Asterope Celaeno
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how do I revise
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Asterope Celaeno
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(Original post by Chaz254)
Not on TSR, for a start.
okay then tell me
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Asterope Celaeno
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okay, so tell me how then
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Purdy7
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This is a really good question and it is a real shame it isn't taught more in schools. Here's a brief run down (if you want to know more then check out the book 'Introduction to Psychology' by Atkinson which had (in the edition I have) some great chapters on learning and the memory).

THE SCIENCE BIT
The brain has 2 types of memory - long term and short term. The later holds information for short while before it is either dumped into the forget pile or moved to the long term memory. Ideally when revising you need to move things from STM to the LTM.

The STM can only hold up to 9 items at a time before it gets chucked out, so study in chunks of 5-7 bits at a time. It makes better pathways with repeated use and association to thing you already know, also the senses also help.

THE PEOPLE BIT
Each person learns differently, but most fit into 3 categories- visual (learn better when they see it), audio (learn better when they hear it), and Kinesthetic (remember best when moving). However, there are other categories, so check out Howard Gardeners work on Multiple Intelligences. You will need to know which way you best learn and recall thus remember.

THE WAY TO STUDY
Study smarter not harder.
In class, take notes, then 5 minute after class go over what was learnt, then again in the evening. Go over it again every day for a week, then review after every week, 1 month and 6 months. Only after 6 months will it go into your long term memory. This is why most students start revision for exams in January for the June exams.

When studying/revising study for 20 minutes, then take 5 minutes break (do something physical like dancing or juggling it helps the synapses in the brain to build memory pathways. Go back for another 20 minutes and review the last session before going onto the next piece to do,then another 5 minute break etc.

GET ORGANISED
Set up a study area (ideally as close to the exam set up as possible), so a desk and chair if you can. Dress as you would for the exam- for success. Have everything you will need there, so you don't loose any time looking for things. Do have a to do diary to keep track of what you need to do each session, and calendar to see how long you have for assignments etc. Also a plan of what to do as well as a timetable for each course/subject.

EXPERIMENT
Try out different ways of learning to see what suits you and stick to it:
1.Memory Palaces
2.Visualisation
3.Mind maps/spider charts
4. Loci method
5.Roman Room method
6 Flash cards
7 Post it notes around the house
8 Acronyms
9 Poems
10 Rhythms
11 Rhymes
12 Dance moves
13 Songs and lyrics
14 Audio files
15 You tube videos
16 Cheat sheets, charts and tables

OTHER BITS
Have a balanced life, make sure you eat nutritionally well, drink plenty of water,and EXERCISE, it all helps the brain remember. It is also vital when you are under exam stress, as it will help you not burn out.

WHEN TO REVISE
Some subjects need constant revision (ie maths), but in most cases it should tick over until January, when you kick up the revision and then again 1-2 months before the final exams.

REMEMBER REVISION AND LEARNING IS A MARATHON AND NOT A SPRINT.
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Ameba
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Write notes and put them in folders, because you can move things around and replace things if they are wrong.

Writing notes helps you to store it in your memory better than typing does, even though it takes longer it is better.

Also practice tests, and past tests can help you to revise.
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