medhelp
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can someone please explain the "magnet" part of this - I originally thought it was just meant to be a model for weak bonds or something but then my professor kept saying "magnetic interactions" as well so?


i didn't know enzymes had magnetic interactions
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bobby147
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(Original post by medhelp)
can someone please explain the "magnet" part of this - I originally thought it was just meant to be a model for weak bonds or something but then my professor kept saying "magnetic interactions" as well so?


i didn't know enzymes had magnetic interactions
The book says the magnets are meant to be model for the non-covalent bonds.
But your professor is not wrong.

Magnetism is part of Electromagnetism(electricity and magnetism) ,one of the four fundamental forces.

Non covalent forces such as hydrogen bonding,electrostatics and ionic bonding can be explained by electromagnetism.

When you are talking about attraction between electrically charged particles as you are in the three intermolecular forces I mentioned above, from a physics point of view ,you are really talking about electromagnetism.
Remember,chemistry is just applied physics !
Hope this helps.
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