Opinions on EPQ (Extended Project Qualification)?

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charlie300
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#1
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#1
Thinking of doing EPQ next year,
what is it like?
any advice/tips?
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Zoe Lea
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I'm doing EPQ and it's such a good thing to do to boost your application to uni, some unis even lower their entry requirements if you've gotten a good grade in your EPQ.

Tip: don't do it on something random!!! Definitely do it on what you want to do in the future because it shows passion for that subject which unis will like.
eg. if your going into literature do an EPQ on something like "The greatest female characters in 19th century literature "

Hope this persuades you to do EPQ
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xEmilyxx
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Taking the EPQ was probably the best decision of my life. Not because it gave me lower offers which is of course always a bonus, but it helped me develop a whole new method of evaluating the world. I did a sociolinguistic historical EPQ (basically the study of how a social factor affects your language and how this factor's influence has changed through a period) and even though it's something as basic as that, the type of thought needed is so good and different to your main subjects. After studying it you'll see just how rigid the exam boards are. It's a great thing to help you develop the basis of some of the skills needed in university.

My number one tip is to be organised. Procrastination is the main enemy because you're doing most of the 5k word essay at home. Keep your research and notes organised so you can put them onto your log easily. Write down every single thought you have in relation to the project (most of mine came late at night just as I was going to sleep) as noting these down further help show how you thought through it. Also, make sure you pick a topic that you LOVE. Maybe one you covered briefly in your A Levels but want to go into further detail in is a good choice, as you can always ask the subject teacher for advice as its likely they know a bit about it from their degree and can point you in the right direction. You can pick something you like as a hobby, but you have to make sure its academic, meaning that something you want to study at university or are doing at A Level is a good choice.

I hope you do enjoy it if you do choose to do it. The hard work pays off and even if you aren't going to university, its a good way of exploring something you're interested in.
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okurr123
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(Original post by xEmilyxx)
Taking the EPQ was probably the best decision of my life. Not because it gave me lower offers which is of course always a bonus, but it helped me develop a whole new method of evaluating the world. I did a sociolinguistic historical EPQ (basically the study of how a social factor affects your language and how this factor's influence has changed through a period) and even though it's something as basic as that, the type of thought needed is so good and different to your main subjects. After studying it you'll see just how rigid the exam boards are. It's a great thing to help you develop the basis of some of the skills needed in university.

My number one tip is to be organised. Procrastination is the main enemy because you're doing most of the 5k word essay at home. Keep your research and notes organised so you can put them onto your log easily. Write down every single thought you have in relation to the project (most of mine came late at night just as I was going to sleep) as noting these down further help show how you thought through it. Also, make sure you pick a topic that you LOVE. Maybe one you covered briefly in your A Levels but want to go into further detail in is a good choice, as you can always ask the subject teacher for advice as its likely they know a bit about it from their degree and can point you in the right direction. You can pick something you like as a hobby, but you have to make sure its academic, meaning that something you want to study at university or are doing at A Level is a good choice.

I hope you do enjoy it if you do choose to do it. The hard work pays off and even if you aren't going to university, its a good way of exploring something you're interested in.

Wow your topic seems so interesting ! Do you want to study linguistics or something along those lines? I really wanted to do my EPQ on languages/linguistics and so I chose to do it psycholinguistics, which is about psychology behind languages (:
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xEmilyxx
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(Original post by okurr123)
Wow your topic seems so interesting ! Do you want to study linguistics or something along those lines? I really wanted to do my EPQ on languages/linguistics and so I chose to do it psycholinguistics, which is about psychology behind languages (:
I've applied for and been given offers for Linguistics degrees yes, but because hardly any universities actually offer a pure Linguistics degree (I think about ten do) the three other choices of mine are English Language. But if you look at the modules between some Linguistics degrees and English Language degrees, they're essentially the same. All English Language degrees I've looked at offer sociolinguistics at the bare minimum.

I considered doing a psycholinguistics EPQ at the start, but since I visited universities I found out that a fair amount of pyscholinguistics involve using ideas that are very scientific based, and because I don't do psychology at the moment I may have struggled to self teach the concepts.
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onceuponamedic
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I did the EPQ and don't really think it was worth how much effort it actually takes.

I've summarised my thoughts on it here over on my blog: https://lifeofamedic.com/should-i-do-the-epq/
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yeahthatonethere
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I'm currently doing my epq (year 13) and have just finished my first draft of the final piece.

I'd say it was worth it personally as it led to me getting lower offers from two universities which is great! It was also a big part of my personal statement and I have a feeling it will be brought up in my uni interview in February. It shows interest, skills and dedications to a topic and helps build key skills like time management, personal goal setting and essay writing.

I'd give a few bits of advice:
1 - If you know what you want to do at university then do something related (and interesting, it has to be interesting to you for you to not want to drop out 2 months in like majority of my class). I want to go into Microbiology/Biomed and mine is related to the prospect of using viruses and bacteria to treat diseases.

2 - Start early and don't neglect the logbook. Our first draft is due a week on Friday and I had all of my sources ready by October (give or take a few) with chunks of it already written, ready to be pieced together into one big essay and it's been pretty stress free. My friend on the other hand has nothing written, 4 sources and is stressed to the hilt about getting this done alongside her coursework and homeworks and revision for assessments. So yeah starting early is always good! Also make a detailed logbook. It is where majority of you marks go and its best just to do it as you go instead of trying to remember everything the day before the page is due.

I wouldn't say I'm enjoying it, but I wouldn't say I'm hating it either.

Hope I've helped and anymore questions just ask!
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