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    As young as 18/19, we are expected to make big life decisions. This may not always be true - my friends are studying subjects with 0 idea about what they want to do afterwards, but its okay. For me, rightly or wrongly, I like having something to work towards and a career goal instead of just going with the flow.
    This has actually become a pain for me! Im studying law at a top UK/world uni and everyone tells me that I have amazing career prospects ahead of me and what not. Possibly true, but I dont think law is taking me where I want to be. The thought of an office job fills me with dread. Id rather be on my feet, speaking to people in a job where there are multiple and diverse roles. I dont think sitting in an office, working terribly long hours without feeling like you are making a difference is something which appeals to me at all.
    Which led me to think, maybe I should drop out and apply for a subject and then go into teaching. Teaching has always been an appealing idea for me, and there is no doubt that if their salary averaged £50-70k I would 100% have gone into it.
    Now im considering what my priorities are. Do I want job satisfaction and average pay (teaching) or no job satisfaction and high pay? (Law). I know that I want to make a difference with my career, but I do not want a boring job. Teaching is definitely something I would enjoy (I did it part time as a job on the side of studying and Ive always thought it is the career for me but never decided to pursue it, with people telling me I was "too smart"...)? I dont mean to say this offensively but many people have told me that my straight A* background means I could aspire to bigger things. Wouldnt say I agree or disagree with this.
    Now im concerned that if I make the switch, what if I regret this decision? I dont want to be in a position where in 10 years time Im disillusioned with my career, perhaps feeling like im not paid enough.
    Its annoying because Id want to spend a lot of time with family when Im older, and so dont want to go into a career ridden with notoriously long working hours. Id also love to be able to afford a lifestyle buying expensive clothes, cars and houses, something Law is more likely to bring about, but then this is not really plausible because this inherently comes with long working hours, and so im back to square one. I guess no job exists which will give me good pay, good hours and the ability to maintain a family life.

    As a 19 year old how do I work out of its the money or the job satisfaction which will bring me happiness? I was given the advice by my dad who is a doctor that its best to find a midway between happiness and money, which I always thought Law was (with teaching being the ideal job but one I would discard) but now im trying to tell myself that Id rather feel fulfilled in a job... And I dont want to be sat in an office!

    I know that a) you dont need to go into law with a law degree. I am considering other options like managerial positions
    b) you dont need to do a degree in the subject you want to teach. But I would want to because I think it would make career progression easier.

    Do I make the switch? How do I decipher what my priorities are at this young age and make decisions accordingly?
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    do what you enjoy as long as the career pays the bills.
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    Hmm, would being an academic/lecturer at a top uni be a decent middle ground for you? If you enjoy the academic study of law, that could always be a good backup option. It is still going to be competitive anyway.
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    (Original post by Insecable)
    Hmm, would being an academic/lecturer at a top uni be a decent middle ground for you? If you enjoy the academic study of law, that could always be a good backup option. It is still going to be competitive anyway.
    Thanks for your reply. I did consider that and within a few weeks of uni I thought wow this could be a very suitable option. Because I do enjoy teaching, and Id enjoy teaching law (at uni, not high school). That said, academia comes with the requirement of research and writing, which is sort of what im trying to get away from and one of the reasons why Im put off by a career in law.

    I get that there is reading and writing in many jobs - doctor, teacher, etc. But I couldnt imagine doing it day in and day out like academics do. Research bores me!
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Thanks for your reply. I did consider that and within a few weeks of uni I thought wow this could be a very suitable option. Because I do enjoy teaching, and Id enjoy teaching law (at uni, not high school). That said, academia comes with the requirement of research and writing, which is sort of what im trying to get away from and one of the reasons why Im put off by a career in law.

    I get that there is reading and writing in many jobs - doctor, teacher, etc. But I couldnt imagine doing it day in and day out like academics do. Research bores me!
    I totally get that. I would say to follow your gut instinct. You only get one life, so do what you truly want to do. I don't know what else I could say, really. I'm here if you want to chat about it in more detail though!
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    You could be teaching only academic. Not all do research.
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    fulfillment > happiness
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    (Original post by triton62674)
    fulfillment > happiness
    Wouldnt you link the two? Fulfillment brings happiness...
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    As young as 18/19, we are expected to make big life decisions. This may not always be true - my friends are studying subjects with 0 idea about what they want to do afterwards, but its okay. For me, rightly or wrongly, I like having something to work towards and a career goal instead of just going with the flow.
    This has actually become a pain for me! Im studying law at a top UK/world uni and everyone tells me that I have amazing career prospects ahead of me and what not. Possibly true, but I dont think law is taking me where I want to be. The thought of an office job fills me with dread. Id rather be on my feet, speaking to people in a job where there are multiple and diverse roles. I dont think sitting in an office, working terribly long hours without feeling like you are making a difference is something which appeals to me at all.
    Which led me to think, maybe I should drop out and apply for a subject and then go into teaching. Teaching has always been an appealing idea for me, and there is no doubt that if their salary averaged £50-70k I would 100% have gone into it.
    Now im considering what my priorities are. Do I want job satisfaction and average pay (teaching) or no job satisfaction and high pay? (Law). I know that I want to make a difference with my career, but I do not want a boring job. Teaching is definitely something I would enjoy (I did it part time as a job on the side of studying and Ive always thought it is the career for me but never decided to pursue it, with people telling me I was "too smart"...)? I dont mean to say this offensively but many people have told me that my straight A* background means I could aspire to bigger things. Wouldnt say I agree or disagree with this.
    Now im concerned that if I make the switch, what if I regret this decision? I dont want to be in a position where in 10 years time Im disillusioned with my career, perhaps feeling like im not paid enough.
    Its annoying because Id want to spend a lot of time with family when Im older, and so dont want to go into a career ridden with notoriously long working hours. Id also love to be able to afford a lifestyle buying expensive clothes, cars and houses, something Law is more likely to bring about, but then this is not really plausible because this inherently comes with long working hours, and so im back to square one. I guess no job exists which will give me good pay, good hours and the ability to maintain a family life.

    As a 19 year old how do I work out of its the money or the job satisfaction which will bring me happiness? I was given the advice by my dad who is a doctor that its best to find a midway between happiness and money, which I always thought Law was (with teaching being the ideal job but one I would discard) but now im trying to tell myself that Id rather feel fulfilled in a job... And I dont want to be sat in an office!

    I know that a) you dont need to go into law with a law degree. I am considering other options like managerial positions
    b) you dont need to do a degree in the subject you want to teach. But I would want to because I think it would make career progression easier.

    Do I make the switch? How do I decipher what my priorities are at this young age and make decisions accordingly?
    If you want to teach a subject at degree level you have to have a Masters in the degree you want to teach, I think the bare minimum and this is quite rare is to have a 1st in Bachelors / LLB but usually it's a Masters or you don't make the cut.

    So if you want to to teach law at LLB level you need a LLM. That being said, you can complete your LLB and then go on to complete a masters in another subject, e.g. Economics and then go on to teach Economics if you wish, that's the beauty of masters is that you can change your career path completely through that single year.

    The one thing about life is never do what you don't feel happy or comfortable doing, and never do a subject people are telling you to do or you feel you are obliged to do academically.

    Study what you love and enjoy. There's a job for every field. I can't really given an answer to this thread because the answer is down to you and what your hobbies and interests are.

    I'd suggest, look online over the holidays and do thorough research into desired careers. How many working hours they require, as well as how happy said careers could possibly make you and how it'd mold into your future ideal life. Then lastly look at salary, and remember salary isn't everything and almost all degrees can have the possibilities of a stable job and income in the future.
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    For sure, but sometimes a lot of hard work and effort is needed, which may not bring immediate happiness.
    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Wouldnt you link the two? Fulfillment brings happiness...
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    If you want to teach a subject at degree level you have to have a Masters in the degree you want to teach, I think the bare minimum and this is quite rare is to have a 1st in Bachelors / LLB but usually it's a Masters or you don't make the cut.

    So if you want to to teach law at LLB level you need a LLM. That being said, you can complete your LLB and then go on to complete a masters in another subject, e.g. Economics and then go on to teach Economics if you wish, that's the beauty of masters is that you can change your career path completely through that single year.

    The one thing about life is never do what you don't feel happy or comfortable doing, and never do a subject people are telling you to do or you feel you are obliged to do academically.

    Study what you love and enjoy. There's a job for every field. I can't really given an answer to this thread because the answer is down to you and what your hobbies and interests are.

    I'd suggest, look online over the holidays and do thorough research into desired careers. How many working hours they require, as well as how happy said careers could possibly make you and how it'd mold into your future ideal life. Then lastly look at salary, and remember salary isn't everything and almost all degrees can have the possibilities of a stable job and income in the future.
    Thanks for your answer. I was looking at teaching my favourite subject at high school level. A Level would be the most enjoyable class to teach (I really enjoyed the whole A Level experience and my teacher was fantastic. She was probably the one who inspired me to teach).

    And as for that bolded part - that is a lesson I need to confront! People always tell me that my straight A* background means I should look at the 'big' careers - law, medicine, engineering, finance, computer science etc. Hate to say it but sometimes being academically strong can be a pain because it leads to a 'responsibility' to go into certain fields, and when you dont, people stare at you wondering where it went wrong instead of realising that sometimes people want more to life than to sell their souls in a career ridden with awful working hours :/

    Thankyou very much for your advice. Really appreciate it
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Thanks for your answer. I was looking at teaching my favourite subject at high school level. A Level would be the most enjoyable class to teach (I really enjoyed the whole A Level experience and my teacher was fantastic. She was probably the one who inspired me to teach).

    And as for that bolded part - that is a lesson I need to confront! People always tell me that my straight A* background means I should look at the 'big' careers - law, medicine, engineering, finance, computer science etc. Hate to say it but sometimes being academically strong can be a pain because it leads to a 'responsibility' to go into certain fields, and when you dont, people stare at you wondering where it went wrong instead of realising that sometimes people want more to life than to sell their souls in a career ridden with awful working hours :/

    Thankyou very much for your advice. Really appreciate it
    What subject is that if you don't mind me asking, you'll be fine with any mostly relevant BA degree then. Teaching is an amazingly fulfilling career, so I don't blame your passion at all!

    The answer is ignore everyone else and focus on your own passions. I felt obligated to study computer science because I have the skills, knowledge and academic ability in the subject, but now here I am applying for fashion because that's what my true passion is and what I want to learn. Who says you can't be an excelling academic in another subject or field? You're not any less smarter regardless of what you study.

    No one in the real, adult world would ever say such a thing as 'where did it all go wrong'. I think the only place this is true is TSR which isn't real life. The real adult world is completely different. People respect you for you and your abilities, passions and personality. When you graduate, no one cares what you studied or where (well they do but only in ways like applying for engineering jobs you need an engineering degree etc but I'm talking about general being in the workplace, friends you make and people around you).
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    What subject is that if you don't mind me asking, you'll be fine with any mostly relevant BA degree then. Teaching is an amazingly fulfilling career, so I don't blame your passion at all!

    The answer is ignore everyone else and focus on your own passions. I felt obligated to study computer science because I have the skills, knowledge and academic ability in the subject, but now here I am applying for fashion because that's what my true passion is and what I want to learn. Who says you can't be an excelling academic in another subject or field? You're not any less smarter regardless of what you study.

    No one in the real, adult world would ever say such a thing as 'where did it all go wrong'. I think the only place this is true is TSR which isn't real life. The real adult world is completely different. People respect you for you and your abilities, passions and personality. When you graduate, no one cares what you studied or where (well they do but only in ways like applying for engineering jobs you need an engineering degree etc but I'm talking about general being in the workplace, friends you make and people around you).
    The subject i'd love to teach is Maths. Would enjoy teaching Chemistry too but maths is my favourite subject, or at least was back at A Level Thanks very much for your post. If I do a maths degree Im aware that there are numerous career options, but finance or banking seems dead boring. Would rather something more lively, hence teaching. The only downside is I wouldnt be at a top uni for Maths, since whilst I am good (A* A Level), all the top unis require A* in Further Maths or a STEP paper and Im not on THAT Level (those are for the maths wizards)...
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    The subject i'd love to teach is Maths. Would enjoy teaching Chemistry too but maths is my favourite subject, or at least was back at A Level Thanks very much for your post. If I do a maths degree Im aware that there are numerous career options, but finance or banking seems dead boring. Would rather something more lively, hence teaching. The only downside is I wouldnt be at a top uni for Maths, since whilst I am good (A* A Level), all the top unis require A* in Further Maths or a STEP paper and Im not on THAT Level (those are for the maths wizards)...
    I'm not quite sure if just A Level Maths can cut becoming an A Level teacher unless one had a degree in Maths too. I just say that because most teachers of A Level Maths would be expected to also be able to teach Further Maths and Additional Further Maths modules. I'm not sure if this is entirely true but it just seems this would make sense. Have you considered doing a Maths degree instead, however then from your degree becoming a teacher? I guess it's just about thinking what you're sure you want to do before committing to it. A lot of Russel Group and reputable universities will happily accept you. Queen Mary I know have an entry requirement of AAB and A at A Level Maths which you've more then reached. Definitely consider the degree anyhow!

    Everything your saying is very mature, it's good that you're not finishing a degree blind but instead you're weighing your option and considering degree prospects. A ton of people don't before they go to uni. Whatever you decide to do (do let me know as I'm interested) at least you know you will have options that aren't office careers and never settle for one if you feel you wouldn't be happy in such an environment.

    Also don't discourage yourself. You could one day be a maths wizard. I used to say I could never be an artist, my drawing is terrible. Now my level of skill in drawing is next level, a level I thought I'd never reach. Same applies with any subject, practice and one will always become an expert!
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    I'm not quite sure if just A Level Maths can cut becoming an A Level teacher unless one had a degree in Maths too. I just say that because most teachers of A Level Maths would be expected to also be able to teach Further Maths and Additional Further Maths modules. I'm not sure if this is entirely true but it just seems this would make sense. Have you considered doing a Maths degree instead, however then from your degree becoming a teacher? I guess it's just about thinking what you're sure you want to do before committing to it. A lot of Russel Group and reputable universities will happily accept you. Queen Mary I know have an entry requirement of AAB and A at A Level Maths which you've more then reached. Definitely consider the degree anyhow!

    Everything your saying is very mature, it's good that you're not finishing a degree blind but instead you're weighing your option and considering degree prospects. A ton of people don't before they go to uni. Whatever you decide to do (do let me know as I'm interested) at least you know you will have options that aren't office careers and never settle for one if you feel you wouldn't be happy in such an environment.

    Also don't discourage yourself. You could one day be a maths wizard. I used to say I could never be an artist, my drawing is terrible. Now my level of skill in drawing is next level, a level I thought I'd never reach. Same applies with any subject, practice and one will always become an expert!
    Thanks for your advice - both motivational and useful!

    I did consider (and am currently) considering a maths degree because you're right - although I can do Law and a knowledge enhancement course, im worried this would limit me to GCSE and therefore I wont be able to teach A Level, or further maths etc. I think if I was to do a maths degree it would aid with career progression better - i.e. head of department, head of sixth form, headteacher even. That would also enable me to earn a salary of even more than my desirable salary £50-70k. But this is all just a bunch of "I coulds"...


    My concern is that, right this minute, as a student with no bills to pay or anything, I can wholeheartedly say that Id be happier as a teacher. Im just worried that down the line if money frustrations kick in, or I wont be able to afford the lifestyle I want, I'll regret leaving a prestigious university for law, wondering where it would have taken me had I stuck with it. As I said initially, its hard to identify your priorities at such a young age.
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Thanks for your advice - both motivational and useful!

    I did consider (and am currently) considering a maths degree because you're right - although I can do Law and a knowledge enhancement course, im worried this would limit me to GCSE and therefore I wont be able to teach A Level, or further maths etc. I think if I was to do a maths degree it would aid with career progression better - i.e. head of department, head of sixth form, headteacher even. That would also enable me to earn a salary of even more than my desirable salary £50-70k. But this is all just a bunch of "I coulds"...


    My concern is that, right this minute, as a student with no bills to pay or anything, I can wholeheartedly say that Id be happier as a teacher. Im just worried that down the line if money frustrations kick in, or I wont be able to afford the lifestyle I want, I'll regret leaving a prestigious university for law, wondering where it would have taken me had I stuck with it. As I said initially, its hard to identify your priorities at such a young age.
    No worries. Well you don't have to drop out, you could complete this year of Law, giving you a CertHE in Law so at least you get credit for the work you've done this year. I'd suggest still applying to UCAS so the option is there whether you decide to change to Maths or not. Have a look on league tables and entry requirements for different universities and see which ones you might consider, whether you feel from this you can make it into a teaching career, at a desired salary that may not make you feel so hesitant about leaving Law as a subject.

    Consider talking to the careers department of your current university about it too. Have you looked into whether you could transfer to Maths at your current uni?
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    No worries. Well you don't have to drop out, you could complete this year of Law, giving you a CertHE in Law so at least you get credit for the work you've done this year. I'd suggest still applying to UCAS so the option is there whether you decide to change to Maths or not. Have a look on league tables and entry requirements for different universities and see which ones you might consider, whether you feel from this you can make it into a teaching career, at a desired salary that may not make you feel so hesitant about leaving Law as a subject.

    Consider talking to the careers department of your current university about it too. Have you looked into whether you could transfer to Maths at your current uni?
    Theres a massive shortage of maths teachers so I think I would be able to make it. Plus, I have strong academic achievements which would hopefully help out too. With regards to salary, I think its important to realise that my salary would literally be the starting salary, basically £22k, rising to £30k maybe after many years. Possibly more if I manage to climb the ladder. Whereas with law, I can probably start on £40k according to research (im at Cambridge). Its a big pay jump, Id be giving up a great starting salary, 'prestige' (not my opinion but I hate to say it, thats the way it runs in ethnic families! The core 3 professions are doctor, lawyer or engineer) so thats why this decision is so hard.
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Theres a massive shortage of maths teachers so I think I would be able to make it. Plus, I have strong academic achievements which would hopefully help out too. With regards to salary, I think its important to realise that my salary would literally be the starting salary, basically £22k, rising to £30k maybe after many years. Possibly more if I manage to climb the ladder. Whereas with law, I can probably start on £40k according to research (im at Cambridge). Its a big pay jump, Id be giving up a great starting salary, 'prestige' (not my opinion but I hate to say it, thats the way it runs in ethnic families! The core 3 professions are doctor, lawyer or engineer) so thats why this decision is so hard.
    Oh wow you go to Cambridge, now I understand why this is such a hard decision! I would not like to be in your position at all, it's such a tough choice to make, whether to stay at such a prestigious place after hard work getting there or risking losing it for a passion. I completely understand, coming from an ethnic family as well.

    Money isn't everything, so that shouldn't be your worry. You can have stability even without a degree. Our world isn't as degree focused as it used to be but more so passion and work ethic/experience focused now. That being said, going to Cambridge is advantageous to career prospects and I do worry about how hard you've worked to get to Cambridge and whether it's right to leave.

    Have you considered possible non-office Law careers, or potentially after your degree teaching social sciences or something Law related instead?

    I understand how hard the decision is, yet at the same time I still have to say go with whatever your heart is telling you.
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    Oh wow you go to Cambridge, now I understand why this is such a hard decision! I would not like to be in your position at all, it's such a tough choice to make, whether to stay at such a prestigious place after hard work getting there or risking losing it for a passion. I completely understand, coming from an ethnic family as well.

    Money isn't everything, so that shouldn't be your worry. You can have stability even without a degree. Our world isn't as degree focused as it used to be but more so passion and work ethic/experience focused now. That being said, going to Cambridge is advantageous to career prospects and I do worry about how hard you've worked to get to Cambridge and whether it's right to leave.

    Have you considered possible non-office Law careers, or potentially after your degree teaching social sciences or something Law related instead?

    I understand how hard the decision is, yet at the same time I still have to say go with whatever your heart is telling you.
    Ah yes, all those A*s at GCSE, all those A*s at A Level, uni of my dreams and suddenly im like wow, this isnt for me. Its a difficult situation! Im currently looking at non-office law careers. Dont think id be into teaching social sciences/law - I think the attraction to a maths teacher is that I love both maths and teaching, whereas with law, its a cool subject which I could talk about for hours, but I cant imagine teaching it to an A Level class because they just wont have that interest!
    The uni itself is a main reason as to why this decision is hard - i know im in a good position studying a brilliant degree at a brilliant uni, and as I said with maths I wouldnt be able to go to Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick etc (which doesnt actually bother me in all fairness because its not necessary in teaching).
    And I would be sacrificing potentially great job prospects for a career which is not given enough respect in society.
    But again, I dont want to be unhappy. Thats why im considering continuing with my degree and doing undergrad maths, maybe a few years down the line, if I really get fed up.
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    (Original post by mirabella555)
    Ah yes, all those A*s at GCSE, all those A*s at A Level, uni of my dreams and suddenly im like wow, this isnt for me. Its a difficult situation! Im currently looking at non-office law careers. Dont think id be into teaching social sciences/law - I think the attraction to a maths teacher is that I love both maths and teaching, whereas with law, its a cool subject which I could talk about for hours, but I cant imagine teaching it to an A Level class because they just wont have that interest!
    The uni itself is a main reason as to why this decision is hard - i know im in a good position studying a brilliant degree at a brilliant uni, and as I said with maths I wouldnt be able to go to Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick etc (which doesnt actually bother me in all fairness because its not necessary in teaching).
    And I would be sacrificing potentially great job prospects for a career which is not given enough respect in society.
    But again, I dont want to be unhappy. Thats why im considering continuing with my degree and doing undergrad maths, maybe a few years down the line, if I really get fed up.
    I mean you're only eligible for 4 years of education under student finance, and student finance only covers a single degree as far as I remember, meaning you'd have to be in that law office job and save up to be able to afford to do a second degree in Maths if you wish to. That's why it is a good idea you're thinking about it now, before it's too late and whilst you still have 3 years of Student finance behind you to be able to choose a different university. I also just found out even completing your first year could mean you may not be eligible for student finance (I was in my first year this year and just left in Term 1, thank god otherwise I wouldn't be eligible next year). I mean I'm not sure if this is entirely true but I was just doing some vague reading that if you complete a CertHE (aka get a certificate for the first year of your degree) it counts as 'obtaining a HE qualification'. Tbh it's all quite confusing. I know many people who I think managed to get same amount of student finance restarting at a different uni doing a different subject so it doesn't make sense to me.

    Maths has such high earning possibilities even going to lower down universities over law I've heard if not on the same level?

    I would really say you've reached a position where the best thing to do is to weigh the pros and cons. That's what I did. I talked to my friends, my sister, my family and told myself what is it I wanted. After talking to them, my family agreed my happiness was most important and that since I have a job back home I'd might as well just leave, create a Fashion portfolio and reapply for what I love and what could be a more advantageous degree for my life goal (to be a fashion magazine editorial designer). I save a ton of money dropping out early, rather than later and having to pay back for a year where I felt I learnt nothing, I'm still annoyed I have to pay back term 1 considering how appalling the teaching at my previous university was! My friends all also agreed after knowing how awful my previous flatmates were it is a good decision to leave, as well as them knowing me as an artist could see I felt unchallenged by my degree and that I lacked the creativity I once had (that creativity and drive instantly came back as soon as I left, ironically)

    Make a list possibly, pros and cons. See what decision you may come to.
 
 
 
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