Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    How do you know what type of structure and bonding an element has?

    E.g give the structure and bonding of Na
    Thank you!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Look at Na in the periodic table. Where is it? What part is it in? What type of element is it? Is it non metal or metal? How does that dictate its bonding?
    Once you identify the obvious from that, then you can talk about why it is that particular structure and what it is composed off.
    Good luck, please ask more if you are not sure
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    it's a group 1 metal so it can form ionic bonds? How can I tell it's structure? Thank you for you help so far so is it a giant ionic or simple ionic?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Middlechild123)
    it's a group 1 metal so it can form ionic bonds? How can I tell it's structure? Thank you for you help so far so is it a giant ionic or simple ionic?
    An ionic bond can forms positive and negative ion as one loses an electron and the other gains electrons. This is between metals and non metals.
    They key word for bonding in Na is "metal"
    So how could this relate to the bonding?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    So it's metallic? How can I actually tell for other elements?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Sodium has an atomic no of 11 and a mass no of 23. This tells you that a SODIUM ATOM has 11 protons, 12 neutrons and 11 electrons. (same no of protons (+ve) and electrons (-ve) so no charge - remember this way: any element that is in ATOMIC state and NOT in IONIC state should have no net charge (keeping it simple) (imagine ]v simply] that if you touch an iron key, you do not get an electric shock because the iron is made of atoms here NOT charged IONS). It is useful to remember that the innermost shell in an atom has two electrons, the next one out has 8, etc.

    So innermost shell of Na atom has 2, next shell 8 (with 11 electrons total; that leaves 1 in outermost shell (hence Group 1 metal).

    Metals (except transition metals) will have up to three electrons in outer shell - they will lose 1-3 from the outer shell e.g. Ca [calcium ATOM] will lose 2 electrons to give Ca++ [calcium ION]; Al [aluminium ATOM] will lose 3 electrons to give Al+++ [aluminium ION]) - a complete 8 in outer shell gives stability.

    When sodium atom becomes an ion, it is easier for it to lose one electron than to gain 7 electrons (obviously) to achieve stable 8.

    Also sodium is the 2nd smallest metal in Group 1 (after Lithium: atomic no 3) so the electrons are closer to +ve protons in the nucleus, so [unlikes attract - think of girl and boy) so Na is less reactive than e.g. Caesium (also Group 1 metal - much larger) i.e. it is more difficult for electron to "break away" from positive nucleus attraction [protons].

    WHEN Na+ ION forms by loss of an electron, there is a net excess of one +ve charge left (one more proton = 11 than electrons = 10 now) so Na+ AND NOT Na- [sounds stupid, but trying to make it simple for you!] - opposite for -ve ions = anions e.g. chlorine atom gains an electron to make Cl- [non-metal])..

    Hope this makes it "easy peasy lemon squeezy)

    M (private tutor [science])
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    so sodium is metallic with metallic bonding?
    Thanks for all the help so far
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Groups 1,2 and 3: Metallic
    Group 4: Covalent/macromolecular
    Groups 5,6 and 7: Simple molecular
    Group 0: Exist as free atoms that don't form compounds
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    thank you
 
 
 

University open days

  1. University of Edinburgh
    All Departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  2. University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
  3. Loughborough University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.