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What's the difference between Game design and Game development? Watch

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    I really want to be a video Game developer and learn to use programming languages and OOP and over various paths to becoming a game developer. But is Game Design more art based? Or is is both areas combined. I'm highly confused and need some advice :/
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    Design: How do we make it profitable?

    Development: How do we manage our resources?
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    But which one is the one where I actullay learn to make games and use programs like Unity and Unreal
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    (Original post by Jaktwy)
    But which one is the one where I actually learn to make games and use programs like Unity and Unreal
    developer
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    So on my UCAS should I chose Game programming or Game designer to be a developer?
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    (Original post by Jaktwy)
    So on my UCAS should I chose Game programming or Game designer to be a developer?
    Programming I imagine. But I don't know the modules offered, so can't be certain.
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    This is more of a philosophical question than practical. In fact even in industry, the difference between roles with such titles tends to vary between companies, with what would be a "game designer" at one company acting as a "game developer" at another, and some where the two are essentially the same role anyway. More and more, you see things being advertised with more specificity - game engine programmer, environment artist, character designer, 3D modelling artist, etc, etc. As such, designers and developers end up being essentially the same thing regardless of your views on this.

    Theoretically, game development deals with the overall picture - you're planning out how to deliver the end result, a game. You'll be involved to some degree with all elements of the game, from start to finish, although you may not do much direct work in various areas - for example you may only be managing the programming, rather than actually doing any. Thus, development is essentially implementing the people and tools to create the game.

    Design is, ostensibly, creating aspects of the game directly - however this can vary considerably depending on exactly what the role is. There's the art (conceptual and in game), models and graphics, environment, writing and story, mechanics and game engine...all parts of the game have to be "designed" in some sense, unless you work for EA in which case you'll just recycle garbage from the previous incarnation. However clearly all of these different areas are approached using different tools and methods, and so the concept of an overall "designer" seems less applicable for a large scale project...hence the overlap with the idea of a developer.

    In terms of degree name, "games design" courses tend to be more focused on the art side of things, whereas games development/programming tend to focus more on the actual implementation of this in code. Of course, elements of both crop up in either - a game art/design course will probably include aspects of computer graphics, and it's likely some basic elements of computing will be taught to support this. Similarly, being able to code a bunch of spheres to move around isn't really relevant to industry (unless you're making a new super monkey ball) and is a bit trivial in this sense, so you'll probably be expected to make some effort to create more complex concepts to realise. They'll just focus more on one side or the other, usually.

    A friend of mine did games development as a degree, and it was more on the computing side - however it also included aspects of business, as well as psychology (in particularly the psychology underpinning decision making by players and regarding interface design/ergonomics). He did have some computer graphics type modules, but I mean, I saw his final project - it was ugly, but that wasn't what he was being marked on. The actual code/mechanics was the important thing, and that was what he developed in a novel way (or what he was meant to do - I don't actually know what he got on his dissertation module).

    I would realistically suggest doing Computer Science and getting a more general degree, which will allow you to develop your own engines from scratch, and do gaming specific projects yourself on the side, or through optional/project modules. "Games Development" degrees are a fairly new thing (like, in the last 5-7 years) however large scale game publishers have been recruiting developers (and/or designers) for a long time before that - obviously you can get the necessary background to pursue the area from a non-specialist degree, and arguably you're better positioned if you do. As above, a more general CS course will give you a broader background and bigger "toolbox" to draw on, which has been taught without loss of generality - so you can apply these techniques and tools to gaming related things, but you also can see the bigger picture, and innovate new tools as you need to. Whereas if you've only learned to do things in a certain way using certain tools, if a company uses different development tools than what you've learned, and you can't demonstrate you are able to adapt to these ones, you've just run yourself out of a job opportunity.
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    Look at each of the courses on the universities website, I'm sure they will tell you exactly what is involved
 
 
 
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