GCSE French Help!!! Watch

The Big "R"
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I am currently working at a 4 in French however i would like to get a 7 in the exams please give me some tips on how to improve.
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Eleperson
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If you don't have memrise sign up and go on the GCSE AQA vocab even if you aren't doing AQA it will help. Get a CGP revision guide. Free french learning apps. Write some stuff in French. Ask for more homework. Go on Netflix or youtube and listen to stuff in french. Netflix is good becasue you don't have to listen to weird stuff you can watch you fav programme with dubbed audio. Make mind maps of topics and vocab you need to learn. Also exam tip: most the time they set traps so they will say, I like the sun, but I prefer rain. Read some french articles. Talk to friends or others in French. Sticky note french words on objects. Also I'm a 4 atm don't worry about it, just needs reg practice.
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The Big "R"
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(Original post by Eleperson)
If you don't have memrise sign up and go on the GCSE AQA vocab even if you aren't doing AQA it will help. Get a CGP revision guide. Free french learning apps. Write some stuff in French. Ask for more homework. Go on Netflix or youtube and listen to stuff in french. Netflix is good becasue you don't have to listen to weird stuff you can watch you fav programme with dubbed audio. Make mind maps of topics and vocab you need to learn. Also exam tip: most the time they set traps so they will say, I like the sun, but I prefer rain. Read some french articles. Talk to friends or others in French. Sticky note french words on objects. Also I'm a 4 atm don't worry about it, just needs reg practice.
Thank You very much
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AnIndividual
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(Original post by roshanroy_7)
I am currently working at a 4 in French however i would like to get a 7 in the exams please give me some tips on how to improve.
I've posted this multiple times and its mainly geared for the A-level, but it does contain some useful tips.


Here are some tips I gave another user as well as some additional advice:

- Use impersonal expressions - in particular 'il s'agit de' and 'il faut' - In doing so you sound more French and 'il faut' can be turned into a subjunctive by making it 'il faut que'

- Don't obfuscate - from what I've seen and read, the best French is simple, and too many people when asked to write a response simply look for posh sounding expressions (my least favourite being 'la premiere constatation qui s'impose', etc.) because they believe it enhances the quality of their work - it doesn't and makes it sound too over the top and un-french

- The subjunctive: try to not go overboard with the subjunctive. If used too often it makes you sound pompous. I basically limited myself to 'bien que', 'pour que' and 'il faut que', however, if you are in dire need of a subjunctive (you will likely need at least 2 per essay to get high grammar marks) you can make a subjunctive by making je pense que and je crois que negative - for example, je pense que ce n'est pas bon could be made into je ne pense pas que ce soit bon - a bad example, but you get the drift

- Read! Definitely read articles and try and get as much vocab as possible from them. Read books too if you like, but I found them either too long or too archaic for me to effectively revise vocab from them. Articles are also an excellent way to improve the quality of your written French. For instance, I noticed the French love of past participles (see below) just through reading, and then I applied that to my essays

- Using past participles - One thing I've noticed is that the French LOVE past participles which they use to 'strengthen' (I can't think of a better term) their nouns. For example you could say 'les decisions de la Cour Supreme' although I would prefer to say 'Les decisions PRISES PAR la Cour Supreme'. Both sentences work, but using participles in this way will gain you grammar points and also sounds more French. Also starting your sentences with past participles can add to the overall Frenchness of your language

- Using present participles - This is a super easy way to gain grammar points if done effectively - once in a while replacing 'ce qui VERB' or 'qui VERB' with a present participle can demonstrate that you understand where to use them, but don't overdo it

- For translations vocab is essential so I advise 3 things: Firstly make sure your additional reading is about a wide range of subjects that correlate roughly to the syllabus - Le Monde is a great paper for this. Second, go through the vocab lists that are provided by the exam boards, ESPECIALLY the GCSE ones. These are so often forgotten, yet contain an enormous amount of basic words that can help in almost all translations. You also should have vocab lists at the back of your A level textbooks which are worth learning as well. Third, learn more obscure prepositions. These can be found listed in almost all French grammar books (though in my opinion Shaums is the best) and are expressions such as 'au dela de' (beyond) - I mention this specifically because this was on the OCR A2 translation this year and was vital for getting all available marks.

- Use exemplars: The availability of these depends on the exam board - AQA has a bunch and OCR has none from what I've seen. However, finding good ones can really help you see how others have structured their essays. The best one I've ever come across is student 8 from the following link:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...-E-U3-1203.PDF
Note in particular how he has used impersonal expressions such as il s'agit de to improve his grammatical range

Best of luck with everything!
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clouddbubbles
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ditto for what other people have said, it’s all about vocabulary as a foundation to begin with!
and to learn this vocabulary, use apps like memrise and quizlet!

after this, go for more complex things like how you will write, using negative and positive expressions, different tenses and verbs - but don’t go straight for it! make sure you have the foundations first
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The Big "R"
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(Original post by AnIndividual)
I've posted this multiple times and its mainly geared for the A-level, but it does contain some useful tips.


Here are some tips I gave another user as well as some additional advice:

- Use impersonal expressions - in particular 'il s'agit de' and 'il faut' - In doing so you sound more French and 'il faut' can be turned into a subjunctive by making it 'il faut que'

- Don't obfuscate - from what I've seen and read, the best French is simple, and too many people when asked to write a response simply look for posh sounding expressions (my least favourite being 'la premiere constatation qui s'impose', etc.) because they believe it enhances the quality of their work - it doesn't and makes it sound too over the top and un-french

- The subjunctive: try to not go overboard with the subjunctive. If used too often it makes you sound pompous. I basically limited myself to 'bien que', 'pour que' and 'il faut que', however, if you are in dire need of a subjunctive (you will likely need at least 2 per essay to get high grammar marks) you can make a subjunctive by making je pense que and je crois que negative - for example, je pense que ce n'est pas bon could be made into je ne pense pas que ce soit bon - a bad example, but you get the drift

- Read! Definitely read articles and try and get as much vocab as possible from them. Read books too if you like, but I found them either too long or too archaic for me to effectively revise vocab from them. Articles are also an excellent way to improve the quality of your written French. For instance, I noticed the French love of past participles (see below) just through reading, and then I applied that to my essays

- Using past participles - One thing I've noticed is that the French LOVE past participles which they use to 'strengthen' (I can't think of a better term) their nouns. For example you could say 'les decisions de la Cour Supreme' although I would prefer to say 'Les decisions PRISES PAR la Cour Supreme'. Both sentences work, but using participles in this way will gain you grammar points and also sounds more French. Also starting your sentences with past participles can add to the overall Frenchness of your language

- Using present participles - This is a super easy way to gain grammar points if done effectively - once in a while replacing 'ce qui VERB' or 'qui VERB' with a present participle can demonstrate that you understand where to use them, but don't overdo it

- For translations vocab is essential so I advise 3 things: Firstly make sure your additional reading is about a wide range of subjects that correlate roughly to the syllabus - Le Monde is a great paper for this. Second, go through the vocab lists that are provided by the exam boards, ESPECIALLY the GCSE ones. These are so often forgotten, yet contain an enormous amount of basic words that can help in almost all translations. You also should have vocab lists at the back of your A level textbooks which are worth learning as well. Third, learn more obscure prepositions. These can be found listed in almost all French grammar books (though in my opinion Shaums is the best) and are expressions such as 'au dela de' (beyond) - I mention this specifically because this was on the OCR A2 translation this year and was vital for getting all available marks.

- Use exemplars: The availability of these depends on the exam board - AQA has a bunch and OCR has none from what I've seen. However, finding good ones can really help you see how others have structured their essays. The best one I've ever come across is student 8 from the following link:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...-E-U3-1203.PDF
Note in particular how he has used impersonal expressions such as il s'agit de to improve his grammatical range

Best of luck with everything!
Thank you that's a lot of information to take in but ill be sure to take it into account

(Original post by clouddbubbles)
ditto for what other people have said, it’s all about vocabulary as a foundation to begin with!
and to learn this vocabulary, use apps like memrise and quizlet!

after this, go for more complex things like how you will write, using negative and positive expressions, different tenses and verbs - but don’t go straight for it! make sure you have the foundations first
Yeah i think that is my problem with French i haven't had the best teachers over the last few years and am only now taking an initiative to learn
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clouddbubbles
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(Original post by roshanroy_7)
Yeah i think that is my problem with French i haven't had the best teachers over the last few years and am only now taking an initiative to learn
well it’s good that you’re trying to get better at this stage!
as i said, get that foundation laid and then aim for all the extra stuff that will get you the highest grades!
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Pink fizz
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Memrise and duolingo. With languages you should do a little everyday
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