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BuggyWayani777
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As a highly qualified, passionate student, what are your chances of getting into MIT from the U.K., if you have great grades and 2-3 Engineering/STEM extra-curriculars? How is studying there different to the U.K., and how do you finance studying abroad if you come from a middle-class family?
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Ellieg333
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MIT only take about 150 students from the world every year across all subjects. Unless you're the very best of the best, with 6 A* levels and got to the finals of F1 in Schools, there is little point in trying... Also the fees are upwards of 40k a year
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by Ellieg333)
MIT only take about 150 students from the world every year across all subjects. Unless you're the very best of the best, with 6 A* levels and got to the finals of F1 in Schools, there is little point in trying... Also the fees are upwards of 40k a year
This is a very pessimistic view on things.

1150 students are admitted each year to undergraduate MIT, of which 10% (so 115) are internationals. Admission rate for internationals is 3% however due to how the US university application system works with people applying to up to 20 universities at a time, alongside people applying to high level universities even if they don't have the profile for it, that's not actually as low as it sounds. And you have to remember that while MIT is great, there are certainly other universities/colleges in the US or elsewhere in the world which people would have reason to choose over MIT, so the offer rate is likely somewhat higher.

In terms of academics you will be mostly assessed on your SAT scores, for this you should get 1500+ in your SAT and high 700s in your SAT subject tests, of which you should take two or three. By having A levels and coming from the UK you are already at a significant advantage, as A levels are already an advanced point of education compared to the large majority of applicants and there aren't that many applicants from the UK as we already have a stellar university system. That said he will likely need AAA or A*AA, from what I remember when I was applying, Yale stated AAA was the range they were looking for on their website, and this was only a few years ago so I don't think it will have gone up.

In terms of extracurriculars, yes, they will need to do way more and add in some non-STEM oriented stuff as US universities love being well rounded.

As for finances, MIT is one of the few US universities which is need-blind for internationals, so they will admit you without taking into account your financial need and then provide you with the appropriate amount of money dependent on your parents' income. If OP is middle class, they will probably get nearly all of their fees paid for as the maximum amount before you start having to pay more is $120,000 pa from what I remember when I looked a few months ago, so that's like £90,000. MIT is different in that they do expect you to put I think per year towards your costs even if you are below this income threshold, however you would do this via internships, of which if you're doing this in the US you will earn far more than that. Also as someone from a middle class background, their parents may well be contributing a similar amount if they were to study in the UK.

To OP, studying there is different in that there is no fixed structure, whereas UK degrees are based around a fixed course structure with a handful of optional classes. You will also have to fulfil liberal arts requirements of classes which are unrelated to your major (at MIT you have the option of some pretty weird classes for this if I remember correctly, it sounds awesome). In terms of assessment, they will assess you much more regularly via weekly quizzes and midterms and so you will need to work regularly too and keep up your attendance, whereas in the UK system you're usually assessed based mostly upon a final assignment or exam worth 90%+ of the class, and so most of the semester is very relaxed and you will work much harder towards the end.
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Ellieg333
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
This is a very pessimistic view on things.

1150 students are admitted each year to undergraduate MIT, of which 10% (so 115) are internationals. Admission rate for internationals is 3% however due to how the US university application system works with people applying to up to 20 universities at a time, alongside people applying to high level universities even if they don't have the profile for it, that's not actually as low as it sounds. And you have to remember that while MIT is great, there are certainly other universities/colleges in the US or elsewhere in the world which people would have reason to choose over MIT, so the offer rate is likely somewhat higher.

In terms of academics you will be mostly assessed on your SAT scores, for this you should get 1500+ in your SAT and high 700s in your SAT subject tests, of which you should take two or three. By having A levels and coming from the UK you are already at a significant advantage, as A levels are already an advanced point of education compared to the large majority of applicants and there aren't that many applicants from the UK as we already have a stellar university system. That said he will likely need AAA or A*AA, from what I remember when I was applying, Yale stated AAA was the range they were looking for on their website, and this was only a few years ago so I don't think it will have gone up.

In terms of extracurriculars, yes, they will need to do way more and add in some non-STEM oriented stuff as US universities love being well rounded.

As for finances, MIT is one of the few US universities which is need-blind for internationals, so they will admit you without taking into account your financial need and then provide you with the appropriate amount of money dependent on your parents' income. If OP is middle class, they will probably get nearly all of their fees paid for as the maximum amount before you start having to pay more is pa from what I remember when I looked a few months ago, so that's like £90,000. MIT is different in that they do expect you to put I think per year towards your costs even if you are below this income threshold, however you would do this via internships, of which if you're doing this in the US you will earn far more than that. Also as someone from a middle class background, their parents may well be contributing a similar amount if they were to study in the UK.

To OP, studying there is different in that there is no fixed structure, whereas UK degrees are based around a fixed course structure with a handful of optional classes. You will also have to fulfil liberal arts requirements of classes which are unrelated to your major (at MIT you have the option of some pretty weird classes for this if I remember correctly, it sounds awesome). In terms of assessment, they will assess you much more regularly via weekly quizzes and midterms and so you will need to work regularly too and keep up your attendance, whereas in the UK system you're usually assessed based mostly upon a final assignment or exam worth 90%+ of the class, and so most of the semester is very relaxed and you will work much harder towards the end.
Well said, I agree I am rather pessimistic on MIT, but as I said it is really hard to get in
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M451
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(Original post by BuggyWayani777)
As a highly qualified, passionate student, what are your chances of getting into MIT from the U.K., if you have great grades and 2-3 Engineering/STEM extra-curriculars? How is studying there different to the U.K., and how do you finance studying abroad if you come from a middle-class family?
May I ask what year group you're in?
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Cs115
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Do 4 A-Levels at least. Maths FM Physics and Chem is a good combo for MIT but if you really want to get in u gotta have done some olympiads or smth and done very very well in them. I'm sure it's possible without but those will significantly improve your chances. Perfect grades are a given of course along w around 1550 on the SAT/ 35+ ACT
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asbadhmtc
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They don’t care about how many a levels. 4 isn’t an advantage to 3
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Cs115
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I'm pretty sure they take into account the rigor of your course load. you can search it up. if your school allows u to take 4 a levels then do it as that is usually the most rigorous course load.
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Cs115
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(Original post by Cs115)
I'm pretty sure they take into account the rigor of your course load. you can search it up. if your school allows u to take 4 a levels then do it as that is usually the most rigorous course load.
Also, the fact that so many people can easily do 4 a levels means that it should be the minimum ur doing for a school like MIT. What actually separates you from others are your extracurricular achievements but you must first fulfill the minimum academic requirements
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ajj2000
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(Original post by asbadhmtc)
They don’t care about how many a levels. 4 isn’t an advantage to 3
Any reason for saying this? I’ve heard the opposite for competitive us universities (as opposed to ones in the U.K)
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