mads_12.x
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Does anyone have any recommendations for what I can read as wider reading for psychology?
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SafiaFarzana
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Thinking, fast and slow - Daniel Kahneman
The psychopath test- Jon Ronson
The better angels of our nature- Steven Pinker
Snakes in Suits- Paul Babiak and Robert Hare
The Lucifer effect- Philip Zimbardo
Blink- Malcom Gladwell
The man who mistook his wife for a hat - Oliver Sacks
How the mind works - Steven Pinker

Enjoy! And best wishes for whatever you choose to do in the future x
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tripplea
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Thinking, fast and slow - Daniel Kahneman
You are not so smart - David McRaney
Phantoms in the brain - V.S Ramachandran
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat - Oliver Sacks
Musicophillia - Oliver Sacks
How the mind works - Steven Pinker
The Better Angels of Our Nature - Steven Pinker
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SafiaFarzana
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Some fiction choices, too, that have brilliant storylines and characters that can be both enjoyed and analysed at a psychological level:
Sharp objects- Gillian Flynn
Gone girl- Gillian Flynn
Dark Places- Gillian Flynn (she’s pretty great haha)
The curious incident of the dog in the nighttime - Mark Haddon
The perks of being a wallflower- Stephen Chbosky
The wasp factory - Iain Banks
The bell jar - Sylvia Plath

Of course, there are plenty more that can be found with a quick google search, but these are my personal recommendations
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mads_12.x
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(Original post by SafiaFarzana)
Thinking, fast and slow - Daniel Kahneman
The psychopath test- Jon Ronson
The better angels of our nature- Steven Pinker
Snakes in Suits- Paul Babiak and Robert Hare
The Lucifer effect- Philip Zimbardo
Blink- Malcom Gladwell
The man who mistook his wife for a hat - Oliver Sacks
How the mind works - Steven Pinker

Enjoy! And best wishes for whatever you choose to do in the future x
Thank you x
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mads_12.x
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(Original post by SafiaFarzana)
Some fiction choices, too, that have brilliant storylines and characters that can be both enjoyed and analysed at a psychological level:
Sharp objects- Gillian Flynn
Gone girl- Gillian Flynn
Dark Places- Gillian Flynn (she’s pretty great haha)
The curious incident of the dog in the nighttime - Mark Haddon
The perks of being a wallflower- Stephen Chbosky
The wasp factory - Iain Banks
The bell jar - Sylvia Plath

Of course, there are plenty more that can be found with a quick google search, but these are my personal recommendations
Ahh thank you, we're reading a lot of fiction along this theme in English for our coursework, including the Bell Jar, so thank you for the recommendations
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Huw M Thomas
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The Bible and anything on Systematic Theology.

Psychology is the study of mind and behaviour

Philosophy are those that seek guiding principles on psychological theories

Theology provides all the answers that psychologists and philosophers seek.
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by SafiaFarzana)
Thinking, fast and slow - Daniel Kahneman
The psychopath test- Jon Ronson
The better angels of our nature- Steven Pinker
Snakes in Suits- Paul Babiak and Robert Hare
The Lucifer effect- Philip Zimbardo
Blink- Malcom Gladwell
The man who mistook his wife for a hat - Oliver Sacks
How the mind works - Steven Pinker

Enjoy! And best wishes for whatever you choose to do in the future x
My lecturer at uni is a forensic psychologist and has conducted a lot of research on psychopathy, and strongly advised against The Psychopath Test. It’s basically full of cliches and has very little basis in actual research. In short, it’s bull shite.


OP, what sort of wider reading do you mean? Do you mean reading that relates to your A-level in order to better your marks, or wider reading for enjoyment?
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doodle_333
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anything by Oliver Sacks (man who mistook his wife for a hat is good also enjoyed hallucinations and there's one about music which looks good)
anything by AR Luria
butterfly and the belljar
temple grandin wrote a couple of good books
you could read some Freud e.g. psychopathy of everyday life

you could also ask your teacher if they have any actual psychology journal articles you could try
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mads_12.x
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
My lecturer at uni is a forensic psychologist and has conducted a lot of research on psychopathy, and strongly advised against The Psychopath Test. It’s basically full of cliches and has very little basis in actual research. In short, it’s bull shite.


OP, what sort of wider reading do you mean? Do you mean reading that relates to your A-level in order to better your marks, or wider reading for enjoyment?
Thank you for the advice the wider reading is mainly just to expand my knowledge, not necessarily to better my marks but to explore psychology a bit more outside of what we study in class, I'm very curious to read more into it
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SafiaFarzana
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
My lecturer at uni is a forensic psychologist and has conducted a lot of research on psychopathy, and strongly advised against The Psychopath Test. It’s basically full of cliches and has very little basis in actual research. In short, it’s bull shite.
I have heard this view before, but honestly I think it’s much more important to read a wide range of material, evaluate the ideas presented, and come to your own conclusions. It’s one of the most crucial skills for being a psychologist. Reading a text does not by any means equate to believing its views at face value - enrich yourself in understanding opposing beliefs, then craft your own conclusions.
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by SafiaFarzana)
I have heard this view before, but honestly I think it’s much more important to read a wide range of material, evaluate the ideas presented, and come to your own conclusions. It’s one of the most crucial skills for being a psychologist. Reading a text does not by any means equate to believing its views at face value - enrich yourself in understanding opposing beliefs, then craft your own conclusions.

That reasoning applies nicely to journal articles, but not to a book which is borderline fiction and presents a completely stereotypical and inaccurate depiction of psychology.
It’s cliche and unhelpful.

It perpetuates notions that psychology is a pseudo-science and not worthy of respect, because it’s complete bs.

There’s no point in taking time to craft conclusions when the subject has absolutely no basis in science.
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