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    What are the pros and cons of consideration in contract law? And what is possible alternative ?
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    (Original post by Tasnim S)
    What are the pros and cons of consideration in contract law? And what is possible alternative ?
    Go do some research. There's no such thing as a 'pro' and 'con' of consideration. Consideration serves certain functions, some of which may be rendered redundant by other elements of agreement in the formation of a contract. What these functions are, and to what extent they can be fulfilled by, let's say, the criterion of an intent to create legal relations, are up for discussion.
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    (Original post by Tasnim S)
    What are the pros and cons of consideration in contract law? And what is possible alternative ?
    If I promise you I'll help you answer your obligations homework - and then I don't because you haven't offered me anything in return - I'm just being held to a unilateral promise (setting aside ICLR).

    Do you think this is a fair situation? Contract is part of law of obligations. If one party has no obligations, is it really a contract?

    As for an alternative - think about Wills and Trusts. These are gifting obligations that are unilateral - but they have a particular legal form whereas most contracts don't.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Ah, this really should be the TSR motto.



    Arguable. There are pros and cons to consideration. I just don't want to answer the OPs question for him/her.
    If someone is lost, often all they need is to just be nudged in the right direction.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Ah, this really should be the TSR motto.



    Arguable. There are pros and cons to consideration. I just don't want to answer the OPs question for him/her.
    My point is only that a 'pro' and a 'con' of anything can only be defined once you've established what end that function is serving. In contract law, there may be more than one end, and that end can be more or less anything. However, consideration may not be the best way of fulfilling that end (which is presumably why the OP is asking for alternatives).

    My issue is that the OP framed the matter in an extremely simple way, which leads me to fear that they will produce an essay where they're gonna list the 'good' and 'bad' bits of consideration, but with very little clash or framing.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    If someone is lost, often all they need is to just be nudged in the right direction.
    That sounds like the text of a motivational poster.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    That sounds like the text of a motivational poster.
    No. I am not really known for my patience.

    But some time ago a maths PhD was on here asking for advice on estoppel. She made the point that if someone posted their question in a maths forum 20 people would be posting advice, but in law we don't bother. It's not really a fair comparison as in maths they'd give their working, though most on here wouldn't bother to help people even if they did give an outline of their ideas.
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    (Original post by Tasnim S)
    If this were real life i'd be sure to batter you in the face. Silly *******.
    You probably wouldn't be able to.

    Notorious B.I.G Trinculo You guys are witnesses. I tried to help and this is what I'm getting in response. Some lazy angry person reading through my posts before reading Fuller's 1973 article on consideration*.


    Spoiler:
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    *That's the second or third helpful nudge I've given on this thread. I am a generous human.





    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    No. I am not really known for my patience.

    But some time ago a maths PhD was on here asking for advice on estoppel. She made the point that if someone posted their question in a maths forum 20 people would be posting advice, but in law we don't bother. It's not really a fair comparison as in maths they'd give their working, though most on here wouldn't bother to help people even if they did give an outline of their ideas.
    I fully agree that that's a fair comparison for her to make. It's very easy to forget a lot of the detail in law if you haven't read up on something recently. More importantly, solving other people's problems doesn't always make us better students of our discipline. It just involves us summarising something we've already read/argued in our own work, which is tedious and uninspiring in most cases. I hope that you told her that her PhD requires some independent research and left her at that.
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    (Original post by Tasnim S)
    If this were real life i'd be sure to batter you in the face. Silly *******.
    Is that a way to speak to your betters? Do they not teach you manners at Brunel or whatever ****-heap you study at?

    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    You probably wouldn't be able to.

    Notorious B.I.G Trinculo You guys are witnesses. I tried to help and this is what I'm getting in response. Some lazy angry person reading through my posts before reading Fuller's 1973 article on consideration*.


    Spoiler:
    Show






    *That's the second or third helpful nudge I've given on this thread. I am a generous human.








    I fully agree that that's a fair comparison for her to make. It's very easy to forget a lot of the detail in law if you haven't read up on something recently. More importantly, solving other people's problems doesn't always make us better students of our discipline. It just involves us summarising something we've already read/argued in our own work, which is tedious and uninspiring in most cases. I hope that you told her that her PhD requires some independent research and left her at that.
    And to be honest, a lot of the fundamental stuff we do as law students is not obvious. It takes some getting used to. Having someone quickly explain the answer can give people the confidence to tackle it for themselves next time. However, there are people who do take the piss. I still help them as it means I can procrastinate reading a 100-page Appellate Body judgment, but on principle I shouldn't.
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Is that a way to speak to your betters? Do they not teach you manners at Brunel or whatever ****-heap you study at?
    LMAO :laugh:
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    No. I am not really known for my patience.

    But some time ago a maths PhD was on here asking for advice on estoppel. She made the point that if someone posted their question in a maths forum 20 people would be posting advice, but in law we don't bother. It's not really a fair comparison as in maths they'd give their working, though most on here wouldn't bother to help people even if they did give an outline of their ideas.
    Not just law, but in the politics section too
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    I think we've had enough flaming for one day.

    Closed.
 
 
 
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