Psaa
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How does boiling point differ in ionic compounds , simple molecules , giant covalent structures and metals ? And why? I know this is the basics but have just always struggled on it. Thanks
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C_Yap
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(Original post by Psaa)
How does boiling point differ in ionic compounds , simple molecules , giant covalent structures and metals ? And why? I know this is the basics but have just always struggled on it. Thanks
Ionic compounds:
- Strong attraction between oppositely charged ions = high BP
- Higher charge and/or smaller ions = stronger attraction = more energy required to overcome these forces = higher BP

Simple molecular:
- Weak inter-molecular forces between molecules = easy to overcome these forces of attraction = low BP
I'm assuming you are only doing GCSE, so this will be all you need (I think)

Giant covalent:
- Many strong covalent bonds need to be broken = highest BP

Metals:
- Strong attraction between positive metal ions and delocalised electrons = high BP
- Smaller ion and/or higher charge = larger electrostatic attraction = higher BP
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Arctic Kitten
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When you boil something, you are trying to separate the closely packaged molecules in liquid/aqueous solution so they become gaseous. So the boiling points differ because the energy required to separate the molecules (ie the intermolecular force) differ.
For example, metallic bonding is really strong (it's the force between delocalised electrons and the nuclei) so its boiling point is high.
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Psaa
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(Original post by Baaah)
Ionic compounds:
- Strong attraction between oppositely charged ions = high BP
- Higher charge and/or smaller ions = stronger attraction = more energy required to overcome these forces = higher BP

Simple molecular:
- Weak inter-molecular forces between molecules = easy to overcome these forces of attraction = low BP
I'm assuming you are only doing GCSE, so this will be all you need (I think)

Giant covalent:
- Many strong covalent bonds need to be broken = highest BP

Metals:
- Strong attraction between positive metal ions and delocalised electrons = high BP
- Smaller ion and/or higher charge = larger electrostatic attraction = higher BP
Thanks , when you say strong attraction does that refer to strong electrostatic forces of attraction?
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C_Yap
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(Original post by Psaa)
Thanks , when you say strong attraction does that refer to strong electrostatic forces of attraction?
For the metal and ionic compounds, yes it is electrostatic. However I don't think you will be penalised for just writing attraction.

If you need more help feel free to ask more questions
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Psaa
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(Original post by Baaah)
For the metal and ionic compounds, yes it is electrostatic. However I don't think you will be penalised for just writing attraction.

If you need more help feel free to ask more questions
Thanks for your help!
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Pigster
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(Original post by Arctic Kitten)
For example, metallic bonding is really strong (it's the force between delocalised electrons and the nuclei) so its boiling point is high.
it's the force between delocalised electrons and the cations.
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Arctic Kitten
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(Original post by Pigster)
it's the force between delocalised electrons and the cations.
Ah yesss, I forgot most of my Chemistry already
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Pigster
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(Original post by Baaah)
For the metal and ionic compounds, yes it is electrostatic. However I don't think you will be penalised for just writing attraction.
In chemistry, all attractions are electrostatic.

It is indeed good practice to mention the word, but typically isn't penalised. But what is typically penalised is describing the wrong particles, e.g. describing metallic bonding as being between electrons and nuclei
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Psaa
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(Original post by Baaah)
For the metal and ionic compounds, yes it is electrostatic. However I don't think you will be penalised for just writing attraction.

If you need more help feel free to ask more questions
One last thing - Is ionic bond and electrostatic force of attraction the same thing?
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C_Yap
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(Original post by Psaa)
One last thing - Is ionic bond and electrostatic force of attraction the same thing?
Ionic bonds are always electrostatic forces of attraction, but electrostatic forces of attraction aren't always ionic bonds.

Not sure if I made it clear... :/
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Psaa
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(Original post by Baaah)
Ionic bonds are always electrostatic forces of attraction, but electrostatic forces of attraction aren't always ionic bonds.

Not sure if I made it clear... :/
Yeah I think so as in covalent bonds are electrostatic as well...
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SonicSam
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Is there van deer walls force of attraction in ionic and covalent compound ? Or is this only for molecules ( both simple and giant )
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C_Yap
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(Original post by SonicSam)
Is there van deer walls force of attraction in ionic and covalent compound ? Or is this only for molecules ( both simple and giant )
Not in ionic and covalent compounds, but between molecules or atoms.
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C_Yap
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(Original post by Psaa)
Yeah I think so as in covalent bonds are electrostatic as well...
Yes, there is electrostatic attraction between the positive nuclei and the shared pair of electrons
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Psaa
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One last thing - if a metal and an oxide makes a base compound then is there such a thing as an acid compound?
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SonicSam
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(Original post by Baaah)
Not in ionic and covalent compounds, but between molecules or atoms.
So as a atom there is VDW but not as ions? Just to confirm
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