Thefeynman
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Which one is harder at undergrad level, maths or physics?
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HertsExRep
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(Original post by Thefeynman)
Which one is harder at undergrad level, maths or physics?
The answer to this depends entirely on where your strengths lie!
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moonswooning
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I personally find physics is easier because it has context but when maths is taught it's generally out of context which makes it more confusing but i mean both are hard subjects
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Thefeynman
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(Original post by Michelle Bieger)
The answer to this depends entirely on where your strengths lie!
I personally find maths easier but physics is more enjoyable since it's more applied
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Thefeynman
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(Original post by moonswooning)
I personally find physics is easier because it has context but when maths is taught it's generally out of context which makes it more confusing but i mean both are hard subjects
Are you doing a degree in physics?
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HertsExRep
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(Original post by Thefeynman)
I personally find maths easier but physics is more enjoyable since it's more applied
A degree requires dedication, commitment, and passion to accomplish. A good degree requires all that, plus the motivation to go above and beyond and complete things like work placements.

For me personally, when I found things less enjoyable, I found myself unable to muster up any of the above and therefore would less well academically in those subject areas. I do a degree in physics, but for the life of me I cannot find optics interesting and therefore found that my grade for that module was not up to my standards. Purely anecdotally, I found this to be the case amongst my friends as well, and the people that were the first drop out of the course were the ones who did not enjoy their topics.

Are you asking because you're trying to choose a path in uni? If so, know you'll get plenty of areas to flex your math prowess in physics (the first two years you'll share maths classes with maths students oftentimes--at least at UHerts) and your ease in maths will pay off in physics, for sure.

Check out the modules in the second, third years of degrees in order to get a better idea of what the difference between two are. Eg. maths and physics at University of Hertfordshire.
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Thefeynman
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(Original post by Michelle Bieger)
A degree requires dedication, commitment, and passion to accomplish. A good degree requires all that, plus the motivation to go above and beyond and complete things like work placements.

For me personally, when I found things less enjoyable, I found myself unable to muster up any of the above and therefore would less well academically in those subject areas. I do a degree in physics, but for the life of me I cannot find optics interesting and therefore found that my grade for that module was not up to my standards. Purely anecdotally, I found this to be the case amongst my friends as well, and the people that were the first drop out of the course were the ones who did not enjoy their topics.

Are you asking because you're trying to choose a path in uni? If so, know you'll get plenty of areas to flex your math prowess in physics (the first two years you'll share maths classes with maths students oftentimes--at least at UHerts) and your ease in maths will pay off in physics, for sure.

Check out the modules in the second, third years of degrees in order to get a better idea of what the difference between two are. Eg. maths and physics at University of Hertfordshire.
Thank you for your detailed respond. I agree with you .
Atm I'm in my second year studying mech eng. But I don't find it as interesting because it's mostly design projects. I was thinking of switching to something a more theoretical like physics. Actually this morning I went to one of my friends optic lectures which was about Mach-Zehnder interferometer. I have also been going to some fields and quantum lectures. I find physics very interesting.
Do you study pure physics or physics with something? And how's your experience with the subject?
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HertsExRep
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(Original post by Thefeynman)
Thank you for your detailed respond. I agree with you .
Atm I'm in my second year studying mech eng. But I don't find it as interesting because it's mostly design projects. I was thinking of switching to something a more theoretical like physics. Actually this morning I went to one of my friends optic lectures which was about Mach-Zehnder interferometer. I have also been going to some fields and quantum lectures. I find physics very interesting.
Do you study pure physics or physics with something? And how's your experience with the subject?
I myself study physics, yes--I'm currently in my fourth year of the MPhys! I really enjoy the subject, and am probably looking at doing some astrophysics research. If you have any further questions please let me know!

You mention quantum field lectures specifically...let me just say that most physics graduates, don't end up going into research. That goes equally so for theoretical physics, which as a research field is highly, highly competitive. If you enjoy the quantum field theory, know that the research life is much different from the lectures; much more gruelling and much more teaching life than you may imagine. I don't say that to put you off! I just want to ensure you have a realistic idea of what quantum research life is like--it's not just swishing about in a uni office, teaching occasionally on blackboards, and in the meantime getting to talk about black holes and CERN.

That being said, there are so many career areas you can go into with physics! Take a look and see if any of these appeal that you could not go into with your Mech Eng degree.

Finally, what is it about the design projects that you dislike so much? Perhaps you're just experiencing the very common two year slump in your degree--the second year of every degree can get very humdrum, and in my experience this is the part where everyone thinks, maybe I should have done something else? Remember you can always keep physics as a hobby...but you can't get back the time you spent studying the first two years of the Mech Eng degree.
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