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Accreditation- for medical degrees and similar health degrees Watch

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    Hi guys question is about what the accreditation is for the medical degrees who its done by, what is needed etc. For other industries its seems much easier to find this information. E.g Engineering - you can just go on the engineering council website and find all the accredited bodies e.g. ICE IMECHE etc and check what degree is accredited by who etc and what the pathways are to chartership.

    Also about advanced entry e.g. if you have done a physiotherapy degree etc how many years of the course could you skip? or what programmes are there accelerated etc. With the old UCAS search tool it was much easier to get the full list on screen of who offers what degree the new one is messier IMO. Or what about like ChemEng?

    Also for medicine degrees, Upon successful completion are you near enough guaranteed an interview with the NHS, like do they surpervise regulate the degrees, and recruit all the graduates etc. Like is that why lots of people want to do medicine so that as soon as they graduate they are pretty much guaranteed to get took on?
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    Look up the GMC.
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Also for medicine degrees, Upon successful completion are you near enough guaranteed an interview with the NHS, like do they surpervise regulate the degrees, and recruit all the graduates etc. Like is that why lots of people want to do medicine so that as soon as they graduate they are pretty much guaranteed to get took on?
    The GMC licenses and regulates doctors in the UK.

    Other health professionals will have their own regulatory bodies e.g. the GDC, NMC, GPC, HCPC etc.

    As a UK graduate you do not ordinarily need to interview in order to secure a FY1 doctor post (the only job which you will be licensed to do as a first year graduate). You do however need to jump through a lot of hoops and go through a six month job application process though, so it's not as simple as graduating and just walking into any job you like wherever you like. This process is run by the Department of Health on behalf of the NHS.
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Hi guys question is about what the accreditation is for the medical degrees who its done by, what is needed etc. For other industries its seems much easier to find this information. E.g Engineering - you can just go on the engineering council website and find all the accredited bodies e.g. ICE IMECHE etc and check what degree is accredited by who etc and what the pathways are to chartership.
    As said, GMC.

    Also about advanced entry e.g. if you have done a physiotherapy degree etc how many years of the course could you skip?
    Erm, none?! You can't just skip years of your degree lol. Pretty sure that's the case for engineering too.

    Also for medicine degrees, Upon successful completion are you near enough guaranteed an interview with the NHS, like do they surpervise regulate the degrees, and recruit all the graduates etc. Like is that why lots of people want to do medicine so that as soon as they graduate they are pretty much guaranteed to get took on?
    As long as you pass the course you are guaranteed employment yes.

    The flip side is that said employment could be anywhere in the country, and that because the NHS is a monopoly employer so has no incentive to make the job attractive and they do things like rotate your job to a different city every year (or more frequently), poor shift patterns, force you to do things that have no relevance to your career, etc. The arrangement also significantly suppresses wages - when the NHS turns to the private sector for staff (i.e. locums) the pay rate is usually 2-4x higher - and it dumps a whole bunch of compulsory fees on you just because they can.
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    [QUOTE=bigstu99;74939640]

    Also about advanced entry e.g. if you have done a physiotherapy degree etc how many years of the course could you skip? or what programmes are there accelerated etc. With the old UCAS search tool it was much easier to get the full list on screen of who offers what degree the new one is messier IMO. Or what about like ChemEng?

    QUOTE]

    [QUOTE=nexttime;74940106]As said, GMC.



    Erm, none?! You can't just skip years of your degree lol. Pretty sure that's the case for engineering too.


    QUOTE]

    I meant like if u had done a related degree like physiotherapy could u skip year 1 or 2. I know that for engineering, if u had completed say a Physics degree or maybe just year 1 and 2 or even just year 1 then as long as the modules included the relevant calculus ones, and mechanics(statics and dynamics) then u can very easily transfer into 2nd year Eng and skip 1st year so I was wondering if similar things happen for medicine grads
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    (Original post by bigstu99)

    I meant like if u had done a related degree like physiotherapy could u skip year 1 or 2. I know that for engineering, if u had completed say a Physics degree or maybe just year 1 and 2 or even just year 1 then as long as the modules included the relevant calculus ones, and mechanics(statics and dynamics) then u can very easily transfer into 2nd year Eng and skip 1st year so I was wondering if similar things happen for medicine grads
    Again, no, you can't skip any years, no matter what sort of 'related' degree you might have done.

    However something that IS possible, is to apply to a graduate entry medicine degree. These programmes are usually 4 years long rather than 5, and are for people who already have an undergraduate degree - usually in something related to medical science, but there are some programmes for students who have graduated in an Arts discipline. These 4 year programmes are very intense, and are much more competitive than the 5 year programme. If you apply to a standard 5-year programme as a graduate, you will be required to complete all 5 years of the programme.
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    (Original post by junior.doctor)
    Again, no, you can't skip any years, no matter what sort of 'related' degree you might have done.

    However something that IS possible, is to apply to a graduate entry medicine degree. These programmes are usually 4 years long rather than 5, and are for people who already have an undergraduate degree - usually in something related to medical science, but there are some programmes for students who have graduated in an Arts discipline. These 4 year programmes are very intense, and are much more competitive than the 5 year programme. If you apply to a standard 5-year programme as a graduate, you will be required to complete all 5 years of the programme.
    Thank you, were u a 5 year undergrad medicine then or went later on the 4 year thing? How much u earning now anything basic that I should know from an insiders perspective?
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Thank you, were u a 5 year undergrad medicine then or went later on the 4 year thing? How much u earning now anything basic that I should know from an insiders perspective?
    I was under the impression that it was rude to ask somebody what their salary is.

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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Thank you, were u a 5 year undergrad medicine then or went later on the 4 year thing? How much u earning now anything basic that I should know from an insiders perspective?
    I did a standard undergraduate medical degree, as it was my first degree. I did six years, the 5-year MbChB and then an extra intercalated BSc year.

    Doctors’ salary scales are readily available online, you can google them and there certainly used to be a page on the BMA website that listed salary for different training years. There used to be only a small amount of variation between different doctors, due to the ‘banding’ that was applied to the base salary, reflecting the degree of antisocial hours different posts had. However with the new junior doctor contract, there is a bit more variation now depending on the specifics of the out of hours work and the number of weekends worked.

    Personally, I feel it is a decent salary. I can live comfortably and buy luxuries and not have to count the pennies. But more importantly, I enjoy my job.
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    (Original post by Volibear)
    I was under the impression that it was rude to ask somebody what their salary is.

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    Oh, you were, that's great to know. If you are looking in to a career it makes sense to ask people in it about it. How much you are paid IMO is one of the most important aspects of the job. So asking about working hours, pay satisfaction they are all sensible questions, some people may not appreciate being asked and may not answer, but its good to ask as many people as possible as much as you can.

    If your target is to follow a certain career path you want to know what is in store, lots of people in the career don't mind telling especially to prospective workers who the information may be of use to
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Oh, you were, that's great to know. If you are looking in to a career it makes sense to ask people in it about it. How much you are paid IMO is one of the most important aspects of the job. So asking about working hours, pay satisfaction they are all sensible questions, some people may not appreciate being asked and may not answer, but its good to ask as many people as possible as much as you can.

    If your target is to follow a certain career path you want to know what is in store, lots of people in the career don't mind telling especially to prospective workers who the information may be of use to
    Right. I still would rather do my own research because it is impolite to go up to randomers and ask them for their salary. Especially with doctor salaries where it's pretty easy to find out how much you'll be paid at different stages.
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    (Original post by Volibear)
    Right. I still would rather do my own research because it is impolite to go up to randomers and ask them for their salary. Especially with doctor salaries where it's pretty easy to find out how much you'll be paid at different stages.
    Not going to be less informed and make less informed decisions on possibly my most important decision just because it's "impolite to ask"

    Fair enough for certain things where the pay is set by government but there are situations where asking helps. statistics and whatnot can be misleading because of the different metrics and things which are factored in/ not included or stated when they should/ shouldn't be. (using wrong vocab here but u get the idea)
    E.g if u wanna know what u will get as a civ eng grad looking on payscale .com may be innacurate. ur better of asking the grads at standard companies e.g. balfour, laing, morgan sindall etc what they got when they grad. then those 3 years down the line. And then section engineers and project engineers/managers. draw it into your own tables, and progression graphs curves and thatll give u a better idea (it wont be 100% accurate but it will be more contextual, and they will tell u things like o I only earn this much cos I had to do lots of overtime etc and other details which ud never otherwise have known)
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Not going to be less informed and make less informed decisions on possibly my most important decision just because it's "impolite to ask"

    Fair enough for certain things where the pay is set by government but there are situations where asking helps. statistics and whatnot can be misleading because of the different metrics and things which are factored in/ not included or stated when they should/ shouldn't be. (using wrong vocab here but u get the idea)
    E.g if u wanna know what u will get as a civ eng grad looking on payscale .com may be innacurate. ur better of asking the grads at standard companies e.g. balfour, laing, morgan sindall etc what they got when they grad. then those 3 years down the line. And then section engineers and project engineers/managers. draw it into your own tables, and progression graphs curves and thatll give u a better idea (it wont be 100% accurate but it will be more contextual, and they will tell u things like o I only earn this much cos I had to do lots of overtime etc and other details which ud never otherwise have known)

    Right whatever. Also, it only takes two extra letters to write 'your', 'you' and 'you'd' correctly.
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    Here's a link to how much doctors earn in the UK.
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    it doesn't really matter though does it? In the flow of typing I miss them out (not thinking about using full spelling for words like "you" when you can read u just fine.

    You typed "Right, whatever."

    (Original post by Volibear)
    Right whatever.
    should I start going "oh look at me mr nestle smartie pants you didn't use a full sentence". No there's no point doing that, you know its not a full sentence. Obviously I can spell the word "you". If "u" think writing "you" makes you smarter than if "you" wrote "u" instead then good for "u".
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    it doesn't really matter though does it? In the flow of typing I miss them out (not thinking about using full spelling for words like "you" when you can read u just fine.

    You typed "Right, whatever."



    should I start going "oh look at me mr nestle smartie pants you didn't use a full sentence". No there's no point doing that, you know its not a full sentence. Obviously I can spell the word "you". If "u" think writing "you" makes you smarter than if "you" wrote "u" instead then good for "u".
    Cool story. Did you check out the other poster's link?

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    Was hoping someone could find some more narrowed down figures than what I found online as the brackets are pretty generic like £55k to £85k for a gp is a big variance so woulkd be helpful if a few could tell me specifically but if all u can do is say haha uuurrr go on google immm really clever man.its not really trhat helpful but thanks to everyone who has responded anyway.
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Was hoping someone could find some more narrowed down figures than what I found online as the brackets are pretty generic like £55k to £85k for a gp is a big variance so woulkd be helpful if a few could tell me specifically but if all u can do is say haha uuurrr go on google immm really clever man.its not really trhat helpful but thanks to everyone who has responded anyway.
    Why don't you go into your local GP practice, book an appointment (or several) and ask them directly?

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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Not going to be less informed and make less informed decisions on possibly my most important decision just because it's "impolite to ask"

    Fair enough for certain things where the pay is set by government but there are situations where asking helps. statistics and whatnot can be misleading because of the different metrics and things which are factored in/ not included or stated when they should/ shouldn't be. (using wrong vocab here but u get the idea)
    E.g if u wanna know what u will get as a civ eng grad looking on payscale .com may be innacurate. ur better of asking the grads at standard companies e.g. balfour, laing, morgan sindall etc what they got when they grad. then those 3 years down the line. And then section engineers and project engineers/managers. draw it into your own tables, and progression graphs curves and thatll give u a better idea (it wont be 100% accurate but it will be more contextual, and they will tell u things like o I only earn this much cos I had to do lots of overtime etc and other details which ud never otherwise have known)
    You managed to write so much and say so so little here it's actually funny.
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    (Original post by bigstu99)
    Was hoping someone could find some more narrowed down figures than what I found online as the brackets are pretty generic like £55k to £85k for a gp is a big variance so woulkd be helpful if a few could tell me specifically but if all u can do is say haha uuurrr go on google immm really clever man.its not really trhat helpful but thanks to everyone who has responded anyway.
    That's because most GPs are like to work in that role for some 20 odd years after qualifying. They will typically start off at the 55k end and then have year on year salary increases moving towards the end. I don't know the specific format of the progression, however as indicated previously by another poster all of this information is easily available on the web and published for the public to view at will.

    A GP may also do locum work in addition to or in place of a permanent position, which depending on the hours worked may equate to higher pay values. There is also an extra allowance for those working in London, and for hospital based specialties there may be call or shift allowances depending on the relevant aspects of the job.

    It's irrelevant anyway, because while it's a large difference between the two numbers, you will be earning more than enough to make ends meet at the lower end of the spectrum, so anything more is just "gravy".
 
 
 
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