodium is promoted by the renin-aldosterone-angiotension system; in Addison's disease, in which there is a deficiency of production of aldosterone by the adrenal cortex, there is loss of sodium leading to hypovolaemia ([GREEK: hypo = low] low fluid volume including blood volume) and a drop in blood pressure [which can be profound].

This Na+/K+ pump is also the basis for the development of a net negative charge within neurones (nerve cells).

IN CONTRAST, the movement of neurotransmitter across the plasma membrane involves the fusion of the vesicular membrane (vesicles are minute round [usually for excitatory neurotransmitters e.g. noradrenaline] or oval [for inhibitory ones e.g. GABA] globules that contain neurotransmitter) with the plasma membrane (the vesicle kind of pinches off the plasma membrane!) and extrusion of the contained neurotransmitter - this process is called exocytosis (GREEK: exo = outside; cyto = cell).

Hope this helps.
GOOD NIGHT!
thanks macpatelgh. really helpful
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