Do I count as "British"? Watch

Emms98
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Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport. I'd say I identify with British culture and especially since my parents are from commonwealth countries and I basically only really remember living in the UK I feel like I have far more of a connection to the UK than anywhere else

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
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username2569523
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Well yes. You are a British citizen with a British passport.
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Yaboi
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No.
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MartinF98
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I guess you could say you're 'British' since you are a British citizen but you're not 'from' Britain, you're from Germany and of Indian-Sri Lankan descent. The appropriate answer to "where are you from?" would be "I'm from Germany but my parents are from India and Sri Lanka, and I have been living in the UK for eleven years."
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999tigger
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(Original post by Emms98)
Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport.

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
British passport defines your nationality.
You may decide that differs from your ethnicity.
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NickAlex12
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No you're German, but of Indian and Sri Lankan ethnic background.
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icequeenTM
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Yes because you have a British passport which immediately classes you as a British citizen.

...You were just not born in Britain
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Abiabiabiabi
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(Original post by Emms98)
Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport. I'd say I identify with British culture and especially since my parents are from commonwealth countries and I basically only really remember living in the UK I feel like I have far more of a connection to the UK than anywhere else

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
I'm in a similar situation as you. My parents re from Sri-lanka (grandparents now living in India) I was born and raised in Norway till i was 6. I now live in London (for like 10 years) but i have a Norwegian Passport but are whole family have a British Visa for permanent residence. I don't even know what i am tbh.
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desaf1
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Not really. I was actually born in Britain and lived here my entire life but even I don't think I can genuinely call myself British when I'm in reality from Pakistan, where my grandparents are from. We might be British on paper but that doesn't mean that we are actually British.
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JVoorhees
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Unlike other countries such as India or Sri Lanka for example, they do throw open citizenship to everyone so yes you are British. This could change in the future though.
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DetectivePeralta
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(Original post by Abiabiabiabi)
I'm in a similar situation as you. My parents re from Sri-lanka (grandparents now living in India) I was born and raised in Norway till i was 6. I now live in London (for like 10 years) but i have a Norwegian Passport but are whole family have a British Visa for permanent residence. I don't even know what i am tbh.
Well when you're 18 you can apply for British citizenship and then you'll officially be British of Sri Lankan origin.
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FarhanHalim
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You're more of a global citizen but also British
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deltagolf
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(Original post by Emms98)
Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport. I'd say I identify with British culture and especially since my parents are from commonwealth countries and I basically only really remember living in the UK I feel like I have far more of a connection to the UK than anywhere else

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
Hello there I am kind of in a similar situation to you, not entirely but kind of.

This is my story: I am of Indian descent as both my parents are Indian, I was born in Bermuda but I only stayed there for three months, then we moved to India for a duration of three years where I was in the KG class, then we moved to England because my father was given a job offer here I was three then. We lived in two previous cities before moving to the city I live in now but they were both for a duration of three months, I have been in my current city since 2006 basically. In my younger days if I was asked where I was from my reply would always be Indian, my parents never put too much stress on cultural activities and self-identification upon me. I would at that age like to research things about India and stuff. I had been an Indian citizen and passport holder since birth, it was in Year 8 or 7 when we became naturalised citizens of the UK and got UK passports. Around that time as well I did not feel so enthusiastic about learning about India as I have been, I taught myself how to read and write in Hindi. Hindi is my first language but to be honest I just speak English at home and my standard of Hindi is quite bad. I think it was around the end of Year 8 when I started to feel more disconnected to my 'Indianness' I one day had a thought to myself and said I'm not really Indian am I. Since moving to the UK I had only been to India twice, in Year 1 and 2. I then thought that if I go to India I would not be able to relate with the culture and everything for I am assimilated into the UK and England. I realised I can't really associate with Indians and I am more British and English than I am Indian.
Then on I'd start considering myself British and English and from the city where I currently reside. Nobody ever challenged my decision due to how open-minded British society is on such matters.

Also as others said that 'you should consider yourself from Germany' I would totally disagree. Like you and I have said we feel more of a connection to the UK than any other country in this world, we are British. It cannot be denied. I cannot in any way whatsoever consider myself from Bermuda, I can only class it as my place of birth. So I personally do think you are British and and you should class yourself as British.
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LRxS
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You’re a legal British citizen & you identify with British culture. There is literally no way saying you’re British would be incorrect.
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almighty_crj
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(Original post by 999tigger)
British passport defines your nationality.
A passport doesn't exempt you from immigration controls or grant you recognition as a UK national with the rights that accompany it.

I'm still trying to figure out how OP would be UK national if the parents were just from the Indian sub continent.
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DetectivePeralta
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(Original post by almighty_crj)
A passport doesn't exempt you from immigration controls or grant you recognition as a UK national with the rights that accompany it.

I'm still trying to figure out how OP would be UK national if the parents were just from the Indian sub continent.
Actually, yes it does. UK citizenship makes one a UK national and gives one all the rights a UK national has:
https://www.gov.uk/types-of-british-nationality
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999tigger
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(Original post by almighty_crj)
A passport doesn't exempt you from immigration controls or grant you recognition as a UK national with the rights that accompany it.

I'm still trying to figure out how OP would be UK national if the parents were just from the Indian sub continent.
Do you know a lot about immigration law?
The passport is recognition of their British nationality. A full UK passport is evidence of their entitlement to all the rights that go with citizenship.

Who suggested it exempted you from immigration control? That would be your imagination.

Being born here is just one of the ways of getting citizenship. You do realise there are different ways?
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thotproduct
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There is a difference between nationality, national identity and ethnicity.

Nationality
i.e the passports you own, I have more than one, meaning I am a citizen of more than one country. You, have passports for instance, if you have both a German and British passports, you have both a German and British citizenship, meaning you are citizens of both. If you have British passport, you are legally a British citizen, and have the same rights and privileges of anyone else in this country, and no one can deny that from you.

National Identity
i.e based on your citizenships/ethnicity too (if you do not occupy citizenship of your origin nation), which one do you identify most with, do you identify as a British citizen, cool, that makes you British, do you adhere to the standards or maybe some of the cultural beliefs and activities here that you identify with? Cool, if you have the citizenship, you are British.

Ethnically?
No, but no one can change their ethnicity, it's something that lasts with you. You are a British national with ethnic origins to India/Sri Lanka, getting nationality does not inherently make you 'ethnically British' or European or whatever, but you're still British by nationality, citizenship, and potentially national identity, depending on your views.

So in summary.
You are a British national, you have the right to call yourself British, you have a passport, are a citizen, live here, speak the language, are in the culture, abide by the rules and standards of this nation, and no one can take that away from you, however this does not change your ethnicity.
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stoyfan
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(Original post by Emms98)
Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport. I'd say I identify with British culture and especially since my parents are from commonwealth countries and I basically only really remember living in the UK I feel like I have far more of a connection to the UK than anywhere else

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
For someone to have a British passport, you would need to be a British national. Therefore you must be a British national, and as a result, you are British.

So you can say that you are 'British'.

It is pretty much as simple as that.
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eldorado888
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(Original post by Emms98)
Basically I have a very weird family history so I guess I'm sort a 'third culture kid'. My parents are from India and Sri Lanka but they lived in France for four years and in Germany for ten years. I was born in Germany and lived there for 7-8 years although I went to an international school (so can't speak German) and visited my relatives (most of whom live in the U.K.) almost every year during the holidays. I moved to the UK when I was 8 and have lived here now for 11 years and speak fluent English in a RP British accent. I have a British passport. I'd say I identify with British culture and especially since my parents are from commonwealth countries and I basically only really remember living in the UK I feel like I have far more of a connection to the UK than anywhere else

Legally I would be considered a British national but I'm just wondering, would it be okay for me to say that I'm British since I wasn't actually born here and my parents weren't born here?
Have a DNA test. That will determine whether you could possibly be British. If both your parents are Indian, I would assume that you would have Indian DNA, not Western European DNA. Britain is a blood state, just like India.
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